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BENGAL LANCERS.

CHARGE ON FOOT

GERMAN MARINES ROUTED

CALAIS. November 9

Detail? of the fighting at Ramscapelle show that when superior forces ot German marines, with naval guns, forced the Allies to evacuate Hamscapelie. 5.000 Bengal Lancers were sent to the rescue. They dismounted and charged with lances in hand. Cheers burst from the ranks of the allied infantry, who in turn dashed forward with their bayonets. The charge was irresistible.

T he German marines tied and sheltered in the village. Tho Allies forced open doors with liie butts of their rifles, and bayoneted many who were tiring from windows. Twelve naval guns were abandoned, and a thousand prisoners were token.

AROUND OSTEND

DEVASTATING SHELL FIRI

LONDON, November 8

German artillery reduced Perwyse, near 0.-tend, into a heap of bricks. The streets r.ro impassable, and the churches destroyed. Hundreds of shells made a ghastly spectacle of the cemetery, tearing out coffins from the earth and”scattering human remains.

ARMORED TRAINS.

USED BY BRITISH AT YPRES,

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ’Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 9.

‘The Times’s’ correspondent says that the bat'lle of Ypres demonstrated the utility of the British armored trains, which were a source of deep anxiety to tho enemy. Their shell fire was deadly. Tho heaps of dead in the evacuated position sinrl the broken batteries furnished a. tribute to the daring and resource, ot the men handling these monitors.

FRESH TROOPS NEEDED

TO TURN THE SCALE.

(London 'Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’Services.)

LONDON, November 8.

Officers arriving at Park? from tho front emphasise the need of fresh troops, on tho general view that the final victory will go to the side able to pul the greatest number of fresh, troops into the field.

DEATHS AND DESERTIONS.

ENEMY’S FRESH RESERVES

LONDON, November 8. During the last fortnight 20,000 German* were buried eix miles from Ghent. Their uniforms and accoutrements were removed and tent to Germany.

' German reservists are arriving at Ghent badly drested and equipped, many wearing civilian trousers, and some armed with old pattern rifles. The enemy’s deserters are paying big prices for Belgian workmen's clothes. M. Hilaire Belloc computes the German losses to date, including missing and sick, at 1,750.000.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141110.2.11.2

Bibliographic details

BENGAL LANCERS., Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

Word Count
362

BENGAL LANCERS. Evening Star, Issue 15646, 10 November 1914

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