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SAVAGE FIGHTING IN FLANDERS.

WEDGE INTO GERMAN POSITION.

KAISER ORDERS YPRES TO BE TAKEN,

OTHERWISE ARMY MUST WITH-

DRAW.

GERMANS ENTRENCHING AT BRUSSELS.

TURKEY’S TREACHEROUS DEALINGS EXPOSED.

Press Association —By Telegraph—Copyright-

ON THE FLANDERS* FRONT,

DEEP WEDGE INTO GERMAN

POSITIONS.

AMSTERDAM, November 2.

: While the Allies it: Flanders have been fighting with magnificent elan and splendid spirit, the Germans haw been struggling with the valor of desperation. Their spirit is almost at the latl ebb. Occasionally there has been a superb dash, and they advanced here and there, only to U s diiveu ■Kick repeatedly. They returned to the 'charge, but were held everywhere. On Friday, on tha Flanders front, the lighting was as savage as any of the pie.-eding 15 da vs.

The battle was the Bloodiest in the history of the war. The slaughter at the Marne and Aisne pales leforc it Untold aumbers of dead are littering the- fields. fur.es, and trenches. T>er.ch after trench has been taken, and a deep wedge driven into the German povtmns.

BRITISH. DGGGEDN ESS

AN ARMORED TRAIN

CALAIS, November 2

In a recent skirmish near Ypres tho better part of a British regiment encountered half a German division. The enemy's line advanced, almost encircling the British force, who doggedly held the railway line, inflicting immense damage on their foes. Sudderdv an armored train poured a broadside into tiro Germane until they were practically wiped out.

ENEMY REPULSED ON THE YPRES.

PARIS, November 1 (evening),

There is nothing now to report from the front from Nieuport to Dixrnudo. Tire Germans continued to male© violent attacks along tho whole region from north to east and south of Ypres, but all were repulsed. We progressed slighUy, but perceptibly to tho cast of Ypres. In an early battle the Germans captured tho villages of Hollbeko and Measines. These were recaptured the same evening by vigorous counter-attacks. On the /west front the struggle is very fierce and marked by violent cannonades, the enemy unsuccessfully attempting to capture the ground we captured daring tho last few days. In Argor.no tho Germans hay© made no progress during the week. .From the 14th to tho 20th ult. 7,685 German prisoners were interned. These do not include the wounded tended in our ambulance nor detachments on tho way from the front to the rear.

KAISER NOW SAYS HE MUST TAKE YPRES.

CALAIS, November 2.

Dunkirk reporta state that the Afrits intercepted the Kaiser’s wirdtss message to a general declarnig that it was n’osa»ute]y necessary to take Ypros before November 1 j otherwise the army must withdraw to the Ehlno.

COAST CLOSED TO GERMANS,

LONDON, November 1

Referring to the recent fighting, a Belgian declares that hast read to the coast has been finally closed aginst the Germans.

RECORD SHELL FIRE,

AMSTERDAM, November 1

More sheila have been tired between the sea and Dixmntle during the past week than during the whole of tho Boer War.

ENEMY DEFENDING BRUSSELS

AMSTERDAM, November 1

The. severest struggles arc the night encounters. German reinforcements are advancing, and strong defensive positions preparing between tho present line and Brussels. Entrenching around the capital is proceeding feverishly. -Meanwhile a. stein struggle is progressing in the vicinity of Passchendaele.

GERMANS’ ARTILLERY EVERY

THING

LONDON, Nivcmlwr 1

A correspondent, at tho front says that everywhere one hears the same story that tho German foot soldier cannot shoot, won’t stop to fight when attacked, runs away, fires over bis. shoulder running, or throws his arms up in token of surrender, but the superior German gun fire makes havoc on our trenches. Without it tho enemy would not have a. chance at all. 'THE FIGHTING IN FRANCE. PART?, November 2 (midnight). Official: There is nothing fresh "to report. Belgium repulsed vk lent attacks on the environs of Lihons and IJut-mov, in the Santorro Valley, on the At»iu>, ami at Lagruibi. in the forest of Argonne. Continued progress has been recorded northward of Souain. Our offensive in the Vosges has mado us master of tho heights adjoining the Marne. Several German prisoners refer to a re- • ent mutiny in a German regiment in Lorraine, stating that ISO men shot their officers and then crossed tho frontier and surrendered to tho Frenifh authorities.

Cases of suicide are frequent in the (Toma a lines.

ROME, November 1. _lJr Yon Hollweg lias reixirted to the atican that a French observation post has again been last ailed in the tower of the Rheims Cathedral, which will justify any further bombardment. GERMAN BELIEFS AND HOPES. LONDON, November 1. A correspondent of the newspaper |Vaderland,’ accompanying the Germans in Flanders, says German officers hold the east-iron belief that Germany is winning, and that the whole of Europe will bo subjugated, Belgium become a province of Prussia, and Poland a kingdom under the house of the Hapeburgs, while a great anion of German States will bo formed and Alsace-Lorraine become part of this union, or, joined with Bade< the union will comprise Finland, Sweden. Norway, Denmark, Holland, and England, these either being subdued or drawn into the union. I PRISONERS OF WAR. LONDON, November 1. In consequence of the campaign in the German newspapers against Britain regarding the treatment of prisoners, a Dutch editor visited several camps in England and reported that the conditions were satisfactory. The ‘Cologne Gazette’ reproduced tlie article. To English visitors many prisoners expressed gratitude for their treatment. It is understood that Germany has advised Great Britain that ah* inlands treat-

ing Englishmen in Germany between the ages ol 17 and 35 as war prisoners unless aolc-bodied Germans in England are liberated.

WELLINGTON, November 2. The High Commissioner reports under date London, November 1 (11 a.m.): — Official: In view of the action of German forces in Belgium and France, in removing as prisoners of war all persons liable to military service, the British Government have given instructions that all reservists aboard neutral vessels are to bo made prisoners of war.

RUSSIANS ADVANCING,

PETROGRAD, November 2 (morning). Official: The Russians on the East Prussian front have progressed to the Vladislauoff district. They have advanced victoriously to the other side of the Vistula along the whole front, and occupied Petrokotf, Opoczno, and Opaboff, and on the road to Opaboff routed the enemy’s rearguard, taking 400 prisoners, some quicktirers. and a convoy of provisions. A "Russian regiment near Loanachovo, on the San, reaheed the enemy’s positions, creating a panic. They stormed the Austrian fortified position, taking five officers and 500 men prisoners and some quickfirers.

TRAWLER FOULS- SUBMARINE

AMSTERDAM, November 2

The Dutch trawler Pardero reports that her nets fouled tho German submarine U9 off Holder, damaging the propeller. Tho Pardero cut the nets. It is believed that tho submarine is drifting. LONDON, November 2.

Tho Rotterdam trawler reports that it was suddenly drawn along by an invisible force and almost capsized. Presently submarine U9 came to the surface entangled in the net. The captain of the trawler hailed the vessel, but there was no response. The submarine fired a rocket, and disappeared after the nets had been cut.

THE ROHILLA,

LONDON. November 1

A motor lifeboat rescued the remaining survivors of the Rohilla, including the captain and chief engineer. The total saved is 146.

November 2. Seventy-four perished with the Rohilla.

MONEY FOR THE COMMONWEALTH.

MELBOURNE, November 2.

The Premiers’ Conference was informally opened to-day. The chief matter for dis cussion is finance. Mr Fisher will announce that the Imperial Government are prepared to assist the Commonwealth to secure what money is required up to £20,000,000, with a currency of five years.

AID FOR SUFFERERS

NEW YORK, November 2,

The Rockefeller Foundation is despatching 4,000 tons of foodstuffs to Rotterdam for the use of non-combatants.

The Foundation is prepared to spend 1,000,C00d0l in relief for non-combatants in all countries.

LONDON, November 1. The New Zealand war fund has reached £5,200. Cook and Son, soft-goods men, of St. Paul’s Churchyard, have lent New Zealand tho wing of the convalescent home in Kent, containing 13 beds and excellent accommodation.

SYDNEY, November 2. The New South Wales war funds total £361,000.

TURKEY AND GERMANY

STORY OF THE GREAT INTRIGUE TOLD BY THE FOREIGN OFFICE. WELLINGTON, November 2. The Government have received tho following official announcement from the Foreign Office, dated London, November 1, 3.45 p.m. : At the beginning of the war tho British Government gave definite assurances that if Turkey remained neutral her independence and integrity would be respected during tho war and in terms of peace. In this pact Russia concurred. The British Government have since then endeavored with the greatest patience and forbearance to preserve friendly relations in spite of increasing breaches of neutrality on tho part of the Turkish Government at Constantinople and in the case of the German vessels in the Straits. On October 29 tho British Government learnt with the utmost regret that Turkish ships of war had, without any declaration of war and without warning or provocation of any sort, made wanton attacks upon an open undefended town in tho Black Sea of a friendly country, thus committing an unprecedented violation of the most ordinary rules of international law and usage. Ever since the Gocben and Breslau took refuge in Constantinople the attitude of the Turkish Government towards the British caused surprise and uneasiness. Promises made by the Turkish Government- to send away the German officers and crews of the Goeben and Breslau were never fulfilled. It was well known that the Turkish Minister of War was decidedly pro-German, but it was confidently hoped that the saner counsels of his colleagues, who had experience of the friendship which Great Britain has always shown towards tho Turkish Government. would prevail and would prevent that Government fmm entering upon a very risky policy by taking part in the conflict on the side of Germany. Since the war began German officers in large numbers have invaded Constantinople, and have usurped tho authority of the Government, and have been able to coerce the Sultan’s Ministers into taking up a policy of aggression. Great Britain, France, and Russia have watched these proceedings patiently, protesting against many acts which have constantly been committed contrary to neutrality, and warning tho Sultan’s Government against the danger in which they were placing the Ottoman Empire. Vigorously assisted by the Ambassadors of Germany and Austria. German military elements in Constantinople have been persistently doing their utmost to force Turkey into war both by their activities in the service of the Turks and by lavish bribes. The Minister of War, with his German advisers, latterly prepared an armed force for an attack upon Egypt and Damascus. An army corps has, since mobilisation, been in Constantinople sending troops south preparatory to the invasion of Egypt and tho Suez Canal from, Akabah and Gaza. A large body of Bedouin Arabs has been called out and armed to assist in this venture. Some of these have crossed the Sinai frontier. Transport has been collected and roads prepared up to the frontier of' Egypt. Mines have been despatched to bo laid in the Gulf of Akabah. The notorious Sheik Aziz Shaurs has published and disseminated through Syria and probably through India an inflammatory document urging the Mohammedans to fight against Great Britain. Dr Prueffer is busily occupied in Syria trying_ to incite tho people to take part in this conflict. This aggressive action was certain to be tho result of the activity of numerous German officers employed in the Turkish army, acting under the orders of tho German Government. who have thus sucoeodod in forcing the hands of the advisers of the Sultan.

German intrigue cannot Influence the loyalty to Great Britain of 70,000,000 Mohammedans in India, nor the feeling of Mohammedan inhabitants in Egypt. 'They must look with detestation on * the misguided action, under foreign influence, at Constantinople, which will inevitably lead to the disintegration of the Turkish Empire, and which sjjows much forgetfulnecc of the many occasions on which Great Britain has shown friendship to Turkey. _ They must feel bitterly" the degeneration of their co-religionists, who can thus bo dominated against their will by German influences. On Friday the Turkish Government summarily cut off telegraphic communication with the British Embassy at Constantinople. This is no doubt the prelude' to furtn»r acts of aggression on tneir part. Thu British Government must take whatever action is required to protect British interests and British territory in Egypt from attacks made and threatened.

AMBASSADORS QUIT CONSTANTINOPLE. •

CONSTANTINOPLE, November 1

Official : The Ambassadors of the Entente requested and received their passports. The police have stopped all British subjects from leaving Turkey. It is feared that they will be retained as prisoners.

TURKEY LEARNS FROM GERMANY,

AND PROVES AN APT PUPIL.

LONDON, November 1

Berlin reports that -Sir Louie Mallet, British Ambassador to the Porte, has left Constantinople; also that the Turkish fleet set fire to 50 oil reservoirs at NovoRossi isk and five at Odessa, sank 14 transports, and destroyed several grain warehouses and a wireless station at NovoRossiisk.

PETROGRAD, November 2 (morning). Passports have been handed to the Turkish Embassy. It is now apparent that while the Ambassador was profuse in pacific assurances the wires between Constantinople and here were blocked to enable- the Turco-German fleet to inflict the utmost damage before Russia could realise that a blow had been struck.

The torpedo boats that approached Odessa were painted to resemble Russian vessels and flew a Russian flag. A Russian pinnace advanced to meet them. The occupants had the Russian word of command. and so dispelled doubts. No sooner was the pinnace alongside than a grenade was thrown, killing a sailor. An eye-wit-ness reported that the torpedo boat’s gunners wore Germans.

A TRUE BILL,

PETROGRAD. November 1

The newspapers charge Turkey with following Germany's example and attacking a defenceless people under the spell of German gold, Krupp guns, and ambassadorial eloquence.

BULGARIAS INTENTIONS

LONDON, November 1

Bulgarian official circles reiterate Bulgaria’s intention to preserve neutrality. Servia states that the stories respecting the oppression of Bulgarians in Macedonia are entirely false, and have been issued with the object of inciting inroads of Bulgarian bands into Servian territory. The Servian Legation adds: “In consequence of this, confidence in Bulgaria is being strained dailv.”

A prominent Bulgarian diplomat points out that certain sections of Bulgaria are pro-German, but an overwhelming public opinion would prevent Bulgaria from identifying' herself with the enemies of Russia, her liberator, or Groat Britain. Bulgaria would immediately forsake her neutrality in the event of the Turks crossing the frontier.

TURKEY’S IXTERFEREXCE.

COMPLICATIONS INEVITABLE

ATHENS, November 1

Turkey's naval action has produced a sensation, and the Press are making disquieting forecasts regarding the chances of peace in the Near East. It is considered that complications are inevitable. After bombarding Novo-Rossiisk the Hamidieh landed bluejackets. The latter wore surrounded and made prisoners. Constantinople reports that the Grand Vizier sent an aide-de-camp to the Russian Embassy to inquire as to the accuracy of rumors regarding the Turkish naval raids.

Tho Bedouin invasion of the Egyptian desert east of the Suez Canal is confirmed in diplomatic circles.

INDIA AND TURKEY

THE VICEROY’S PROCLAMATION

CALCUTTA, November 1

The Viceroy has published a communique announcing throughout India Turkey’s unfriendly attitude. It deplores the endeavor of a Chauvinistic clement to drive Turkey to war for the benefit of Germany and Austria. Turkey’s secular cnemv.

The reception of the communique in outlying districts will not be known lor some days, but responsible Mohammedan leaders are already holding meetings in support of Great Britain, and prayers were offered up in the mosques for British success.

PRISONERS OF WAR

CAIRO, November 1

Five hundred Germans and Austrians have left Alexandria to be interned In Malta.

THE PURCHASE PRICE

COPENHAGEN. November 1

It is- reported that Germany gives Turkey £10.000,000 ns a preliminary war contribution. and also that Germany is - about to issue a war loan of £250.000,000.

IF INVASION IS ATI'EMPTED

LONDON. November 1

‘The Times,’ discussing editorially Mr IT, G. Wells's article on a possible invasion of England, endorses the statement that every possible man ought to be sent to the decisive area in France and Belgium. In the event of an invasion every man remaining in Great Britain could fight. The Government should tell them u liar they ought to do without further shirking.

FINANCTA L A RRANGEM ENTS

LONDON, November 2

The Treasury has arranged with the Bank of England, with a view to avoiding realisations on a largo scale of securities held us a cover on account of loans, that tho Stock Exchange shall provide an advance to certain classes of lenders to enable them to continue loami until the war is over. All hanks to which currency facilities are open have agreed not to press for repayment of loans or require a deposit for further margins for a year after tho conclusion of the war. Tire arrangements provide for advances np to 60 per cent, of the value of securities, and interest is fixed at I per cent, above the bank rale, with a minimum of 5 per cent.

MISCELLANEOUS,

AMSTERDAM. November 2,

A mysterious big lire occurred in the bazaar at Valona. near a magazine where quantities of ammunition were stoied. and this began to explode. Two hundred Italian marines landed and extinguished tho fire

SYDNEY. November 2.

It is officially notified through tho Press that no newspapers will be permitted to leave Australia until further notice. PEKING. October 51.

The crew of the wrecked German destroyer S9O, who were interned on tho Niuking Exhibition grounds, escaped on Friday, but were recaptured at Pul tow.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

SAVAGE FIGHTING IN FLANDERS., Issue 15640, 3 November 1914

Word Count
2,921

SAVAGE FIGHTING IN FLANDERS. Issue 15640, 3 November 1914

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