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CRICKET NOTES

' ;—-, , [lsy Wallaby.] The weather sor Uve opening afternoon of the season was fine, though tho players in the field and the spectators around the ground found the wind chilly as the day wore on. The light was .patchy owing to the clouding over of the sun every now and again, and in three of tho four matches play stopped before 6.30. In tho fourth match stumps were drawn at tho half-hour, even though a. definite result had not been attained. It is satisfactory to know that the wickets provided for the senior games on the Carisbrook, Caledonian, and North Grounds were good, the one on the North Ground being, for a Grange wicket, particularly good. The Carishrook wicket was' prepared away from the usual central square, and ran cast and west instead of north and south. But it played true, albeit a bit slow. On the. Cale. the batsmen were thoroughly satisfied with the strip of turf prepared for them. At Culling Park the conditions wore not so pleasant, tho wicket being rough and tmmpv, especially at the Tnhuna end. At the request 'of the St. Kilda. Club the Grade Committee have not arranged a senior match for tiie Park for the nest three Saturdays. After that it is expected the usual wicket area will have been sufficiently prepared. The turf wicket will not be available at Opoho | this season, consequently the hill club will play all their senior matches away from home. There were, about a couple of hundred spectators at Carisbrook. all curious to see how J. X. Crawford and his Colts would perform in their opening match, and it is safe to assert that all went away feeling that they had seen three hours' bright criVket.

The Colts' total of 189 was a very good one indeed for their initial effort, especially when it. is borne in mind that their skipper and mentor. J.N.C., was responsible for only 11 of the number. Every one of the batsrnen showed confidence, the Tesult, no doubt, of the practice and coaching of the past few months. But this practice, it must be remembered, had been on a fast concrete wicket, in comparison to which the turf on Saturday was slow to a. degree.

In making 64, L. Chndwiek. the Dunedin left-hander, was top scorer. He may be accounted lucky, however, as he gavo a couple, of chanoes and had several narrow escapes. Nevertheless he showed greatly-improved form, and should be responsible, for a lot of runs before the season is over. His batting on Saturday was refreshingly vigorous compared with his cramped style "of last season. Indeed, it, may be" said at onee that Crawford's Colts" without exception, used the bat as an instrument with which to hit the ball, not to merely stop it. May their example lie extensively followed. In getting 25. Shepherd showed, the best form on the side, lie made one beautiful square-cut off Rutherford, and his hooks and drives were equally clean and effective. His career was stopped by a good catch by wicket-keeper Martin, standing hack a little. Shepherd, too. was undoubtedly the best bowler >ui the side, after Crawford. He kept an excellent length and sent, down some really good balls, clean howling Hay, top scorer for the Carisbrook. with a beauty. To add to his all-round qualifications, the young Albion player is a keen field. Birinoy may be "named as another muchimproved batsman. He showed a variety of strokes in getting 22.

Galland was looked to for some breezy cricket, and he did not disappoint. During a stay of JO minutes he made. 17. chiefly from drives. This colt has always had a tendency t<> make rather too free with tho bowling, and. while commending freedom of stylo and I'orcel'ulness, 1 think a litthr more rcstiaiut on Galland's part would increase ids .scoring powers.

Stephens, one of the worst judges of a run that I have known, mado some nice, crisp strokes in getting 16, and then suffered the penalty of his bad judgment. Previous to this one of his partners (Hayden) had been run out also. Stephens running halfway down the wicket and then bolting back, and leaving the Opoho player to his fate.

Alloo batted nicely for his 13, being well held by the bowler (Hay) from a high return off a very short one.

Crawford himself, during his short stay at the wickets, did not look like getting a score, though most of the onlookers would have liked to have seen him get going. One off-drive off a no-ball from Hay was sweet, but he. failed to get right on to several others, and eventually fell to a catch in the long field by Bruges. The other batsmen did not go far, Bell being run out off a stroke by Binney bofore he had received a ball.

Tho fielding of the Carisbrook was patchy. Alloo and Nicholson being aixxit the best, and [ianuerman and Reid about the worst. It was Kcid's day off, for after missing four catches be was bowled first ball by Crawford. This was hard luck after cycling all the way from Milton to take part in the match. Of the Carisbrook players, the most conspicuous in both departments was tho Rev. W. Hay. ;> new man from Auckland, and a decided acquisition. Hay was such a fine performer for his club last year that. 1 understand, he would have Iteen chosen !o play for Auckland against th<! Australians bin for an injury to his knee. A left-handed batsman and bowler, he looks like becoming a useful Dark Blue. His batting at the beginning of his innings showed him to be short of practice, but a scoie of cO goes a long way towards getting a man in iorin. Crawford's fastrising ones troubled hi in a. bit, but he took full advantage of tho weakness at the other crease. In bowling Hay has a nice. oa«y deliverv. and when he struck his length he bothered the batsmen with a ball that went away a trille. Altogether he made a most satisfactory beginning iu Dunedin cricket.

Smith, who. I am pleased to sen. lias quite recovered from his accident at Maiarae. showed stubborn defence, ami scored a useful 19. but tlif least said about the rest of the Cavis-brook batsmen the. bettor. "With Hay out. Crawford went on a second time, changing to tbo grand stand end, and the result was a. speedy termination to the innings, ft was at once seen ihat ''J.N.'' meant business: the long, springy run, the wave, of the arms, and the. ball coming as from a catapult upset the opposing batsman—and their stumps—almost as quickly as, it takes to write, it. Twice the hiit trick was in view, and one* it was misled by a. roat of varnish. Five wickets out of the last six. and all clean bowled, was the result of Crawford's second t<ial with the ball. I fear me there will be much slaughter amongst the rabbits during the next few months, especially when tho wickets becoino faster.

With si'ch an example a<? their skipper pets, it is only to bo expected that tin? colts will prow a line fielding side, '/"hero was pknty of da.<h and keenness displayed on Saturday, and they are undoubtedly a team of trie is.

M'Mulleu'« svi vices a<- wicket-keepjv ■were secured, and the ox-Grange colt will no doubt shako down into a- useful member of the team. He lias not been piaying regularly for ;i season, or two, and this, added to the. faet that Craw-ford's bowling is not by any means easy to take, accounts for the 15 byes given away.

It is satisfactory to fee the Carisbrook B batsmen. Ramsden and Tuckwell, jumping into form right away. Tiiannden'a innings of 56 rpa.in*t Grange* w;iß a free and attractive display, during which he lifted the ball twice out of the Xorth Ground. Not that, lifting the ball out of the ground necessarily indicates good batting—often the contrary. But oa this occasion Ramedeii's cricket -wan good. Tuck-well, though he did not get very far, gob far enough to show come of his stylish, form. Watson's 45 was a, meritorious effort too; more subdued than Ramsden's. but none the lese effective.

Facing a total of 172, Orange did not fare too well at the Etart of their innings, but J. Graham and W. Beeby turned what looked like a defeat into a drawn game. Beeby, by the way, had to be eent for to C)poho, where lie -was playing with, thv) second eleven, to fill tbo place of Alec Downes. who did not put in an npEearacoo,

Eckhold and Graham for Grange, and Hardie And Nelson for Carisbrook eeenred good bowling averages. Hardie is a recent arrival from Melbourne.

Casej' eight for 18, Eekhdif eight for 25, Livingstone\eight for 43! Th«<se were the figures chimed by the chief howlers at I Culling PaTk. Having t>aid this, there, re.- : mains little to add, except that St. Kilda ' prevented Opoho tecuring a three-point win. ft. was scarcely a fair test for the new seniors, the wicket, as I have mentioned, being positively "deadly." Indeed, the batsmen were largely occupied while at the crease in. dodging "head halls." DunedinV win over Albion was a comfortable one. but tho old north end club is lamentably weak. Grigg, Tweedy, and E. Graham showed bi'fct batting form' for tho winners. Howard, a new .man from Wanganui is thort of practice, but stayed long enough to chow that he is a firiighed bat. 1 shall l>e disappointed if some big ■••cores do not appear opposite Howard's nrane during iho season. Graham is one of last yearV: juniors, and be got bis runs in confident fetyle Torrance was not available on Saturday, and it is doubtful whether be will be playing at all this year. Oonseiiuen'ly. Mackersy had to bear the brunt of tho bowling, and, as usual, arose to the occasion. His seven wiel.-els cost 66 runs. What, a useful! player the Dunedin veteran is, to be sure! "Old Jim*" Baker one© more headed the scores for his side. "Promising juniors" may come nod go, but "Jim" goes on for ever. It is the big heart thai does it.

Sim:o discussion aiose on Saturday regarding the interpretation of the new rule providing for the continuance of play lo 7 o'clock, "provided there is a possibility of a definite result being attained." Clearly, a '-definite result" has been attained if the first innings of each (side has been completed, and play must close at 6.30 in all such eases. It, framing the. rule it was not intended that the extension of time should he used to attain the ultimate tesult—a three-point win. The idea was to prevent, so '.'ar as possible, drawn games. This, at any rate, in the interpretation of the rule bv the Grade Committee of the association, to whom the point was submitted. Cricketers will note with pleasure the honor conferred upon Mr J. J. Clarkby his election to .the presidency of the. Now Zealand Cricket Council, the highest executive office, in connection with the game in the- Dominion. That the honor is thoroughly deserved we in Otago know, for there in" no keener cricket enthusiast, no truer "sport." in all New Zealand than the popular president of the O.C.A. Xot that Mr Clark's reputation is confined to Otago, for it is safe to say that his name is known to cricketers in every centre where the. game, is played. Congratulations, therefore, will flow from ail ; points, but the heartiest naturally will he those of our local players and supporters of cricket.

The council, it will be noticed, has been almost, entirely reconstructed. Mr F. C. Raphael, who had for so many years held the position of secretary, Mr j. 11. Williams (the hon. treasurer), and tho. whole of tho Management Committee, with the. exception of Mr A. T. Donnelly, resigned and were replaced by others. I understand there wa,s consider able difficulty in filling the position of treasurer, and in making up the retpiisitc number of members on the committee. A little bitterness was apparent in some of the speeches, and altogether the- meeting was not as pleasant "lis it. might have been. Mr J. S. Barrett undertook the secretarial duties only until some satisfactory appointment can be m:ide. .It will be- noticed that Ouigo is not represented on the Commit lee. which is rather a pity. Neither of the delegates (Messrs Peak* and Wiusor) offered themselves for election.

The difference of opinion that hasarisi-n between the Otago and Auckland Associations, and. incidentally, Mr D. Reese, regarding the actual scheme, agreed upon bv the. meeting of delegates two years ago, ha.s not yet been settled. The matter was stibniitted to the New Zealand Cricket Council by the Auckland Association (a course of-'action which the Otago Association approved), and the. annual meeting has referred it to the. incoming committee. It is- difficult to see what the committee can do, anyhow. They may express the opinion that the Auckland Association are right, and suggest that Otago make the trip to Auckland. But the, Otago A.ssoei;i.tion have already stated that their finances will not permit of a lengthy tour being undertaken. .So fains the original arrangements by the conference are concerned, I am strongly ot the. opinion that Auckland upset the scheme by refusing to come, to Dunedin last summer. 1 think I am correct in saying that the members of the O.C.A. held the same view, and expressed disapproval of Auckland's action. True, there are .some, both hero and in Christchurch, who have since changed their minds, after hearing Mr Reese's opinion, despite the fact that a paragraph in the Canterbury Association's report, and the. attitude of the Wellington Association (who supported Otago's claims) point to being in the right. It would appear, too, "as though Mr Reese's arguments on their behalf has persuaded the Auckland Association of the righteousness of their cause, lor it is only recently that they have, accused Otago of breaking the agreement. haviiug hitherto given other reasons for their failure to visit us.

Tho evergreen Jack Doig started the Invercargill season with six for 22 (all clean bowled) and five for 30, against Tnp.inui. It is remarkable how the exOpoho veteran keeps up his form year after vcar. ,

J. H. Hoard, the Gloucestershire professional, is again taking up his duties as coach to the Hawke's Bay Cricket Association. He returned to New Zealand by the Bo tenia.

The following have been chosen as the colts team against Albion on the North Ground on Saturday:—Crawford. Bunnev. Bell, Shepherd, Malcolm, Hayden, M""Mullen. Kerr, Stephens. Chadwick, A. \V. Alloo. The changes this week, are : Malcolm and Kerr replace Galland and Satierthwaite. Kerr is a young bowler from the St. Kilda team.

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Bibliographic details

CRICKET NOTES, Issue 15641, 4 November 1914

Word Count
2,475

CRICKET NOTES Issue 15641, 4 November 1914

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