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SHIPPING.

HIGH WATER.

TO-MORROW

Taiaroa Head : 8.51 a.m., 9TB P-" 1 Turt Chalmers : 9.51 a.m.. 9.08 p.m Dunedin : 10.1 a.m.. 10.28 p.m.

THE SUN. Sets to-day, 7.6 p.m. ; rises to-morrow, 4.37 a.m.

THE MOON

Sets to-morrow, 10.35 a.m. ; rises to morrow. 1.11 a.m.

—Phases During November. November 11 Last quarter U-7 a.m November 18 New moon o->}- <>m November 25 First quarter L 9 a.m

WEATHER REPORTS

ifne Government Meteorologist (Lev. C. C. Bates) supplied the following Tether reports at 9 a.m. to-day : Bar. Ther. W eath. Auckland—W., 1 30.33 62 }JC Napier—E.. I 52’il co it r Wanganui—W.. b ... oO.Od 5, Wellington— N.N.W.. in g ... -30.06 y G W estport—W •. 1 30. Oo o Orevmoufh—N.. 1 ... i;O.A - 1; ■Chrilwh-N.E..*l |:O9 M B || S »g T If S \) 6 Nuggets—N., fb ... 29.8b '■ P.luff-N.W., fb ... 29.84 oo ; Clyde—N.. str - ~, Tialclutha —S.W.. lb J ; 1 nvercargill—N.W.. br 29. u (o ■ C Naseby—N.W.. mg 2i.9a o9 O Port Chalmers— VE 1 ... 29.38 oo 1U Roxburgh-N.. 1 ... 29-30 59 j|C Pembroke —N•. str ... -b-9o Ju > Puysegur Point— , ‘ N.W.. str ... 29.29 bo < Wind.—L., light; hr, breeze; f k fresh breeze; m g. moderate gale: g. whole or heavy gale; w. gale ot exceptional severity. , , Weather.—B. blue sky. be the atmosphere clear or heavy ; C. clouds, passing t lends.; D, drizzling rain; E. toggv; gloomy, dark weather; 11. hail; L, iigntning;*M, misty; O. overcast, the whole skv covered with thick clouds: 1 . passing showers; Q. squally: R. rain, contimusl rain; S. snow; T. thunder; I . mg,\. threateriug appearance; Z, hn/y. FonrrAsT. The (Government Mcteorologi.-t ißc\. I>. C. Bates) supplied the following at noon to-day: —Strong N.W. v- intis : 'venther clouding over, an-1 rain later; jass tailing: tides 'good : sea moderate = \\e!l off shore. ARRlVED.—November 9. Kut a re. s.s. (11.5 p.m.i, 141 tons, I team. from Oannirn. IV-lieriia, s.s. (U..20 p.m.;. l.lio l"iis. Hilton, man Westport.

November 10,

Willoii'.ia. s.s. (9.45 a.m.i. 7.784 tons. Neville, from Sy-dncy.

Wimmera. s.s. (U).cs a.m.). 3.0J2 tons from I.vttcltoTi.

SA I LED.—November 9. Kini 18.25 p.tn.l. 1.122 tons. Stewart for West Coast ports.

The Kini sailed last evening for W e.-t----port and Greymonth. The Kotare arrived late hist night (nun Oatnant. and will sail again this afternoon for Invercargill and Riverton. The Willnchra arrived at 9.30 this morning from Sydney. The I‘ohenta arrived late la.-t night front Westport. The Wimmera reached Dunedin at 10 o'clock this morning from Lyttelton. The. Kaitangata. front .Melbourne, reached Greymonth in the early hours of this morning.

Captain Prydc. who has been ash.ire on transfer, will relieve Captain Bold, ot the Kamo, on holiday. The Board of Trade nude the following announcement in September "It is an essential feature of the (Jovevnrnent War Bisks Insurance scheme that all insured ships must obey implicitly ail orders and directions given by tin' Admiralty as to routes, ports of rail, stoppages, etc. To avoid misapprehension on this point the Board or Trade wish it to be clearly understood that this provision is intended to secure the safety of both ship ami carmi, and that any* deviation which may be rendered necessary in consequence of Admiralty orders or directions is in the interest of the cargo as well as of the ship. It is important that this fact should be borne in mind by all parties concerned in the shipment or carriage of goods on insured ships, and that in contracts or carriage the shipowners' obligation to comply with the Admiralty requirements mould be folly recognised." The annual report of the Hongkong Harbor Commission shows that the total or the shipping entering and clearing at ports in the colonv last veai amounted to 490,228 vessels 'of 57.742.982 tons. which, compared with the figures for 1912. indicate an increase of 1.609 vessels and 1,007,955 tons. Of the above 47.520 shifts of 25.821,652 tuns wen- engaged in the foreign trade, a.s agaiiisi 16.603 vessels of 24.259,270 tons in' 1912. It is of interest to note the altered rela- ■ tree position of (.'erinaii and Japanese .‘■hipping. In 1912 the funner was of 1.129,054 tons, or T. 4 per cent, of the total arrivals of ocean and river trade vessels, while under the .Japanese flaw came 592 ships of 1.572.194 tons, or 6.9 per cent. Last year the Cerman shipping fell to the third place, with 6,9 per cent, in number and 9.7 per cent, in tonnage, against Japan's 8.5 per rent, in number and 16.7 per cent, in tonnage. THE FERRY’ SERVICE. The Wahine. from Wellington, armed nt- Lyttelton at 6.55 this morning, and connected with the first express for the south. THE CANAL AND ITS EFFECTS. Any reference, to shipping to-day (says the annual review of the ‘Sydnev .Shipping List’) is incomplete unless mention be made of the Panama Canal. This creat waterway, the construction of who hj must have been in the mind of Balboa, the intrepid, when he led his hand across the Isthmus of Darien, and with the Mag of Castile in one hand, his sword in the other, walked into the surf, and gave the great ocean it? present name, promise? much to shipping owing to the various route? it shortens, thus bringing trade customers closer together. Balboa discovered. it. hut it fell to tin- Fremli to begin thing?, and they began in 1879. with the world-famous engineer (Ferdinand de Lease ps) us one of the great spirits. For nine years the work went on. then the company controlling it failed, and after a lapse of five years an organisation—the Panama Canal Company—took » hand. Formalities occupied (be time tip till 1904. ami on May 4 of that year another start, was made. It has been a disheartening task, this rutting np of the isthmus at times, but it went on just the same, each obstacle as it arose being overcame, until now tidings have arrived that even deep-sea shipping can negotiate the great waterways. .Inst as the work can be called tremendous, »»can the trade possibilities that the linking of the oceans open up be designated. Wc hero in Australia may not benefit ns much as some will ; but still, to the Commonwealth and New Zealand (the latter particularly) it means much in the wav of closer markets for our products. Certainly shipowners, and especially the British.* are not communicative about what their intentions are, hut it is an established fact that they are as alert as any other, and lose no point, and whatever benefit the completion of what a few years ago may have been looked upon as an impossible task does offer will be taken the fullest advantage of. FIRE ON THE NORFOLK. ' MELBOURNE, November 9. The agents of the steamer Norfolk report that the fire was more serious than was anticipated, and she is bumping badly.

The three forward holds are fitted, ami there is little hope of saving the vessel. MELBOURNE. November 10.

(ItoLvivwl Xfvpmbor 10. ut 10.00 a.m.) The Norfolk’s fixe is believed to bo controlled. She is cut ted from bon- to funnel, destroyin': all the deck fittings. The bridges and sides are buckled.

SHIPPING TELEGRAMS.

AUCKLAND, November 9.—6.45 p.m.. Navna. from Tonga. Samoa, and Fiji. GREYMOUTH, November 10-.—2.30 a.m.. Kaitangata. from Melbourne. LYTTELTON. November 9.—Remuera. for Dunedin.—6.lo p.m.. Wimmera. for Port Chalmers. —Monowai. for Wellington.

SYDNEY, November 9. — Hanley, from New Zealand. FREMANTLE. November 9.—Mongolia, from London.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141110.2.37

Bibliographic details

SHIPPING., Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Word Count
1,218

SHIPPING. Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

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