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A brief sitting of the City Police Court was held this morning before Mr H. Y. Widdovvson, S.M., wuen Lizzie T> arrowman ami a first otfender, neither of whom appeared, were each fined 10s, with the usual alternative, on charges of drunken-

ness. .Stephen Horeham pleaded not guilty to a charge of being drunk in Dowling street, and applied for a remand for a, week, as he wished to put up a defence, and would consequently require witnesses. The case was remanded until Friday.

An Auckland lady has received from her brother, who is an official in the Telephone Company in Constantinople, a letter dated Ist September, which contains interesting comment on the situation in the Turkish capital. The correspondent (Mr H. H. Beil) writes:—“We arc practically cut off from the world here, and get lons of false news. There is no money, and precious little food. Wo only received half-pay last month, and doubt wo shall get that'much this. Of course, such a -state of things is unprecedented in the world’s history. Turkey has not yet declared war. but is acting as if she intended doing so, as the place- (army particularly) is absolutely under the thumb of Germany. It would be an awful sin to throw this country into war, as the poor follows are taken off the fields, and a rifle is put into their hands, and they arc sent to bo shot at. Moreover they have to provide their own food ; and I believe at the present moment lialf of the army is in a state of starvation, and to see the way they are equipped is awful. Imagine a poor fellow with a big pack on his back, wearing a pair of heelless slippers. The climate is about the same as yours, and would be as much ‘God’s Own Country’ as any place if a decent nation had it. The soil is most prolific, but laziness rules here. You will have read about the two German warships, the Goeben and Breslau, which escaped from tho Mediterranean. Well, they dodged behind a French passenger boat, so as to avoid the British guns, and then slipped into the Davdoncllcs and escaped, and were immediately sold to Turkey. Another of Germany’s fly moves. The women hero are feeling very nervous, as the Turks are overfond of a massacre; but there’s no fear of that to-dav, as they would have to deal with a people who hit back and hit hard.”

Work on the St. Clair marine parade was started this morning at tho' Moreau street end. Tho work, the plans of which ha vo been approved by the Public Works Department, will be carried out under the superintendence of tho city engineer, and it is anticipated that its construction to the end of the domain nearest tho present esplanade wifi more than absorb tho sum allocated (£5,0001. 'the footway is to be 15ft in wtdth. What about treating for tho acquisition of the lands required for connecting tho esplanade with tho parade? Delays in such matters are always dangerous. It is up to tho City Council and the St. Kiida Council to join hands in perfecting an undertaking that has many potentialities for both bodies.

In view of the expressed intention of Urn shipping companies to demand payment of freight on exports at port of shipment, and in view of the fact that a 25 per cent, surcharge on cargoes other than butter, cheese, and meal, to cover contingencies duo to the war has already been made, Mr J. G. Wilson (Dominion president of the Farmers’ Union) has telegraphed to the Prime Minister as follows :—" I desire strongly to protest, on behalf of the farmers, against the unreasonable attitude of the shipping companies Ln charging freight at the port of shipment, fn addition to 25 per cent, surcharge on the general cargo. We look to you, on the farmers’ behalf, to insist upon d withdrawal from this position, which means a large additional cost on all produce."

One of our municipal institutions that can bs relied on in the town clock. It never varies more than three or four seconds a week. Mr Townsend, who lias looked after this timepiece for 14 years, went up tho tower to-day and fitted in two small wheels on the Stuart street face. They had become worn, and thus caused the dock to stop twice. These are the first repairs worth speaking-of since the clock was put into position in 1880,

Mr Paulin’s forecast: Squally S.W. to N.W. winds and heavy rain showers. Suitable youths, who desire to follow the sea as a profession, will have an opportunity of joining the Union Steam Ship Company’s training ship Aparima on her return from Calcutta towards the end of December, by which time several of the apprenticed cadets will have completed their four years of service, when they will be transferred to the company’s steamers as junior officers. It may be mentioned that a good number oi the cadets have been already appointed to tho various steamers, and as there are ample opportunities for promotion in the company’s service, it rests with the lads as to how they progress in the future. A Sydney cable states that terrific storms are reported, and this may account for tho scarcity of war news The Huonvillo correspondent of the ‘Hobart Mercury,’ writing on November 1, says; —lt has been ascertained that a great catastrophe has happened in connection with the fruit crop in the Huon. For a couple of weeks or so orchardists in some parts of the Huon have had more or less misgiving as to tho ultimate effect of a. very severe frost which occin red a fortnight *ago last Thursday. There''have been other frosts, of course, but this was regarded as being much more severe than any tliafc had preceded or followed it. At any rate, it is being now blamed for certain dire effects, the full measure of which has onl3 - just Iroen discovered. . . . Probably the majority of the growers in the Huon have suffered more or less severely, and in not a few instances individual losses amount practically to tlie destruction of entire crops. Pears and stone fruits have in many cases suffered equally with the an pies. It is probable that tho majority of'tne afflicted orchardists have only to-day realise;] the full extent of their calamity, and I Vivo little doubt that this Sabbath will figure in Huon history as Black Sunday. It is, of course, difficult, as well ns premature to assess in round figures the amount, of damage done, but it must ultimately amount to very many thousands of pounds. One orchardist who expected to pick 5,000 cases will now bo fortunate if he gets 1,000 casco.

On October 24 (says the ‘Lyttelton Times’) an article appeared in the ‘Sun 1 newspaper reflecting on Mr C. I. Jennings in his professional capacity and in connection with his office as Mayor of Rangiora. A withdrawal of the statements made and an apology in the paper having been refused by tho publishers of tho paper, Mr Jennings has instructed his solicitors to issue a writ against tho Canterbury Publishing Company for tho recovery of substantial damages for alleged libel contained in tho article. The Prime Minister war, asked at his meeting at Papakura last night what tho Government proposed to do in regard to tho imposition of a war tax. Mr Massev replied that he thought it would be most foolish to impose a war tax. The Governniont had arranged for a loan at a very favorable rate of interest. The war would cost Now Zealand £2,C00,000, probably more and if a war tax was imposed, what would be the effect? Industries would stagnate and thousands would lie thrown out of employment, because wares payments would lie interfered with. ’"All who contributed to the taxes would pay towaids tho sinking fund and interest bn the loan, so that no war tax would bo necessary.

Tho Hospital Hoard’s architects have submitted a plan and specifications of the -Nurses Home to be built in Cumberland street. The Hospital Committee last evening decided to recommend tho board to forward the plan to Wellington f or the approval of the Minister of Hospitals, and to call for tenders for the erection of the building. 1 he Otago Art Society's annual exhibition is still on, and will be at the, use of the public all the week. Exports declare that the pannings by local artists are superior to the average. -Tho English mail which was despatched from Dunedin via Naples on the 25th oeptomhor arrived in London on the sth Inst, (five days late).

A Gisborne message states that the U'aerengaoknri Hotel, of 20 rooms, otrued by Mr W. ,T. Mossman, of Auckland, and leased by Mr H. Cooper, was destroyed by fire.

Speight’s ale and stout are acknowledged by iho Dominion public to be the best on the market,—[Advt.] Watson’s No. 10 is a little dearer than most which)as, but is worth the money.— [Advt.]

6170 Eczema Cure is recommended for eczema ana kindred troubles; 2s 6d box. Wilkinson and Son, chemists,—[Advt.] The Otago Mutual Starr-Bowkett Society will dispose of two appropriations of £SOO each at the secretary’s office on Friday evening.

No lady should be without Martin’s Apiol and Steel Pi.le. Sold by all chemists and stores throughout Australasia.—[Advt.] ' Tho alteration in the running of tho Palmerston train, referred to vestordav, conies into force on the Ist December.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141110.2.20

Bibliographic details

Evening Star, Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Word Count
1,584

Evening Star Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

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