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FURIOUS FIGHTING IN BELGIUM.

ALLIES KEEP GAINING GROUND.

GERMANS APPARENTLY WEAKENING.

KEEPING BACK DOOR OPEN FOR RETREAT.

THEY THINK WAR WILL END FAVORABLY IN JANUARY.

RUSSIAN HOSTS ADVANCING.

BULGARIA WILL KEEP TURKS OUT.

GOEBEN ENGAGED WITH FORTS.

CRIPPLED, AND RETIRES TO REPAIR.

OUR WAR LOAN, TWO HUNDRED MILLIONS.

Preis Association —3y Telegraph—Coprrigbt.

TWO HUNDRED MILLION WAR LOAN. LOXTMtX', November 3. (Rcccivcd November 4. .. 1 9 HO a.in.l it is rtmioied i.i banking circles that the Government will thorily issue a two hundred million 4 per rent. 10-year war loan at par. Probably half will be issued immediately. IN BELGIUM. am,n;s xnu, prsrnxo ci-k.mans HACK. BOARS CLi;ABM) FOR RETREAT. AMSTERDAM. November 3. (Received November 4. at. 10.5 a.m.) ’Flu- .dies haeo made further progress eastward of tiie. Niouport-Dixmnde-Ypres line. The lighting was furious, especially southward of a Line drawn between Dix-mud-e and Thourout. It is reported that 30.0 CC of- the Lanclsturm loeenUy arrived at Antwerp. Tho Go rninns are bettnn; tin* roads to Ghent a.-, dear as |*»?«U>le. t i ensure the rapid passage of troops in the event of a retreat eastwards. Traffic is forbidden hetwecn-Brusseis and Xamur. The influx of wounded to Brussels is described as terrible. During 48 hours last week 50 trains, each of 40 coaches, filled with wounded, passed from Ghent towards Germany. EXE MV DRIVEN BACK BEYOND DTXMUDE RAILWAY. WELLINGTON. November 3. Tho High Commissioner sends this report, dated London. November 2: Official : Belgian reports to-day indicate that the enemy have Loen driven back beyond the Nicuport-Dixmude railway. The flooding of the Vser made the enemy's trenches untenable. French troops continue to) advance from the south toward Dixmude. Tho British, though strongly attacked by Gorman reinforcements, retool; the ground previously yielded to the enemy at Chelan ix. The Russians are continuing to drive in Poland, occupying two important towns. Paris reports slight progress north and east of Vpres. Tile struggle is fierce in the Argonno district, the violent cannonading of the Germans making no progress. Seven thousand German prisoners have been taken in six days. GERMANS SACRIFICING THOUSANDS ON THE OFF-CHANCE. OFFENSIVE HAS SPENT ITS FORCE. LONDON. November 3. (Received November 4, at 8.50 a.m.) The, German generals continue to sacrifice thousands of men, apparently on the otf-chanee of victory. Great attempts are being made to break tho Allies’ lines in every position. Signs are not scanting that the tremendous offensive has spent its force. KAISER BADLY WANTED YPRES. SO DID Till: ALLIES. HAVRE, November 3. (Received November 4, at 10.5 a..m.) i A Belgian official report states that a German order, dated the 23th October, shows that the capture of Vpres was regarded as of capital importance. The Kaiser's impending visit to South Flandem was announced, indicating that the enemy’s principal effort was to bo directed between Vpres and Lys. But on Sunday and Monday the Allies shattered all the enemy's attacks in that legion. ENEMY'S ATTACKS LESS VIOLENT. ALLIES PROGRESS SOUTH OF DIX--1 MUDK. ) V.MWS, November 2. GnbbhgbW (Received November 4, at 8.50 a.m.) I Official; The German attacks between ,\bs> AnwcWv awd tho CKso are less violent. I We have progressed southward tcnv.vr- 1 : Vixmndo and southward of Ghelavelt, and hold all other positions. i The violent German offensive movement \ between AWawmi, 'WMiWj, vcwA. N'xbV's ' {ailed completely. v MvVXvNvX'XK NNMN \WW<NNXXA. 1 i LONDON, November o. (Received .November 4, at 8.50 a.m.) An Englishman who has arrived from Germany "reports lb at nothing is known there concerning the smashing defeat of the Germans, nor of the plan for a march on Calais, and nothing is let out relating to the enormous losses in the battles on the coast. Everyone is convinced that this portion of the plan for the conquest of England is being carried out. VACATING TRENCHES AT NIGHT. (London ‘ Times' and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services, i LONDON, November 3. In order to minimise the losses in night bayonet charges, the Germans have adopted the practice ot vacating the front trenches during the night ami leoocapyiug them at dawn.

ENEMY ABUSE THE WHITE FLAG. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.) LONDON, November 3. A correspondent states that the Germans aro still making'treacherous «-e of tho white Hag. The hoisting of thin signal is the almost invariable reply to a British bayonet charge, and when the British have taken the- signal in good faith they have been cooily tired upon. As a result the white ftnz in German hand.* has 10.-t all its significance. GERMAN' ADMITS AMAZING LOSSES ON THE YSER. (London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun ' Services.) LONDON, November 3. A German lieutenant who is a. prisoner geneiously praises the Belgians. He admits that there were amazing German lortses after crossing the Yser. The Ger■mans floundered in the flooded intervening country, the Belgians pouring in a deadly infantry fire. It was one of the most horrible sights he ever saw. Men were shot and diowned at the 6ame time. LOOTING IN BELGIUM AND FRANCE. (London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun ' Sendees.) LONDON.. November 3. Some of tho prisoners taken are loaded with watches, jewellery, and French money, acquired in looting in Belgium and Fraiue. STREAM OF GERMAN WOUNDED. (London 'Times' and Sydney 'Sun' Services.) LONDON. November 3. A Dutchman says that 1,200 German wounded have been passing through Cologne and Frankfort every two days. DECEIVED BAVARIANS. (London ' Times ' and Sydney ' Sun' Services.) LONDON, November 3. In view of the fact that the Queen of the Belgians is a Bavarian Princess, tho officers of the Bavarian troops, on arriving in Belgium, informed their men that they were in the Ardennes. When the Bavarians learned the deception they attacked the hotel and killed every officer in it.

WAR WILL TERMINATE IX JANUARY. HO THE GERMANS THINK. Tin-: kaiser's nous PROPHECY. LONDON, November 3. (Received November 4, at 10.45 a.m.) Advices from Berlin state that the general feeling in Germany us that tho uar will terminate at the end" of January. The Kaiser, presiding at a troop parade 50 miles from the German fighting line in France, congratulated the firnjide.nburg regiment.% and added: "After the. war we will all meet aaain. In any case, the enemy will be- beaten."' THK FAiTIERLAND IN T MOURNING. LONDON. November 3. (Received November 4. at 10.15 a.m.) Sixteen thousand widows at Dusseldorf aro mounting for their detd. Tn Cologne, Hamburg, and oth?r cities mourning is described as almost universal. BIG GUNS MOUNTED. LOS'DOX, November 3. (Received November 4, at 10.45 \.m.) The Germans have installed several 52oeriUmetre guns on Rorkum Island. [This island as at the mouth of the Erne.] HUNGRY GERMANS SURRENDER. PARIS, November 3. (Received November 4, at 10.5 a.m.) I'iity German Polos surrendered at i Badonrillcr after killing their Prunsutn} officers. They gave information which cni ',\\S\e<\ tW YreTieb \.o civpUvre ibe Yorost ol\ I'arroy. ) Vonr hundred hungry Germans offered) to euxrendee near ifto I'ser canaf. When ( \ t"hey "ielt their trenches t\ieir fined on thorn, and on/v 230 reached the I French Unas. ' I ILRXIPrS KEPT TBl-,m SECRET. \ (.London 'T/we3 ' and Sydney 'Sun ' Sem'ces.) ( *. { I A TJerliji message says that the V-ermms ] ) hnvo Tctained remarkable peerftey about the 42-ceiitiinetre giwf, which the. encmv i regard as fables, but they have been actti- ! any m Germany'?, possession for six■yeaif. > the artillerymen constantly practising with ) them. " j MINES IN THE NORTH SEA. \ LOXDOX, XovemlKr 3. j (Received November 4, at 10.5 a.m.) I A gale has drivein a number of powerful German mines ashore at Northumberland, j BASE HOSPITALS OVEIRCROWDETJ. LONDON, November 3. (Received November- 4. at 9.20 a.m.) I

The congeition at the base hosj iials has caused many to succumb for lack of atWntion.

LORD WELLESLEY KILLED. LONDON, November 3. (Received November 4, at 9.20 a.ro.) Lord Richard Wellesley was killed on Thursday. [He was a captain in the Grenadier Guards; born in 1879; son of the Duke of Wellington; and served in South Africa ■] RUSSIANS PRESSING HARO. PETROGRAD, November 3. Official: Further progress has been mad© in driving the enemy from the eastern border of the Rominten Forest in the Vladistavoff district. The Russian offensive beyond, the Vistula continues uninterruptedly, except in the Opatow district, where a. largo force of Austrians drove tho Russians hack. SPLENDID RUSSIAN HOSPITAL. (London ‘ Times ’ and Sydney ‘ Sun ’ Services.) LONDON, November 5. The Russian army hospital organisation at Bovno is superb. In its limitless wards one is impressed with what human beings can stand and recover from. One man who was shot through the head was practically well in a fortnight. Others who were shot, through the abdomen, the stomach, and the bladder aro recovering as smoothly as though it was part of the day’s work. BATTLE CRUISER COEBEN IN' ACTION AT SEBASTOPOL, AND SUFFERS DAMAGE. PETROGRAD, November 5. (Received November 4, at 10.5 a.m.) Tho Gochcn opened fire at a mile range on Sebastopol, trying to wreck the railway funnel, and a train came under her fire near Inkerman. The ship threw 116 shells. A fog assisted her approach. The batteries shelled the Goebcn. A wireless station intercepted the Goehen’s message; “Am damaged: going to Constantinople for repairs.” BULGARIA PREPARING TO KEEP THE TURKS OUT. ROME, November 3. (Received November 4, at 9.20 a.in.) A telegram from Sofia states that the mobilisation of tho Bulgarian second line is ordered. The first line is already mobilised. Bulgaria has informed the Triple Entente'that her neutrality will not be abandoned unless Turkey attempts to march troops across Bulgaria. I) ULGA RTA .MUST SOON DEC ID K. (London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sim’ Services.) LONDON, November 3. The gravity of the situation consequent on Turkey's attack on Russia is fully realised at Sofia, where it is foreseen that Bulgaria must soon be confronted with a fateful decision. The majority unquestionably sympathise with Russia. DAMASCUS RESTLESS. ATHENS, November 3. Anti-British demonstrations took place at Damascus, the public favoring wav. The transport of troops across Syria has ceased, but a large number of Bedouins have concentrated. OTAGO PATRIOTIC ASSOCIATION. MEETING OF EXECUTIVE, A special meeting of the executive of tho Otago Patriotic and General Welfare Association was held in the Town Hall to-day. There was a large attendance of member*, and His Worship the (Mayor (Mr J. B. Shaddock) presided. The Mayor said the business of the meeting was to consider (1) the notice of motion given by Mr P. R. Sargood ; (2) to consider a. recommendation from the. Employment Committee to vote £3,000 to ©aids the, met. of walling the Leith; and (3) re St. Ciair-St. Hilda esplanade. Mr Snrgood then moved—“ That tinsum of £20.000 he specially cat marked for the purpose of providing relief to returned troopers, or the dependents of any of the troopers '"he, have gene to the front, anti that the amount l>c placed in the hands of the Fitijince Committee on trust for tho above purposes.” He said ho was prompted to move this resolution because of the position he held as chairman of the Expeditionary Force Committee of the Patriotic Association. The resolution had not been considered by that committee. Hie moving of the resolution, he considered, was a duty he owed to the men and their dependents. He had; no doubt but that the Government would jnake provision for the incapacitated and for the dependents of such, but history showed that no Government had ever made adequate provision. It was the duty of this association to set aside an adequate sum. It was just pos sible that many move, men would be required, in which case a much larger sura would be necessary. There were lour distinct responsibilities resting upon the association. First, there was the relief of returned contingontcrs ; second, the responsibility of looking after the dependents; thirdly, the relief of men who return incapacitated ; and fourthly, to assist tho poor of Britain and otti* Allies. Mr F. W. Mitchell, in seconding the motion, said he could not do better t-ham quote the remarks make by the Prince of Wales. His Royal Highness made it perfectly clear that his fund was for th' 1 relief of dependents and others affected by the war. Ho realised it was the duty of the. Government to assist those affected by the war, but he believed with tho mover that what would he done by the Government would he inadequate. The amount proposed to ho provided by the association would supplement whatever the Government would do.

Mr J. A. Johnstone paid : T. rise to r-np-port the intention of Mr Sargood's motion, which, of course, as at present worded, cannot ho effect to, because (he amount suggested i.i tnoro than we have at our command free for the purpose he has outlined. However, if this meeting agree, with me, I think wo ehould decide to endeavor to raise at lew-st £20.000 to create a. special fund to be i;sed for the ivlicf of the dependents of those, o'f our ' men that arc Jk'lititi" against the enemy, j :ind who may lose lives in the conflict, or who may become incapacitated in | it. I am sure, if the general public of j Otago were .-issuivd that their contribn- j lions were to bo earmarked for this specific I purposv, that iii pood deal more money ! would he sent in to briny the fund up to the. £20,000. Of course, I a*, lias been said, that i'nc* firfit thing for tie to j do is to ascertain what provision the Go- | vemmo.nt propose to make for the dependents of octv soldiers; but, having I harried that-, I think it iriJJ he necessary. for us to supplement whatever the Goi xernmenV c\o, \ot no \Aci\'e\\\Yc\c\\\j «s«\\svve. mndo adequate provision for the wives und families-, of tbo.se that in limes of 6tTcss*' have gor/o forth to fight the battles of i ) their covmYry. "?o\- YtatiY. t%m»\\.\\, ' upon each one of us to help to the utmost of our resources in bringing up the pro-: [tosed fund to the Amount J j Y)T\\-e 'ysyi\yci?«k\ sawcc tW &:s.i di\- V \\Vv> WVOT\\Y\S<i Ws\. \yj YVtfj tact t\\»t Its' )chief pu''p(## j&ems to hare been to Yifitrn tc requests by one section or another for I VMWVfVwv aid, and I venture to say that i ) many o\ lis, "insteao. o\ vn wis lyovov Ao itU'Yeasc the: total of our funds, funvf hern doing ijuit-c the reverse. 1 fun m'tc that most people who have contrf-1 buted to the funds, except where jheyi explicitly expressed their intentions other-' wise, meant their money to he earmarked I for the purposes set forth in Mr Sargcod'e motion. Thove caa bo no doubt that the] I money given to us for the relief of local ' diet-tern can and should be allocated to work such as that proposed" to be under- i taken on the banks of. the L-eith. Stream, ! but we want to be quite certain that in anv vote wo mav make we are really granting relief to' those that are out of wovk either directly or indirectly as the result of the war. So far; I have eeen no outward evide.-ice of distress in the community. That there aie some such cases I do not question, but speaking generally : one must say that the »pp*a»n«e aw all 1 in tha other dir.ect.ifin.. So hm tOkt am!

able to judge at this moment, our people have not been called upon to make any personal sacrifices on account of this terrible war; in. fact, one questions if the majority of our citizens, both in town and country, have begun to realise in their minds what the horrors and sufferings and distress of such a war as this means to the people of Belgium and to the dependents of the men of our own flesh and blood, both on land and sea, who are fighting for our continued national existence to-day. I* our people did realise the position, there would be no need for us to continue our appeals to the public for increased help. Anything that we might be called upon to do without would be as nothing when compared with tho 6ufferince of our kindred in the Home Land. Do our people realise that if the enemy wore to succeed all they possess would Ik- taken from them? t fear this idea has not suggested itself to them, and it is a real notsibilitv, otherwise more of our men would he offering their services to the Empire, and our settlers everywhere-would Ivo massing increased gift* of money and kino* upon this association. My object is to endeavor to make it clear to this commitleo that, our first duty, as far as our «enera! fund is concerned, is to conserve it for the. benefit of the dependents of our men who, as comrades of the Bntieii soldiers and our European Allies arc engaged in war with an enemy who. it ne succeeds, will bring ruin to us all. Because of th.3 views I have expressed, J. cannot, agree to any portion of the general fund heing voted to works in the City or elsewhere, and I do hope this committee will regard the general fund as I do, as in trust for tho benefit of the dependents of tho men who have gone from Otago witli the Expeditionary Forces. I do not propose to take notice of tho criticism made at vesterdav's meeting of the Unemployment and Relief Committee with regard to uiv statement on Monday relative to tho total amounts raised in Canterbury and Otafo respectively for the British-Belgian relief fund further than to say that the figures given then worn authentic, and vesterdav the position of the two funds wis as 'follows:— Ganterbuiy : Cash received. £24,661 2s 4d ; value of clothing, £7.017 lis 7d : total, £31.618 Ijs lid. Otago: Cash received. £6.784. Otago has also sent a quantity of clothing, but J. am now informed that, it would bo difficult to estimate the value, of it, Ido not know what money has been subscribed in Can-te-rburv for' the Expeditionary Force or for local relief purposes ; but we see from tho foregoing that the. Belgium relief fund alone is as much as the total amount that has passed through this association tor all funds, which at yesterday's date was £31,454 9s 6d. I know rfuite well that a few largo subscriptions which mkrht properly be credited to Otago went direct to the "Government on the outbreak of Ihc war. but after allowing for these ar.<l the fine response that was made, to this association's appeal on Trafalgar Day, ilic fact remains that largo numbers of our people have not yet given to the funds, or have given inadequately, taking into account the necessities of the case. The Rev. Tl. f>. Gray raid he was very strongly of opinion that if any money was eai'-iiiai-ked it should lie ascertained from the Government what, they proposed to do in the wav of providing pensions. It was no part of his duty to i-ay what any other party in power might do as regards making 'provision for the incapacitated and their dependents. He was speaking quite apart from politics altogether, and merely as a member of )he executive and as. a private citizen. He felt that the Government would he impressed with the amount the association were to lay aside, for the purpose contemplated. His own opinion was that tho Government would do a.s !'.'- tie as they possibly could, lie iVlt sunthat the one rlass of people who. were i'.'.-i----in£ the pressure most yen- the workers (Hear, bear.; Me moved a.- an amendment: -That this committee arc c.f opinion (1) that the provision which mu.-t be made for the members of the Kxpeditioi:f.iy Forces who v. iil he incapacitate'], an 1 for the dependents of iln*e. who will lay down their lives for the Empire. i> cue of the tirsi duties o. the G-. veri.nient : 2) that patriot.!, hinds rni.-ul f- >: tills purpose snould lie only for supplementing such provision : lo) tiiat in view oi the uncertainty and anxiety upon the: cjuestion. the Government should at once declare what thev propose to d<>; i' 4; that with a v>w to tirst ascertaining the intentions of the Government regarding members of the Expeditionary Forces who may be incapacitated, the' dependents of those who may lay down their lives for the Empire, the sums at credit lfnder the head of ' unconditional' he in the meantime left unallocated."

Mr (.'. Speight- said it »';u evident that er.iue of those, present were unacquainted with the clauses of the, Defence Act. which made provision for incapacitated men and their dependents, lie ventured to say that if tho association were to take in "hand the providing for those referred to £20,000 would he totally inadequate. Mr R. Tirecn said that in view of what Mr Speight had .-aid there seemed to be no necessity for either the motion or amendment. A matter of £15.00 >r £20,000 would be only a drop in the bucket when it came to doling out relief. .Mr P. R. Sargood. in reply, .".aid he understood that tile Government purpose.-] making provision tor the men, hut to what extent he was not prepared to .=ay. The efforts of the association would only, therefore, he supplementary. He did not flunk the. Imperial Government would he a«!;c<! to contributo to a penr-ion fund, ;;s w.-.s done in the Boer War. He only hoped tiie people of Otago would wake up, and hecome alivo to their responsibilities. There, was reaJly only one. section of the. community that had realised their rospon.-i----bjlities in the matter, ami that was the (voinon. (Applause.; Mr R. Breen then gave notice of a further amendment: ''That the amount to be allocated for the purpose, referred to be £10.000."

The amendment, on being put, was carried by a large majority. Mr Breen then moved lii> amendment, but it lapsed for want of a seconder. Mr Gray's amendment was then put as a substantive motion and carried. —Employment and Relief Committee'g Report.— The Rev. I<\ G. Gumming submitted the Employment and Relief Committers report, 'as follows:—To date 69 applications for relief have, been considered, and relief amounting to £lO7 19s has teen granted, and 7{ tons of tho coal has been distributed. Oce>an Drive: The Public: Works Minister has agreed to contribute £1,500 towards the construction of tho Ocean Drive at St. Clair-St. Kilda as a £ for £ subsidy on the contribution from this association. The plan has been approved of by the District Public Works Engineer, and has now been sent to "Wellington. The Otago Expansion Eeague are to meet the Domain Hoard tomorrow evening to make final aiTangoments for the eommcnrempni of th? work. It is recommended that consideration of i tYici -maUeY eA \\\\j> wciv'w "via Avv ' ferred till the nieetii>/r oi the executive on the 16th inst.

During the diecusKimi on the report it j ) was expaineA W.\Y 'Oho svysw «A £bJi>xß> "Wv.' jso far been voted hv the executive for I works and roliei. Of t this, about £1,600 had been oxfieucle<l. To simplify matters I ,tW Wev. "Vit wiovcV—" TJW\.' V\v% \ t meni ComMiUeff. to be £p/Vlt .it the rMe of £125 per weak, be held io he. a tempo- j vX*.vj avid Uvat it be ( j superseded hy tho definito volps now ioV»? j passed." This was canied.—ln. regard to (the work on the esplanade, Mr Speight \ thought, that if the Government were, in- j 1 formed that the unemployed had in the. I | meantime) been provided for by other work, they would be agreeable, io suspend I i the condition under which the grant had ; 1 hr.en made—that the work he begun at, once —and so enable the committee, to f mako the esplanade construction n work the •winter, when the need would be more pressing.—Messrs M'Curdy and Small again placed the plans of the proposed Leith wall before the committee, and it was stated that tlio Harbor Board had -vet ro (otnuvlly agree to tho undertaking as it ali'ected "their responsibility. It • was understood to be only a formal matter, however, and there was no reason why the work should not. he gone on v.iih ! at once. —The.seocfft. sJiTnlfil'.

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FURIOUS FIGHTING IN BELGIUM., Evening Star, Issue 15641, 4 November 1914

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FURIOUS FIGHTING IN BELGIUM. Evening Star, Issue 15641, 4 November 1914

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