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EGYPT QUIET.

THE SITUATION WELL IN HAND

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 9.

Egypt is quiet. Turkey’s attitude ta disapproved, and that blind devotion which might have influenced (ha Egyptians of the past is non-existent to-day. There is absolute, confidence in tlm capacity of the authorities to cope with any eventualities.

Tito strong measures adopted have gVeatly conduced to neutralise the activities of the agitators. Tho Princes Mohammed Alt, Aziz, and Uassan have been recommended, for health reasons, to spend tho winter in Europe, but Prince Hussein, who is actively supporting the, allied cause, remains in Egypt. According te> the Paris 4 Debats,’ tho Turkish Moslems are being taught to shout " Long live Hadje Mohammed Wilhelm 1”

THE AMENITIES OF WAR

(London ’Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 9,

A French cavalry officer writes that the trenches are only 50 metres apart, and that the Germans swear at them in the best Parisian slang. _ “ They have just sent a stinking old goat into our trenches, with posters all covered with coarse jokes.” The ‘Lokal Anzeiger’ acknowledges the gallantry of tho Gurkhas, but deprecates their methods of fighting. “Their sudden onslaught," says this semi-official paper, “is a lively reminder of the fighting methods of the tiger in the Indian jungle.

THE KAISER’S DAILY SPEECH.

ABANDONS GOD FOR FREDERICK

(London ' Times ’ and Sydney * Sun ’ Services.)

LONDON, November 9,

Tho German Press publish the Kaiser’s daily speeches which he delivers to the troops In the North of France. Each concludes with the declaration that the enemy are certain to be defeated. It is notable that these speeches no longer include" God, but pnjv Frederick tho Groat.

GERMAN PRISONERS.

(London ‘ Times ’ and Sydney ‘ Sun ’ Services.)

LONDON, November 9,

A German officer, unarmed and under a white flag, approached the Allies' lines and asked : Is it a fact that you shoot prisoners and cut off their cars?’’ A French officer having replied In the negative, the officer shortly after returned witli ICO Germans in a pitiable condition, and said: "You can have these men; they are no use to me.’’

DEATH OF MAJOR-GENERAL KEKEWICH'.

(London * Times ’ and Sydney 1 Suu ’ Services.)

LONDON. November 9.

At the, inquest on the body of Majorgeneral Kekewich it was stated that ho suffered from a groat wave of depression, owing to his inability to serve the country. A verdict of suicide while temporarily insane was returned.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141110.2.11.5

Bibliographic details

EGYPT QUIET., Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Word Count
401

EGYPT QUIET. Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

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