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AMUSEMENTS

HAYWARDS’ PICTURES. Altogether an excellent programme was screened last night at the Octagon Hull. Tho chief picture was entitled 1 One of our Girls,’ and serves to introduce to a Now Zealand audience a most charming young film actress in the person of Miss ITHzel Dawn. Miss Dawn in this particular comcdv plays Kato Shipley, an American heiress, healthy, pretty, and self-reliant. In Franco, so runs tho story, Kate's cousin Julie is to wed Comte dc Crcbillon, who is certainly a villain, and as such, the possessor of “a past.” Kato crosses the Atlantic, and is present at her cousin’s wedding, an “arranged” wedding which brings in its train a good deal of misery for the girl wife, for she loves her cousin Henri. The appearance of a broken but beautiful woman, the woman out of the Count’s past; her death by drowning in the old wishing well; the discovery of tho body through investigations carried on by an old family physician, all serves to develop the plot; but the final exposure does not come until the Count is tricked into believing himself to bo mortally wounded in his duel with Captain Gregory, and writes u confession regarding the drowned woman—his legal wife. Meanwhile Kate and Captain Gregory have fallen in love._ the gallant captain remaining faithful despite a compromising situation brought about by his fiancee’s impulsive and generous action in shielding Julie, and during which Henri is treacherously wounded by tho Count. And so the story runs easily and naturally to its close; tho Comte and his accomplice in crime are handed over to justice; Julio is free to marry her cousin, and Kate appropriately rewards tho “ fighting Britisher,” Captain Gregory. This 5,000 ft of film drama is decidedly worth seeing. Most interesting, too, are the pictures in connction with tho war. There are two sets of these, tho first being scones in London depicting Kitchener’s new army in tho making, and the second showing wounded English soldiers convalescing at Brighton; Belgian refugees being looked after, and other topical scenes. A set of war cartoons, sketched in lightning fashion, are very clover.- Other supports are ‘The Ever-gnllant Marquis’ fcornedvl, ‘A Mountain Pass ’ (colored scenic), and ‘Tangled Tangoists ’ (comedy), tho last showing the adipose Bunny ns an exponent of the tango. The same programme will be shown all this week. FULLERS’ PICTURES. The King’s Theatre was full long before 8 o’clock lust evening, and the new series of pictures screened was to all appearances highly appreciated. It was indeed a war programme. Pathe’s Gazette showed stirring scenes in (lie Homeland, such as ‘ Air Asquith at tho Guildhall,’ and ‘ Refugees from Louvain.’ ‘ I.ord Kitchener’s London Army ’ was the title_ of another picture. showing K. of K. reviewing these London recruits, the swearing in of the I.ord Mayor, etc. The big dramatic film of tho programme was ‘ Death Sign at High Noon,’ a line Indian story, tolling how a daughter of an Indian chief fell in love with her white schoolmaster. She returns to her tribe, and is betrothed to one of her own race, but love calls and she steals off to the teacher. The Indians demand her restoration to the tribe, and she is sent hack, hut again quietly leaves them. The enraged chief gives the settlers till noon to give her hack. Meanwhile the settlors have asked tlie school teacher to resign, and lie has set out. By chance the Indian girl comes across his camp, and they decide to remain together. The girl not having been restored by noon, the Indians attack the settlement. One of the settlers rides off for help, but the soldiers who come to the rescue are ambushed and massacred. Tho fight rages fiercer till, becoming aware of the position, the teacher dons an Indian dress and reaches the settlement, whore he holds up tho flag of truce. At the sacrifice of his own desires he tolls the Indians he will restore the girl, and finally persuades her to go back to the tribe. The comedy side of the programme consists of throe good films, ‘ His Sudden Recovery,’ ‘ A Deal in Statuary,’ and ‘Dorothy Danebridge, Militant.’ ‘Wireless from the War' is a clover picture, giving lightning sketches of cartoons of the war. An educational film showing good products and methods of cultivation in the Soudan is entitled ‘Food Products of :he Soudan.’ ‘ Angel of the Gulch ’ is a pretty little western drama, after the ‘ Sky Pilot ’ style. This excellent, allround programme will he shown again this evening. PLAZA PICTURES. As a sensational story, ’On the Verge of the War,’ now being screened at the Plaza Picture Palace, fills all rcfiuiroments. It tells of an intrigue, the failure of which saves tho I'nitcd States from war. There are excellent supports, which include tho drama ‘ Man and tho Master ’ ; a ramie, * Pimple Pinched ’; a comedy entitled ‘ That Awful Maid,’ and a topical ‘ Warwick Chronicle.’ QUKEX’S THEATRE. ‘ The Night Riders of Petersham ’ continue to thrill the audiences at the New Queen’s Theatre with their recklos doings, doings which find an appropriate setting in tho Wild West. A deeply interesting film is that depicting the review of Kitchener’s now array by Lord Roberts in London. The series of cartoons on tho war are particularly clover and amusing, while, for a straight-out “scream, ‘ Caught in Tights ’ would he difficult to beat. PRINCESS THEATRE. Mr Leslie Holmes and his new Musical Costume Comedy Company, tho Pierroto and Courtiers, will open * their Dunedin season on Monday next at the Princess Theatre. _ The principal comedian of tho combination is Mr Leslie Holmes, who is stated to be an artist of high attainments. Supporting him are Miss Rosina Palmerston (soprano), Miss Madge Griffiths (English contralto). Mr Harry Romano (English light comedian), Mr Sidney Kingsley (tenor), Miss Lon ore Graham fsonbrette), Mr Fred Deal (comedian). Those artists will be associated in concerted numbers and are responsible for the whole of the first part. The box plan is at tho Dreg, i den.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141110.2.32

Bibliographic details

AMUSEMENTS, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Word Count
999

AMUSEMENTS Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

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