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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TERRIFIC FIGHTING AT YPRES.

WHELMING WAVES OF GERMANS.

MARVELLOUS BRITISH ENDURANCE.

GLORIOUS AND DECISIVE VICTORY.

BRILLIANT CHARGE BY BELGIANS.

GERMANS STIJL.L HOLD LILLE-

JOFFRE SAYS "OUR POSITION GOOD."

GERMANS RETREAT IN EAST PRUSSIA.

JAPS ASSAULT TSING-TAO.

CRUISER ACTION CONFIRMED.

Press Association —3y Telegraph—Copyright.

YPRES-LILLE ENCOUNTERS.

: BELGIAN ('HAIKU-; AT PERVYSr.

THREE DAYS' TERRIFIC FICHTINC. BRITISH OVERWHELMED, BUT RECOVER, AND BAYONET THROUCH, SECURINC A CLORIOUS VICTORY

PARIS. November 5 Received November 6. ai 9.15 a.m.)

FOR FRENCH'S "CONTEMPTIBLE

ARMY."

LONDON, November 5, (Received November 6, at 8.55 a.m.)

U i> computed that 700,000 Cermans were engaged in the endeavor lo break th«.' Ypre.-i-i.ille line. The battle raged fiercely for three days, each day presenting a dilfereut phase. The. tirst was tho enemy's general ad vance, during which they lost appallingly and succumbed in helpless droves before the British fire. Those who survived were ambushed and fell into concealed pits. Tho British loss was slight. The second phase next day was the storming of tho British trenches by overwhelming waves of Germans, and iiyht-ins in which the British retreated fi.v<i miles. The losses on both sides wero enormous in the hand-to-hand encounters.

The. third phase was last Saturday. It ooened with tho recovery of the British, w'ho displayed marvellous endurance-, and m a counter-attack bayoneted their way through all the Germans, and pursued them for 15 miles, until a glorious victory was achieved.

FURTHER DETAILS

STRAIGHT FIGHT: BRITISH v GERMANS.

BANNOCKBURN PITS USED

MOST GALLANT INCIDENT OF THE

LONDON, November 5,

(Received November 6, at 9.30 a.m.)

The British charge resulted in such slaughter that tho Germans* bodies rose like hedges, and impeded tho second and third assaults.

Battalion after battalion of Germans was hurled forward, and by their shceamomentum thoy drove down our trenches, outside which we had constructed pits 20ft wide and 20ft deep, these being covered with branches and loose turf, like the pits at Bannockbum.

The Germans poured into theso pits like a torrent, calling out grievously. Tho sreno was an appalling borror. Many -were transfixed on tho bayonets of their comrades who had previously fallen; others were shot by their friends' rifles. Occasionally a shell fell into a pit, and hundreds in a mass were blown to pieces. Meanwhilo the British cavalry annihilated tho Germans who tried f-o step over the bodies in the pits, and cut down thoso who crossed.

The struggle continued at close quarters for nearly 21 hours and the carnage was one-sided.

Superior numbers compelled the British to retire on the second day. The fighting became a melee, in which the pres?ure. on the. British was romoved time .after time- by successful charges by individual regiments. At dawn on tho third day an advance br the British was ordered. Their charges wore irresistible. 1 lie British swept, everything before them. In one of these the London Scottish received their baptism of fire, and they turned the scale in the most gallant event, of the war.

Never have the Prussians suffered such horrors, or such colossal lassos, or such irreparable damago as in this straight fight with the British.

FRENCH AND BELCIANS

CAPTURE RAMFCAPELLE WITH

BRILLIANT CHARUI

HERMAN* RUN IN DISORDER

PARES, November 5, * I Received November 6, at 3.55 a.m.)

A brilliant Franco-Belgian charge captured Ramscapelle. The Germans folding Iheir positfon untenable, began to retire. The Allies quitted their trenches, and charged across a mile of country, and, though swept by machine guns and shrapnel, they brushed the enemy's first line awav like chaS.

Tho Germans broke in disorder, leaving seven guns and SCO quick-firers. The Germans made a last desperate stand in Ramscapello, but the Allies' rush converted the retreat into a rout, and the Germans flung away their rifles. GERMANS STILL HOLD LILLE. ZtfEBRUGGE TO BE A GERMAN BASE. PARIS, November 5. (Received November 6, at 9.15 a.m.) It is definitely stated that the Germans still hold LUle. It is also confirmed that Che Germans are taking many submarines to Zeebrugge, where thev intend to establish a sea base.

A largo number of mines have been strewn about, and soma of the biggest £ims have been mounted.

THE POSITION IN FRANCE

PARIS. November 5 .niirlnipht)

iiteeeived November 6. at 9.15 a.m.)

CENERAL JOFFRE TO THE TSAR

TRIUMPHANT MAHCH OF I:I>'S]ANS.

"OUR OWN SITUATION GOOD

PARIS, November 5.

(Received November 6, at 9.50 a.m.)

RUSSIA'S ONWARD MARCH

I'RL'SSIA

SANDOMIERZ CAPTI.'RED

PETROGRAD, November 5. Received November 6. at 9.15 a.m.)

TSINC-TAO ASSAULTED

•STRONGEST FORT ALMOST IX ATOMS.

TOKTO, November 5 ißeceivd November 6, at 9.50 a.m.)

The way for the infantry was prepared by a terrific bombardment', -whi'-h almost reduced the fort, to atom?.

THE CRUISERS' FIGHT

AMERICA CONFIRMS THE XEAVS

MONMOITTH SUNK

GOOD HOPE'S FATE UNCERTAIN,

NEW YORK, November 5. (Received Novomher 6, at. 10 a.m.)

S.S. REMUERA SIGHTS KOMI

LONDON, November 5.

(Received November 6, at. 11.15 a.m.)

The Remuera reported that on her way to Cape Horn two German cruisers threatened her. After leaving Montevideo she sighted warship?. She extinguished all her li<rhte. went at full speed, changed her course, and eluded tho enemv.

KONIGSBERO REPORTED TUT OUT

OF ACTION.

LONDON, November 5.

(Received November 6, at 11.15 a.m.)

It is reported in London that the Konigsberg was put out of action in the- Indian Ocean.

ONCE NEAR NEW ZEALAND

SYDNEY, November 6. |Received November 6, at 10 a.m.) The 'Telegraph' bays that apparently

P>y a. furious Keludan iiayonet charge at Pervvse on Tttesdav 500 Herman.- wer<> killed.

Official: There i.s no noticeable change. We have t-lightly p'.ogre,--"d towards Me^sincs. Moh'iii, icstiHlers eannonade.s have taken plat.', particularly to the westward of Lens, between the, Soinme. Aiute. and Atomic, and facing Apiera.ont. [Mt's.-iiie.s is six inih> t-'fnih of Ypres. The J.ena mentioned will lie the town nine niilen X.J-h of Anas. Ainte is the old name of Albert, lfcl miles N.K. of Amiens.]

O-eneral .fotl're telegraphed to the Tsar aitititatulaiiu-'; hiiu "ti the ti'tiuuniiaut march of the /?ti.-siaii army during the last foi-uiitriit, and the fresh adva-nea e!o-e to the. (Merman frontier. 'The adds: "We on our side, by energetic .and insistent action, are seekina; to destroy the enemy. Our own situation us good.""

GF.RMANS KKfiUN RI-THKAT IX FAST

Official: A complete change is noti< eabfe on the Last Pni.-Giiiii irontier. The enemy have begun •to rnreat -'it certain points, markedly so on the left wing. Many have been taken prisoner. The Germans continue their hasty retreat on the Vistula frontier. Their rearguard has been <lriven nut of Yolo Przehorz. Our troops occupied Kielcc on tho 2nd. rapturing 600 Ausn-iams, who were hurriedly retreating on the -whole, line. We have occupied Sa-ndomierz, tapttiring 200 oflicers. 16.000 men, several dozen gun.-, and machine guns. (Sandomierz is at the confluence of the San and Vistula, 51 miles S.W. of Lublin, and was formerly tho residon ■■<• of the Kings of Poland.]

A victorious assault has begun on Fort Illis. the strongest fortification at, Tsingtao.

The ' New York Uer.ildV Valparaiso correspondent i-tatcs th.it Admiral (.YarldoekV men fought gallantly against mpeiinr odds. The. Monmouth was subicc tM to a. terrific fir<\ and her g;ins were .wmd until tho vessel toppled and sank. The Glasgow was damnicd, am! inn f.-.r Coroitel under the Good TlopoV protection. Tho Germans concentrated their firo on the Good Hope, and reaped pursuing tli: Gins go w The Good Hope's fa to is uncertain. [Coronal it. 25 mi!«> s-nrth. of Conceiwion.] .NAVAL DEFEAT DISCREDITED IN CANADA. OTTAWA, November 5. (Received November 6, at. 11.10 a.m.) The reported British defeat, in South American waters, is scouted in Government circles, although e\-r\i here credited in the United State* Press. THE ENEMY'S CRUISERS.

A score nf aliens' camps have been established in Great Tin.taiu and Ireland. At Gihraiiar r/li) persons werfi arrested. In London thousand-- of cases have been invest ij;at--d.

TURKEY LOSES CYPRUS

LONDON. November 5. (Receiver! November 6 af 9.55 a.m.)

The Turkish Ambassadors m London an<l Paris have received their passpoits.

Ofiirial : Kntain his auine.vd lh« island of Cyprus, which so far ha.- been administered In- the "British under a convention ■with Tttrkev.

P.OMi:,- Novemhcr 5.

Advioes fjotu Consianrinople stote teniiofficiallv that Turkey at present resiricts herself to war against Russia.

AMERICAN-GERMAN ARMA

TO INVADE CANADA

OTTAWA. November 5.

I Received November 6. at 11-50 a.m.)

The .Secret Service have discovered that there is great activity in the United States ainorjgst the German organisations with the object of invading Canada. Tho farmers in tho maritime provinces state that automobiles arc used nightly to cross the frontier, and that German townships on the United States side are receiving an influx of strangers of military appearance. The Canadian Government ainnounce thatfull preparations have been made to defeat auv attempt at an invasion of Canada. Ail railway stations and ports of entry are. guarded by the military.

THE LOCAL NAVY PKOPOSAI

WHAT LOItD BRYCK THINKS

LONDON, November 5.

(Received November 6, at 9.55 a.m.)

Presiding at a lecture on Imperial Defence at the University of Lord Bryce said that the argument in favor of colonial navies was that they excited greater local patriotism and interest. On the other hand, doubtless, it was more convenient that the Admiralty should have at its unqualified disposal every ship flying the ensign when the urgent necessity arose. Everyone felt that central control was absolutely nece6sary. in military and naval operations, both r\ tbe interests of the colonies and the Mother Land.

WHAT THE SYDNEY PRESS SAY'.

SYDNEY. November 6.

(Received November 6, at 11.15 a.m.)

The ' Daily Telegraph.' commenting on Mr Massey's thanks for the protection of the Australian Navy, says that 'it- may

tho British ships ane at least in touch with the elusivo German fleet in t)he Pacific, and it will be a epecial relief to public feeling if these formidable cruisers, which at ono time were within three days of New Zealand, are finally' accounted for. Even the silencing of the Emden would be more welcome- news than tho capture of all the islands taken from Germany. J THE ELUSIVE TURK. THE DOOR NOT YET CLOSED. (London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun' Servioes.) LONDON, November 5. The Turkish authorities in London assert that the door has not yet closed upon peace. BUT ONE AMBASSADOR LEAVES, AND FORGETS TO PAY HIS DEBTS. A LIVELY ARGUMENT. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun* Servioes.) PETROGRAD, November 5. The Turkish Ambassador departed without paying the four months' wages that were due. He told the employees lha-t they might receive them when the Turks came to Odessa. A servant retorted : "We will take them when the Russians reach Constantinople." Tho diplomat then became angry, and disparaged the Russian troop?, whereupon the .'ervaJit, struck him. Tho diplomat ' summoned the police, who hesitated to enter the Embassy. TURKISH TRICKS USELESS. I RELIGIOUS FACTIONS IN EVIDENCE. ; /London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Suu ' Services.} LONDON, November 5. The Russian Ambassador, who has left j Constantinople, says that tho Sultan might disclaim responsibility for the action of the Turkish fleet, but it is impossible to find a ji.ieific solution for the bombardment of Odessa. I A religious war has broken out at Scutari. ' The streets arc filled with Catholics and Mussulmans, who are. encamped on opposite sides of the town. There, has been fighting, and several persons were killed. TURKISH SHU'S SHY. PETROGRAD, November 5. (Received November 6. at 9.15 a.m.) Official: The Turkish fleet are con cftitrating in the strait,apparently avoiding a fight with our fleer. ENGLAND WAKING UP. CLOSING OF THE NORTH SKA. LONDON. November 5. - LI),. 'Times' says editorially that it is glad to see digits'in many quarters that the people are beginning to awaken to the gravity •>f the strugsle and the consequences depending on it. The Admiralty's Mn.ug measure to prevent the indiscriminate scattering of mines ulom: trade routes is unusual and unique, but pre.-ent eircuniM.nnros and tin; many recent disasters fully justify the decision. THE LOST HERMES. (London 'Times' ami Sydney ' Si.n' Services.) LONDON, November 5. The Admirahv announces that three niiu wore killed and 2M are missing through the lu* of the Hermes. LORD C. nERKSFORITs PLAIN SPEECH. (Loudon -Tillies' and Sydney 'Sun' Scrviecr-j LONDON, November 5. Speaking ai Croydon, Lord C. Beresford said we wore fighting like sportsmen and uentleme-.i against cowards, ruffians, and brigands. He believed that Great Britain would need aimtlier million men. .JAPANESE FOR EUROPE. (London -Times;' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.) LONDON. November 5. .Dr Diilon. ill the course "f an article, in the "Contemporary lv \ lev.,' urges that Japan be in\;teii m semi troops to Europe. A similar suggestion is m.vie in an anonvmous article in the 1- oi'tnightly Review.' GIFT OF AM MELANGE COLUMN. '.Louden "Times' and Sydney 'Sim' Services.) LONDON. November 5. A duchess, a commoner, and friends of the War Office have provided a motor ambulance column of 50 vehicles for service with the overseas exneditionaries. Kl'D' 11 EN F. R INSPECTS CA N A DIA N s THE KING'S MESSAGE. LONDON, November 5. (Received November 6. at 0.30 a.m.) Lord Kitchener iiir.peci«d the Canadians at Siilisbuiy Plain amidst intense enthusiasm. The King sent, a message that the Canadians' prompt reply was oi inestimable value and evidence of the solidarity o! ilie Empire. WATCHTNG TEIE ALIENS. (Lond.m ' Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Serriera.) LONDON. November 5.

now occur to tho people of New Zealand that the war has exemplified tho value to them of regular navy co-oporation with Australia. New Zealand cannot hope effectively to protect itself at sea for many years, whereas by combining with Australia it can ensure almost at once the handy presence of a strong navy. Tho ' Herald' expresses appreciation of Mr Massey's thanks, and refers to the envied position of the battleship New Zealand defending the heart of the Empire. If the Australian Navy had remained as in the subsidy era, there would have been no expedition to New Guinea or Samoa. They did not receivo any assurance of safety from the visits of cruisers. The war, whatever questions it leaves unanswered, has denned tho future relations of Australia and New Zealand, and it has settled tiny doubt in the minds of Australians that it is the right naval policy for them. People who shared tho same enterprises and tho same dangers needed nothing more to bind them together, unless it were such a frank recognition of servioes freely rendered as was contained in Mr Massey's speech. A nation which has known of the presence within striking distance of her coast of enemy ships powerful enough to bombard her towns and destroy her commerco needs no other proof of the value of a local navy. The value of a battleship of the Australia class in those waters is in effect 10 times '"•yter than had she been in the North Sea. TE CSTWORTHY CANADA. WILL SUPPLY A RECORD WHEAT CHOP. SECOND CONTINGENT OF 15,000. OTTAWA, November 5. (.Received November 6, at 11.40 a.m.) Western Canada farmers, assisted by the Government, are, to seed huge areas in wheat, intending to place under crop for 1015 tho largest area in Canada's history, with the object of supplying Britain's neerK A determined attempt to secure Germany's trade is being made throughout the Dominion. All Austrian and German residents are int-vr:ied in concentration camps for the duration of the war. Canada's f,evond contingent of 15,000 men are in training', and expected to leave in Januarv.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141106.2.48

Bibliographic details

TERRIFIC FIGHTING AT YPRES., Issue 15643, 6 November 1914

Word Count
2,550

TERRIFIC FIGHTING AT YPRES. Issue 15643, 6 November 1914

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