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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

PRINCIPAL AUSTRIAN ARMY RETREATING.

BELGIANS SAVE YSER POSITION.

Press Association—By Telegraph—Copyright.

PARTS, November 7.

Official: The Germans are counterattacking tho Belgians, who advanced along the right bank of the User from Nieuport to Lombartzyde, but the Belgians were supported in time, and the situation on that side was completely restored. Marines repelled the counterattack at Dixmude. We progressed around Bixshovte.

* The British again assumed the offensive south-east of Ypres. and defeated a particularly violent attack hy a recentlyarrived army enqis. 'lho British also repulsed violent attacks at Nenyv Chapel!. l . We stopped several day and night counterattacks netween the La Bassets Canal and Arras.

Between Arras ami the Disc we slightly progressed at Vormouilles and south rf Aix Noulette. We continue to gain the ground recently lost at. Vailly. We repelled fresh attacks at Argonne. where we progressed at several points rmd occupied IFarhourt and Xogeville, The enemy were unsuccessful in their attacks on the heights of the Meuse south-east of Verdun. In the Aprenmnt Forest, southeast of St. Mihiel, we carried a few trenches at St. Remy.

The Germarts suffered considerable losses attacking the approaches from Grand Couronne to Nancy. A German coup de main against the heights dominating Gold and St. Marie completely failed.

ALLIES ATTACKING AT YPRES

PARIS. November 7.

Official: The battle in the north is as /iolent as ever. Our offensive cast and lonth of Yprcs continues. We repulsed attacks from Arras to the Oise, and have retaken Sonpea, near Vailly. The German attacks in the Argonne continue to ho violent but resultless. Wo have carried trenches on the heights of the Mease and also east of Verdun.

GERMANS SURRENDERING

PARIS. November 7. Official: Many Germans have been taken prisoners along the whole front. In some cases complete units have surrendered. Two detachments surrendered at Lens , daring a thick fog. Some of the officers and men declared that they were weary of hardships and content to be well treated.

GERMAN VETERANS DEFEATED

PARIS, November 7.

Tho German corps defeated south-east of Ypres consisted of first line troops sent to reinforce the reserves.

KAISER WITNESSES HIS DEFEAT,

PARIS, November 7.

Before tho Yser inundation the Kaiser appeared on tho right bank and exhorted the troops to recapture the positions on the other bank. The Wnrtemberg Regiment volunteered, and waded thigh-deep into the water, when Belgian sharpshooters accounted for tho entire regiment. Mout of the wounded were drowned. The Kaiser surveyed the ghastly sight through his field-glasses.

GERMANS WITHDRAWING FROM

YPRES,

PARIS, November 7.

The German withdrawal from Y’pres has begun. The British advance began on Wednesday, and several miles were gained on Thursday. There was fierce fighting in the La Bassee region, where a large French force successfully resisted tho German efforts to break through coastwards. ALLIES’ DOGGED ADVANCE. The High Commissioner reports, under date London, November 7:— Official: The enemy's attacks have derreaaed in vigor. In tho process of pressing them back we aro making slow but steady progress. Tho advanco is most marked south of Dixmudo and towards Gheleweldt, but tho misty weather tended to hamper our operations.

DETERMINED FIGHTING ON WHOLE FRONT.

The Prime Minister has received the following from the High Commissioner, dated London, November 6 (6.45 p.m.).

Paris reports that there was no appreciable change during yesterday. Along the whole front fighting continues on the same scale as before between Dixmude and Lys without marked advance or retirement. There is violent cannonading to the north of Arras without a stop. The German effort in Belgium and the north of Franco is proloncgcf. The Germans seem about to make changes in the composition of their forces operating in these regions and to be reinforcing their reserve forces (which have been so severely handled) with active troops, in order to attempt a new offensive or counter-attacks. Sanguinary defeats have heen inflicted upon them between the Somme and the Oise and between the Oise and the Meuse in detailed actions fought. A column of German waggons was destroyed by our artillery in the region of Napoel, near Bcrry-au-Bao. We have retaken the village of Sapignul, which the Germans had captured, by desperate fighting. We have also taken a place in the Argonno region, where, by bayonet actions, our troops repulsed the Germans. In the Woevro district fresh attacks by the enemy were repulsed.

ENEMY LOSE HEAVILY NEAR ROLLERS.

LONDON, November 8,

The Rotterdam correspondent of the ‘Courant’ stalest that tho Germans have suffered terrible losses south-east of Roulers. The Allies’ projectiles are deadly. One wounded man declared that the Gormans are using the dead and wounded as shields, and tne shrieks of tho wounded thus used wo heart-rending. ** The Germans destroyed so many of the Belgian buildings on the line oS advance that not half enough remain to accommodate their own wounded, and incessant trainloads of wounded are passing eastwards. The French buried 3,000 dead after repelling the latest attack at Grand Cottrorme. ■WOMEN BURYING THE DEAD. PARIS, November 8. Germans at Rove requisitioned all the women, and marched them 30 miles to a forest, where, daring the whole night, tmdar the fire of French shells, they compalled them to bury tho German dead, carrying the corpses on their shoulders 300 yds to where the trenches provided ready-made graves. When the women fell exhausted the soldiers pricked them with their bayonets and kicked them until thtfv rose up and resumed. At daybreak the* girls and women were feebly crawling on the ground, 'dragging corpses by the Jf«t* and. anno.

GERMANS TRICKED AT ARRAS.

PARIS, November 7. The Germans were induced to make u great effort at Arras on Monday by a French artifice. Air scouts revealed the fact that there was German concentration between Lens and Douai. The French evacuated all the villages north of Arras, pretending to have abandoned the town. A German aviator was allowed to reconnoitre unhindered. Twelve, thousand Germans entered Arras, tho band playing. Hardly bad they begun to pass the Scarp bridge when volleys were fired from neighboring houses, and machine guns simultaneously opened a deadly tire on tho flanks and rear of the German columns. A battalion of guards rushed forward in the hope of getting beyond the ambuscade, but the French Dragoons charged and the guards surrendered bodily. The remainder of the enemy retreated, but a military train with a 17in howitzer and a crew of Krupp engineers was captured through an aeroplane destroying the line.

ST. RE MY CAPTURED

PARIS, November 8.

Official: Midnight German attacks all along the front were repulsed. We captured at the bayonet point the village of .St. Remy, on the heights of the Meuse,

ENEMY SUFFERING SEVERELY

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 7.

‘ The Times’s' correspondent at Flushing says that all the scraps of news obtainable indicate that things are going favorably to the Allies, and the increasing anxiety on the part of the Germans to prevent the circulation of news is in itself a hopeful sign. Life is getting more and. more unpleasant. Tho German soldiers are growing rough and overbearing, «» if their temper is giving way. From every direction comes the same tale of a constant and ternhle stream of wounded {touring in hy trainloads, ronvoys, and motor vehicles, while there is a continuous stream of limping and bandaged men along the road.

FRENCH BOMB SAVES POSITION ON THE OISE.

PARIS, November 8,

One thousand German infantrymen and two squadrons of Uhlans crossed the biidgc over the Oise and drove a regiment of infantry, a squadron of hussars, and a cyclist section into a village commanding the roads to Chaqlnes and Peronne. While, the fight was in progress a French airman's bomb destroyed the bridge, cutting off the Germans. Meanwhile the French were reinforced. They annihilated the Germans, and, throwing a pontoon across the river, joined tile other forces from Offremont .and captured Tracy-Lcval.' RED CROSS FIRED ON. LONDON, November 7. Mr Donohue, in his account of affairs in Belgium, says ; "In the fighting at Armentieres and Arras the enemy's attack was completely shattered, and whole divisions of Germans were practically wiped out. Only 40 and a corporal survived out of one full regiment. The country round Armentieres is full of nnburied German dead, while l the wounded are left at the Allies' mercy. The unchivalrous enemy fired on the Rod Cross that was succoring them, and Germans from the tree-tops sniped at the stretcher-bearers. Ultimately machine guns fired at the tree-tops and brought down 20 sharpshooters.

The Britishers captured isolated bands of Germans who had been subsisting on raw horseflesh. They eagerly surrendered. The cold mists sweeping over Flanders greatly affect the Germans, and disease is making inroads upon them.

GERMANS DRIVEN BY OFFICERS.

LONDON, November 7.

Mr Donohue, continuing hi& narrative eays it is clear that if the Germans had stayed they must-have been annihilated by the Trench. An advance was ordered, but the men were disinclined to face the hellish ordeal. The officers vainly kicked and beat them. Suddenly the British artillery and rifle fire ceased; the men left their trenches with fixed bayonets, and charged the Germans, who fired a single voPcy and then went- right about. One line with bayonets sought to cover tho retreat, hut the British, cheering, closed with them, and soon there was a seething mass of men in death grips, thrusting and parrying. The line broke, and it wn-s clear that the Germans were lunning. They rallied round a mortar, and a desperate hand-to-hand conflict ensued ; but the British captured the gnu.

GERMANY'S NEW MILLION

THE HAGUE. November 8.

From competent and unprejudiced sources in Germany it is stated that. Germany is easily able to tend another million to the front. Advices from Cologne arc to the effect that 150,000 troops arc concentrating at Minster, and going to Belgium.

HEAVY GUNS BROUGHT UP

LONDON, November 7.

Rotterdam newspapers state that 60 motor machine guns passed Aix-In-Chap-elle westwards, also 40 heavy guns, which arc believed to be going to Arras.

THE ROAD TO BOULOGNE

PARIS.

November 7.

The eitu.ition between Lille and Arrae i« still obscure. It is mainly an artillery duel, with little advantage on either side. The Allies are strenuously opposing an attempt to advance along the direct road to Boulogne.

AEROPLANES ACTIVE

AMSTERDAM. November 7,

French airmen missed the oil tanks at Bruges, but killed eight marines. They also destroyed a section of the Bruges Zeebrugge tramway. Six aeroplanes participated in an attack on Thick when the Kaiser escaped. About 20 civilians were killed.

BIG GUNS AT WORK

AMSTERDAM, November 7,

There is heavy cannonading in the neighborhood of Thournut and Ypres. .and alsr Roulcrs and Hooledgc. and tno wounded ate streaming into Bruges.

THE ENEMY’S DEAD

PARIS, November 7,

Four thousand Belgians aro engaged burving German corpses'. It is estimated that there were 3,7C0 (?) German dead around Dismude.

AN EYE-WITNESS CONTINUES

WELLINGTON. November 7.

The following message has been received bvthe Prime Minister from the High Commissioner :

Official: The account communicated by an eve-witness with the General Headquarters' Staff continues the narrative of tho movement of tho force and tho French armies in immediate touch with the enemy , . In spite of the great Jossce suffered in the attacks last week, the Germans continued the offensive towards the west almost continuously during the five days from October 25 to 30. Opposite us it has eraduallv grown In intensity and extent of application as men and guns have been brought up and pushed into the fight. It has developed into the most bitterly-con-t«‘ted battle that has been fought in tho western theatre. The German artillery has been increased by the transfer of siege trims from Antwerp. As regards the infantry, it is possible that some additional treepe have oeen rendered available by the relaxation of the pressure against tho ■Ub“s north, of Ypres caused by the desire; ate and successful resistance made, and latierlv bv tic harassing nature of the aitillcrv fire brought, to bear by our ships. against the strip oi country along the ouKjtg jwid Uu* ilcoding, of the area of the

Yser. Forces have been massed also from 1 the south, ..whilst another new army corps has definitely made its dehut, though thi attempts to hack their way through made in other directions have been seriously concentrated upon the neighborhood of Y pros. On the 96th, south of Lys, 'on our right, the enemy attacked Ntuvo Chapelle, which was held by us. In the evening, advancing under cover of a wood, they managed to gain possession of a portion north of Lys. In the centre the fight was confined to bombardment, and we kept tho ground made hy us. A detached post, which was attacked in force during tho night, drove back their assailants, who left 56 dead behind thorn.

Near our leit the Germans developed very strong attacks in tho legion of outline east of Ypres. Though supported by great masses of artillery this was checked. It had two results. One was that our position was readjusted: the other that our extreme loft alone advanced in conjunction with 'others of our Allies. On Tuesday the Germans rather focussed their principal attention upon our right and centre. At the right tho most desperate fighting took place for the possession of Nouve Chapelle. In spite of repeated counter-attacks by tho British, the enemy managed to hold the northern part of the village, which they had gained thc day before. Towards the evening we regained the greater part of this, step by slop, fighting all the time, when fresh hostile reinforcements wore brought up and the entire village was captured by the enemy. They made several assaults against tho whole of the front south of Lys, but with the exception of their success at Neuve Chapelle they won no advantage. The combat for the place was of a most murderous description, and it is believed that the enemy’s losses in. this quarter of the field were very groat.

An artillery officer, observing their advance, reports that the effects of our rillc and gun fire were stupendous. The Germans had to throw corpses of their own men out of the trendies to obtain cover. Four successive attacks were made, each hy a different regiment, and in this way the whole of one division was engaged piecemeal about the same locality. The last of these regiments was practically disposed of. According to prisonem their condition is deplorable.

North of the river our centre was subjected to a heavy she'll tire. Our guns were by no means idle. One of our patrols found 11 Germans dead, and one rendered unconscious by tiie fumes caused by the form in which our Ivddite shri.s detonate.

Towards our left the readjustment of the line commenced on Monday, and a com pleto redistribution of strength has been effected on the extreme left. Ground' was gained at Neuvc Uhapclle against desperate fighting, our Indian troops greatly distinguishing themselves. By a. wed-con-ducted counter-attack they drove tt.e Germans out of the greater part of the place, with the bayonet. Emerging horn the Milage, however, they were exposed to a concentrated fire from machine guns, and had to remain content with what llvy had gained.

Further left the enemy male attaiks under cover of the usual heavy bombardment, but each effort was repulsed with great slaughter. One of our trenches was carried, and then recovered after a kies of 200 dead had been inflicted on tho enemy. On the, extreme left our advance was not pressed, am. the enemy remained in possession of Berelair. A night attack by them was repulsed. Next to the centre the preatest pressure was on our two flanks. South of Lys, against the right, the Germans delivered an assault which failed. In front of one battalion it is estimated that they loft between 600 and 700 dead, whilst the trench which they penetrated was recaptured by us at a cost to them of 70 killed and 14 prisoners. A few Germans surrendered voluntarily.

In this quarter wo experienced for the first time in the northern theatre of action the “ minewerfa.’' or trench mortar. It has a range of some 500 yards., and throws a bomb loaded with a high explosive, weighing 2001b, which is fired at an extreme elevation from a bomb pit in a trench. At midnight our line was attacked in two places. One did not mature, as the ground was well swept by our guns. In the other case the assault was directed against one of our brigades by a force of some 12 battalions. With great self-restraint our men held their lire for 40 minutes, until the attackers got quite close to them, and then drove them back with a loss of 200 killed. The enemy penetrated portions of our trenches, but were driven out again, losing 800 men killed and captured. A really important feature of this day’s operations north of the Lys consisted of an onslaught in great force in the morning in the. direction of Yprcs. After a heavy cannonade, the assault was driven home and a portion of our front was forced hack by tho evening. The lost giound was, however, recovered, and in [daces more than recovered, with the exception of one point, to which the enemy clung. Our losses were heavy, but not so revere as those of the enemy, who at one spot suffered tremendously from tho concentrated fire of our masted machine gnus. Ou the 30th I witnessed renewed efforts against our right, but without, success to the enemy. In the centre the bombardment was heavy, and so many shells fell round our position that tho telephone wires were frequently cut. The attack in tho direction of Ypres was generally renewed south-east of that town. Inc enemy pressed forward in great force, and in places our linee were again forced back a short distance; but on our left coming on the Germans were stopped by our entanglements under a. close ritio fire, and alter two efforts to advance gave way.

On the 51st a most determined attack was made on our left and left centra, the pressure being specially severe against tho latter portion of our position. Part of our line was driven back temporarily by sheer weight of metal and -numbers, but was almost all recovered again before night. Against our centre tho enemy did not advance, whilst against our right they were not nearly so active as further north. So far, with the assistance of the French, who have been co-operating most effectually, we succeeded in maintaining our line and in retaining possession of Ypres, upon tho capture of which by the end of October the Germans had sot their heart. The fighting during the past live days was of a must, desperate natuic. U was evidently a. soklieis' battle, and without exaggeration or undue self-congratula-liou our men behaved splendidly in the lace of heavy odds and again.-t, repeated onslaughts. Great nuif -cs v.e:e continually replaced by fresh men, and were hacked by almost continuous tire from an immense, concentration of -mis. They have hy dogged resistance well uphold the icputation of our army. Heavy as have been our losses, wo have taken a far heavier toll from the enemy. Our French Allies are fighting with all file dash for which they aro famous. At Dixmude, along the Yscr they made a name for themselves which will never die. Tho Belgians, likewise, resisted furious onslaughts with the inmost gallantry. 'JTie Gennan troops won our rcej/cet for Inc way in which they advanced. Whether it be due to patriotism or to fear induced by iron discipline, the fact remains, that they have steadily pressed on to what in many cases must obviously havn been certain death. A wounded German soldier states: My section received orders to go forward to attack. The officers warned us that if wo gave way fire would be opened upon us from behind. This was carried into effect when the losses we suffered compelled us to retire. A German bullet wounded me/’ Our airmen Harass the advancing hostile columns by a bomb-dropping machine and gun fire. The tactical transfer of troops behind the Gennan front line is now carried out to a great extent by motor omnibuses.

RUSSIAN VICTORY IN GALICIA

PARIS,

November 7.

Tho Tsar has telegraphed to General Joffre announcing a Russian victory in Galicia, the most important in the eastern theatre since the beginning of the war.

WELLINGTON. November 8

High. Commissioner wiios : A gtvat Russian victory .liiui Ikvu acluicveu iu Galicia.

ENEMY’S IMPORTANT LOSSES

PETROGRAD, November 7. Official: During the lighting between October 23 and November 4 on the ThornCracow lino tho Russians captured 274 officers and 18,500 men, 3 howitzers, 40 cannon, 38 mitrailleuses, many shells, and arms and ammunition.

THE EASTERN FRONTIER.

PETROGRAD, November 8.

The Russians in East Prussia occupy a line from Schirviudt to Lyek—about 80 miles. thousands of German dead are unburied in many districts because tho ground ifi frozen, The Germans have everywhere abandoned their wounded, and tho resources of the Russian medical corps are heavily taxed dealing with them. The practice of not permitting an armistice for the removal of the wounded has been the cause of many deaths through exposure in the night lime. The Germans in Poland are steadily withdrawing to strongly-fortified positions on the Czenstochowo-Knlisch line. Here, with Breslau in the rear, the Germans have accumulated stores, and propose to remain on the defensive.

All towns which the Germans have traversed are wrecked and railway bridges blown up. Tho Germans when quitting Radom shot all prisoners, including a Cossack officer, who was compelled to dig hie ow-n grave- The Pauline Monastery was held as a hostage for the inhabitants’ 2 ood behaviour A tineat to bum the buildings which aro famous for pilgrimages strikes at the religious sentiments of the whole- of Poland. The monks who were expelled have arrived at the Russian Hues. They report that the monastery ias been prepared for the residence of the Kaiser. Furniture has been brought from Geimany, and rooms prepared for a staff of 60.

PRINCIPAL AUSTRIAN FORCT-

RETREATING

PETROGRAD. November 7

Official : Between October 28 and November 2 we overcame tho enemy's resistance in the region of Novalexandvia and Sandomir The principal Austrian forces and the Galician forces were in ietreat on the sth. During 18 days our successes along a -50'? verst (verst equal to twothirds of an English mile) front broke down the enemy's resistance, and they me now generally etreating. >

RUSSIANS CAPTURE A SIRONG HOLD.

PETROGRAD, November 8

After a desperate battle the Russians captured the stronghold of Kopricoi. commanding the road to Er/.eroum.

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Bibliographic details

PRINCIPAL AUSTRIAN ARMY RETREATING., Evening Star, Issue 15645, 9 November 1914

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3,775

PRINCIPAL AUSTRIAN ARMY RETREATING. Evening Star, Issue 15645, 9 November 1914

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