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GERMAN HOSTS GOING EAST.

NEW ZEALANDERS IN SAMOA.

HEMMED IN ON FRONT AND BOTH FLANKS.

TOMMY ATKINS MAKES THEM RESPECT HIM.

ALLIES POSITIONS FIRMLY HELD.

REVERSES STIMULATE RECRUITING.

A PRIEST INVENTS WIRELESS WITHOUT POLES.

SHOWS IT TO OUR PEOPLE.

EMDEN NEARLY CAUGHT AT PENANG.

Press Association —3y Telegraph—Copyright.

GERMANS PASSING EASTWARD

AMSTERDAM. November 8 Received November 9. at 9 a.m.)

A RECRUITING CHART SHOWS THE BRITISH SPIRIT TO MEET EVERY REVERSE. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.) LONDON, November 8. An interesting chart has been prepared at Whitehall illustrative of the recruiting. It shows, that the call to arms moots with the best response ever known in times of disaster. The highest point was reached in tile blaek first week of September, when the Allies were retreating and the Gormans bad nearly reached tho gates of Paris. Tho indicator rose high towards the end of September, when tho three cruisers were sunk. It shot up again after the fall of Antwerp. Thrilling experiences followed each reverse, as shown hy tiio fluctuations on the chart-. Nothing could more finely show the spirit that animated onr people than tho immediate effect of sombre news from the front. Such news was an imptns to recruiting. A PR I EST’S INVENTION. WIRELESS WITHOUT POLES. SHOWN TO BRITISH. (London 'Times ’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.) ROME. November 8. A priest named Argcntierc gave a wireless demonstration at the British Embassy. He placed his apparatus in a corner of the room and received a. message from Reunion. Afterwards, hy means of an invention which renders a pole unnecessary. he intercepted a German Headquarters Staff message.

The local newspapers ,-tatc that many trainlo.Tls of German infantry, cavalry, and guns arc passing through Brussels mid Louvain towards. Germany. ENEMY HEMMED IN. PARIS, November 8. (Received November 9, at 9 a.m.) An eye. witness of the St Mihiel lighting says that the German losse,; were frightful. The Germans are now closely hemmed in on front and on both flanks. ALLIES FIRM ABOUT DIXMUDE.

ENEMY NOT SO ENERGETIC

FOG RESTRICTING ARTILLERY OPERATIONS.

PARTS, November 8. (Received November 9, at 11.25 a.m.)

A communique states that the action be tween the North Sea and Lys is le-ss violent.

We repulsed attacks towards Dixmudo and north-east of Ypres, and assumed the offensive all along this front. Tho advance is notable north of Messines.

The British progressed slightly around Armetuieres.

The enemy’s attacks between La Basseo and Arras were repulsed. We have markedly advanced around Soissons, and consolidated our advances in the Vailly region and north of Chavonne and Soupir. We are organising the points d'appui which wo recently captured near Verdun. A thick fog over the northern area, also in Champagne and Lorraine, is restricting the artillery and the aviators G ERMANS GLAD TO SCR REN DEL IF COULD SAVE THEIR FACES. (Loudon ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun ’Services.) LONDON, November 8. Ascertaining that a German force occupied the Forest of I’erroy, two French cavalry regiments, carrying mitrailleuses on horseback, fruitlessly sought the enemy during a whole nigfit. Suddenly, in the morning, the French stumbled upon a German outpost, who surrendered, saying they wore tired of the hardships and long marches, and would gladly surrender it they could save their faces. Later the main body of the French came in contact with the enemy. The Germans started firing into the air. The French, failing to grasp the meaning of this manauvre. charged with drawn sabres, and in face of a fierce, fire, pressed the charge home, killing 400, while 350 surrendered and the rest, fled in confusion. GERMANS TAKE HOSTAGES FOR SAFETY OF RAILWAYS. PARIS, November 3. (Received Novemlier 9, at 9 a.m.) General Von dor Goltz has issued a proclamation at Brussels stating that hostages have been taken in all towns near railway* that are. liable to damage, and that they will be shot if any damage is attempted. GETTING SICK OF IT. “TOMMY” HAS MADE THEM RESPECT HIM. LONDON, November 8. (Received November 9, at 8.40 a.m.) Evidence is accumulating that German officers are driving then - men forward. A dead officer was fjrund with a dogwhip in one hand and a revolver in the other. German soldiers, when facing the British, gladly use any opportunity to escape. The British found many Gormans hanged on trees. HUNDREDS OF BRITISH INTERNED. AMSTERDAM, November 8. (Received November 9, at 9 a.m.) The internment of the British of military age, in Germany is proceeding rapidly. Tho internments include 2,000 at Hamburg and 130 at Frankfort. (IE RM ANS SHELL AET E LI) H0 S - PITAL, NOT KNOWING WE HAD THEIR MEN THERE. LONDON, November 8. (Received November 9, at 8.40 a.m.) During tho recent fighting in tho north tho Allies’ Red Cross corps picked up 700 wounded Germans, and removed them to a field hospital, which the Germans shelled during the night, not knowing that Germans were within. The damage was small. UN PEI NTABL E DOINGS OF THE GERMANS. LONDON, November 8. (Received November 9, at 9 a.m.) * The Times ’ states that Prince Charles of Hohenzollern, who is King Albert’s brother-in-law, superintended the removal of the furniture from a looted house at Brussels.

WANT TO KNOW WHERE THE METAL IS GOING.

MELBOURNE, November 9. (Received; November 9, at 9.15 a.m.) Tlie military authorities raided tho offices of a number of metal companies and seized books and documents. It Is understood that the object was to ascertain the disposal of metals since the. war broke out. GERMAN CRUISERS. E.MDEN NEAR PENANG. BOLTS FROM BRITISH CRUISER. PERTH, November 9. tßeceived November 9, at 9.15 a.m.) The steamer Paroo, which has arrived from Singapore, reports that a British cruiser sighted the Emdon near Penang. Tim Emdr-n was coaling from two storeships. She, lirilted- when sighted. The cruiser sank one of the storeships and captured the other, a Greek collier.

A German naval reserve lieutenant was aboard this collier. ’Replying to a suggestion tha.t the Emden’s successful raids wem due to someone aboard who was acquainted with the Eastern trade routes, this lieutenant declared : " I'm the man.” (iOEISKX AT CONSTANT!NOPLE. (London ‘Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.) CONSTANTINOPLE, November 8. The Goeheu and her consorts have arrived, having escaped an encounter with the Russian warships. GIER WATCHED BY JAPANESE. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.) WASHINGTON, November 8. In order to give the gunboat Gier a chance of avoiding the Japanese cruisers, the date on which oho is ordered to leave is to be kept secret for five. days.

HEALTH GOOD.—THIRT—.N IN HOSPITAL DOING WELL.

[Per United Press Association.]

WELLINGTON. November 9. The following, dated November 8, has been received hy the Governor from the Administrator of Samoa :

The health of the troops is good

Artillery: Privates Hatch and Jones are down with dysentery. Railway Engineers : Bngnnll, Cameron, and' M‘Don aid. Thomas Burns (Auckland regiment), and Corporal Hewitt with fever; Boyne with bronchitis: Hay with dysentery; Owen with rheumatism : and of the Wellington regiment Laurence has had septic poisoning of the knee. Rogers fever, and Boddington dysentery. All are now doing well. BRITISH TRADE DECREASE. OVER £4O.CCO.CCO FOR THE MONTH. LONDON. November 8. (Received November 9, at 8.55 a.in.) British imports decreased last month £20,170.887, the exports £18,020,884, and the re-exports £2,376,287.

NEW ZEALAND EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.

LONDON ENROLMENTS.

When tho last mail left tho' following ex-Otagans had enrolled to join the New Zealand Expeditionary Force on its arrival in London:—Thomas Moore Bnlfin, Lawrence; James Hampden Cook, Oamaru; Sydney Black Crawford, Dunedin; Thomas John Hirst Drysdale, Port Chalmers; Robert Chapman Dunn, Dunedin; Harry Arthur Foote, Dunedin: Alfred Onslow Glasse, Dunedin; Norman K. T. Low, Dunediu; Alexander Adair Mblaster, Oamaru; Charles Edward May, Dunedin; Lionel Clare F. Neill, Dunedin; Edgar George Seelye, Dunedin; Herbert Hamilton Scott, Dunedin; Charles Wallace Saunders, Dunedin; Ernest Vincent Smith, ' Dunediu; Albert Richard Turner* Dunedin; Gerdhardt Adolphus Chapman Ulrich, Dunedin. Some of tho men served with the New Zealand contingents In South Africa.

* The Times ’ adds that a Belgian nobleman, who was allowed to search tho Brussels depot, foand there 200 packing cases full of plunder, and that the conduct of the Germans who occupied the houses was such as cannot be mentioned in print. NEW G-ERMAN DODGE. SOLDIERS IN PETTICOATS. PARIS, November 8. (Received November 9, at 9 a.m.) A new German ruse is to have soldiers working in the fields in women’s attire. Tho French shelled a number of grenadiers, who were disguised ae potato pickers.

HISTORIC SCENE IN THE COMMONS. .

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM SONG.

It was Mr Will Crooks, the Labor member for Woolwich, who was responsible for the singing of the National Anthem when the. Imperial Parliament prorogued. Tile historic scone is thro described, by the ‘Daily Telegraph’; “Mr Deputy-Speaker, would in order to sing ‘ God Save the King ’’ The voice was that of Mr Will Crooks. The scene was the House of Commons. Mr Wihitley, the Deputy-Speaker, had just, road out tha King’s Speech—after hearing Jt read in tho House of Lords by the Load Chancellor—and members were rising to go. Astonishing request! But then Mr Will Crooks is an astonishing personality. Mr Whitley was evidently taken aback. He is a severe precisian, a rigorous formalist. A member wanted to sing! The thing was unprecedented. He next might bo wanting to dance. And yet, how rule th© National Anthem out of order ! Usually Mr WTiitlev can flash an answer to any question, .however disconcerting. But in this case he was palpably at a loss. If Mr Crooks felt like singing ‘God Save tbo King,’ what was he to do? While he ttoed considering, Ministers looked at one another in a puzzled way. Who should start tho anthem? Mr Crooks took heart of grace. Without Availing for leave 1m started tho song himself. Nervous and quivering tho first familiar notes came forth. For one horrid second it seemed as if the singer might collapse in a, deplorable fiasco. But then some stronger voice chimed in heroically, and hy a fraction of a second the situation was saved.

' God Save Our Gracious King.’ In a twinkling members wen; on their feet, and tho grand old anthem rolled up to the roof, and the. strangers m the public gallery caught up the refrain. And why not ‘ God Save tho King.’ after such a true kingly message as members had just listened to, and why not, the “Hip, hip. hoorah!'’ Again it. was Mr Will Crooks who !cd the cheering in endorsement of his stirring vmrds! it, was a bravo sight to see. the Labor members standing there singing' and cheering. And the Nationalists, too, with Mr Redmond at, their head—an inspiriting seem*. And ail because Mr Will Crooks had had a lump in his throat, as he beard the King’s brave words on the war and had felt like singing. Nor was that. all. When the <■) iccrs were over, Mr Crooks, as a last word at, parting, called out, “God Save Ireland!”

“.And God Save England, too!" cried a Nationalist, M.P in response, as he came down the gangway step.*. It was Mr Redmond. Not a doubt of it. (Hear and ringing tho accent. Unmistakable the. tone. No one remembers the National Anthem having been sung in the House of Gammons Before. But sung it was, and sung with fervor, and all the circumstances of the day—the war, the King's Speech, the end of a memorable sesr.ion. the last stage of the Horne Rule Bill, and the first Bills carried by the Parliament Act—combined to make the episode memorable.

PORT CHALMERS WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION.

The Port Chalmers Women's Association forwarded cake, etc., to the Dunedin branch for distribution at afternoon tea. at the Art Gallery exhibition on Saturday. Donations in cash and goods include £BO from the Port Chalmers branch n{ the Overseas Club, being half proceeds of concert. “THANK COD.” THE KAISER S SPEECH. According to English newspapers, the ‘ Cologne Gazette' nqiorted recently that the KaiVev delivered a speech after the fight at Virion, near Longwy. on the occasion of his viril to his ecu. prince. Oscar, win. is commanding the Kaiser's Grenadier Regiment. The regiment was quartered in a hostile village. Towards e.vcning it jvm announced that the Kaiser would visit it. A few minutes later he appeared with his suite, in five automobilee. The Kaiser embraced and kissed his son, and theiUwalked down the lines of the regiment. greeting the men. Going into the middle of tho square, he addressed them as follows : “I go et you as your chief, and I thank you for what you have. done. I have a heady often seen your regiment un parade and at, manoeuvres, and it is a particular pie.; -urc to me to greet you on conquered land. Tho regiment has fought as I expected, am! as your fathers in 1871 fought. The battle of Virton will be eternally inscribed in letters of gold in the history of the war. When the regirnont departed I expressed the hope that it would fight as onr fathers did at Weis-enberg and Wocrts. Our comrades of the eastern army also have already fought gallantly under General Itindenhurg; also the army of the Crown Prince and the Fourth Army under Duke Vibert. of Wurieniberg have advanced victoriously. And our enemies are withdrawing in flight. The easlcnn army has driven throe 1 Lucian corps, over the frontier, Iwo Russian mi ps have capitulated on the open field, and 60,000 men, with two generals, are prisoners of war. For all those victories we have to thank One, and that is onr old God, who is over ue." DUNEDIN WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION. 1 hanks to the voluntary assistance rendered by three gentlemen on Saturday afternoon, a largo number of cases were packed and got. ready for shipping to Britain and Belgium. The committee would remind everyone who has art union tickets to sell that all blocks and remnants must bo returned hy the 17th inst.

Mr H. C. Campbell has kindly given the services for a week of one of hia expert p,n iters. This help ia valuable and much appreciated. The commitieo are also grateful to the Port Chalmers ladies, who sent up cakes, etc., for Saturday afternoon’s tea at the art exhibition. Local ladies also donated refreshments. The tea, which was well patronised, will ho provided each Wednesday and Saturday so long as the exhibition lasts.

The girls of the millinery workroom at the D.i.C. have sent .along a second large parcel of goods for the British and Belgian fund.

Gifts for all the funds continue to come in steadily.

MORE GERMAN CHARGES REFUTED.

Ju an interview granted to the correspondent of a. Copenhagen .(taper, Francis D. A laud. Parliamentary I’lidcr-Sccretary for Foreign Affairs, refutes certain statements made hy tiie German Secretary of State, Herr Von Jagovv, in an interview recently issued at Berlin “that England has provoked poor Belgium to make resistance.”

“This leaves it to he inferred,” says Mr Achtnd, “ that Belgium, if unprovoked, would really have allowed herself to ho trampled upon. It, might have been thought flint the nature of the resistance offered by Belgium would he. enough to prevent such a libel on a gallant foe. An official statement issued by the Belgian Government conclusively proves that no provocation from England or anybody else was needed to make Belgium maintain Iter rights. 'Hie Belgian Government, at the time of the Agadir crisis, did not hesitate to warn the foreign Ambassador in terms which could not be misunderstood of its intention to compel respect for the neutrality of Belgium by every means at its disposal.” The Under-Secretary calls attention to Herr Von Jagow’s statement that Germany did not violate Belgium's neutrality until the night of August 3-4. But on August 2, he says, Sir Edward Grey, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs,' promised the French Ambassador the full support of tho English fleet if the German fleet attacked the French coast. “The German Minister," comments Mr Acland, “suppresses the facts that already on July 31 Sir Edward Grey had asked the French and German Governments if they were prepared to agree to respect the neutrality of Belgium; that France immediately gave the -required agreement ; that Herr Von Jagowi said he could not answer, and that the answer ultimately received was ‘No.’"

BELATED NEWS. The cables on Saturday last told, us that H.M.S. 'Cumberland had bagged eight German vessels. This reads very like stale news, though it is the first advice sent to New Zealand of anything in regard to th© Cumberland's doings. From the Saturday ‘Westminster Gazette’ of October 5 we take the following;—At sea the past week has given us no news from the North iS'ea—which is good news. Wo say that not because wo fear the resuit of any engagement between the two High Fleets, hut because wo are doing well all the time so ]o*ig as our present naval supremacy remains unimpaired. Each aide has scored one in what may be called cruiser “ liveliness." First came the news that the Emden had succeeded in bagging font more British ships. All ,the four were duly sunk, but ail the crews were saved and put on board a fifth steamer, which was spared and sent with the crews on board to Colombo. That was playing the game as it should be played, and wo could only wish that the same careful and even chivalrous conduct marked German warfare everywhere. The day after the news came of the Emden’s bag a pleasant retort in kind came in an Admiralty statement, which told us that H.M.S. Cumberland had captured nine German merchant steamers, of a combined tonnage of 31,000 tons, off the Cameroon River. The vessels arc in good older, most of them having cargoes of considerable quantities of coal. Nor is this the total sum of the Cumberland's achievements. The German gunboat Sodcn has boon captured and added to our Navy, whilst it is expected that the boating dock of the Hertzogin Elizabeth, which had been sunk, can Ire raised. A very admirable and pertinent reply to the doings of the Emden, upon which Captain Cyril Fuller, the commander of the Cumberland, is decidedly to bo congratulated. Neither series of captures, as it is hardly necessary to add. can lx; said to affect the main problem of warfare by sea. It would bo foolish to boast as to the future, but thus far our Navy has proved itself a “surer shield" than , iven the wannest advocates of the doctrine of eea power ever dared to hope.

THE EOSS-SHIANS. A plausible story of the. origin of Russian rumor is told in Scotland. A train with Seaforths passed through Yorkshire in the night, ana stopped at a small wayside station, where only a sleepy porter was on duly. Some of the kilties got out ill their long great coats, and as they stumped about the platform they talked their native tongue—the Gaelic. "Where do you come from?” asked the porter. “ Rose-shire," was the answer. Lot any Scot, Highland or Lowland, say Eossshire (remarks the Glasgow ‘Herald’), and nine out of 10 Englislnr.cn will imagine ho means “Russia.” TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS. The following officers and non-commis-sioned officers have been appointed to temporarily replace those who have gone away with the Otago quota of the Expeditionary Force :—Major O. H. Moller (Otago Infantry Regiment) and Captain Shand (Fifth Regiment) to the Staff Corps in Dunedin ; Lieutenant T. E. Christian (on unattached list), to Bluff; Lieutenant W. .T. Bevis, to Ranfurly ; Lieutenant David Bell, to Balcliitha; Lieutenant Bracks, to Mosgiel; Sergeants Wm. M'Lean, James Shand. and Wm. Dobson, to Dunedin ; Sergeants Monteith and Miller, to Invercargill; Sergeants A. H. Hudson, R. C. Whyte, James A. Fraser, and ,1. M‘Gregor, to Oamarn; and Sergeants A. E. “ Stevens, J. 11. Stechman, and R. M. Davis, to Milton. “HUMANE” GERMANS. There is at present in London Hospital an officer of the Lancaster Regimest, who, with four wounded men ol his regiment, endeavored to escape from German custody. He relates that on tho way- they met a party of Germans, whom they hoped to capture, but they were, hopelessly outnumbered. Tho Germans fired upon them, but failed to register a hit, and the gallant five sought refuge in a farm. Here they were discovered by the enemv, who blew up the farmhouse and killed I lie four men. I'hc officer was rendered unconscious by a huge beam falling upon him, and when he regained consciousness ho asked a German officer who was standing near to have ir, removed. Although the officer was suffering agony the Gorman officer only laughed snec-ringiy at him, and placed 'a soldier as sentry over him. In this position he remained for three days without food or drink, and at the end of that time (the Germans, having left) was found hy our won men. who at once, removed him to hospital. An illuminating glimpse of the obse.-sion of the German mind is afforded in one of the letters raptured at the front, and written home hy a German soldier. He tells of the death of a Frcncli Boy Scout, “a poor young billow who, in lib infatuation, wanted to be a hero." and whom ho describes as a. “traitor";

The German column was passing along a wooded defile, and ho was « aught and

asked whether the French were about. He refused to give information. Fifty yards further on there was tiro from tire cover of a wood. The prisoner was a-kivi in French if he had known that (In l enemy were in the forest, and did not deny it. 1:1 c went with a firm step to a telegraph post, and stood up against it. with the green vineyard at hic> hack, and received the volley of the firing party with a. proud smile on hi* face. Infatuated wretch! It was a. pity to fee such wafted courage. And this boy’s solo offence was that he refused to t.c-11 the German invaders where the soldiers of his country wore! ODDMENTS. '• We cherish no doubt that when peace is signed it will ho found that the whole colonial empire which has been built up hy the present Kaiser and those about him will have passed into other hands.—‘ Saturday Westminster Gazette.’

Brigadier-general Davies, of New Zealand, has been invalided homo from the front, and is at present in due of the London hospitals. Mr Wilfrid Findlay, son of Sir John Findlay, and Mr Callender, son of the general malinger of tho Bank of New Zealand, have joined the Artists’ Corps in London. Mr Sydney Watson, formerly of George street, Dunedin, has joined the 7t.lt Australian Army Service Corps with the rank of sergeants A battalion of colonial infantry, nearly 700 strong, has been linked with the. force raised lev the Mayor of Kensington (Ixtndon). On reaching the front it vvii! he attached to the Royal Fusiliers, and lw known as the Imperial Battalion of that regiment. Its commander is Major Iniifis. D.5.0., of the Sussex Yeomanry, who was thrice mentioned in South African despatches. Capt:un_ Halsey. C.M.G., commander of ILM.S, New Zealand, lias been appointed a naval aido-do-camp to the King, vice Captain Singer, promoted to flag rank. Mr J. T. Pemberton, erstwhile of Dunedin. has joined the Red (Voss Society and been sent on service in France.

“An Admirer of Belgium’’ sends u? 15s for our Belgian fund. The Nestle and Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company have suffered a very heavy loss owing to the Germans seizing *£Bo,ooo worth of chocolate, etc., which was in transit in barges on the Rhino for shipment. This firm (who employ thousands of hands in London! invited all their male employees from 18 to 30 to join tho colors for act!vo service, and the response was a great surprise, for the hands offered in a body, and caused dislocation of business. The* firm are keeping all positions open, and the men will receive full pay whilst on active service.

Wo have received from the officers and members of the Otago Model Yacht Club £4 for the relief of the Belgians, £4 for the Red Cross fund for onr Expeditionary Force, and £4 for the local distress fund.

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Bibliographic details

GERMAN HOSTS GOING EAST., Issue 15645, 9 November 1914

Word Count
4,021

GERMAN HOSTS GOING EAST. Issue 15645, 9 November 1914

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