Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

KAISER GETTING BUSTLED.

HAS TO REVISE HIS PLANS.

GERMANS LEAVING DIXMUDE.

MASSING NEAR OSTEND.

ENEMY ADMIT RUSSIANS ARE PURSUING

TURKEY WILL FIGHT WITH GERMANY’S GLORIOUS ARMY.

SHOOT FOUR GERMAN OFFICERS.

SILENCING THE TSING-TAO FORTS.

ITALY GUARDS RUSSIAN INTERESTS.

Press Association—By

Telegraph—Copyright.

RUSSIA SEEKS MORE TRADE WITH BRITAIN. LONDON, November 1. The Russian Chambers of Commerce lay stress on tho splendid opportunity now offering for Britain to develop her trade with Russia in consequence of tho wholesale withdrawal of German trade. The public men of Russia are of opinion that such economic co-operation will form one of the strongest bonds of friendship.

ALLIES MAINTAINING POSITIONS

PARIS, fleober 31 (midnight).

(Received November 2. at 9.10 a.m.)

Official : We have progressed north wards to Sonan. and maintained our post tions everywhere else.

GERMANS SF.EM TO BE LEAVING DIXMUDE.

AMSTERDAM. November 1. (Received November 2, at 9.25 a.m.) Everything indicates a German r etreat from Dixrnude.

BLANKENBURGHE PIER BURNT.

AMSTERDAM. November 1 (Received November 2. at 9.25 a.m.)

The Germans burnt the pier at Blankenburghe. and ordered the people to leave the coast towns.

Many are fleeing to Holland. Fugitives Mate that the Germans began retreating th? moment tiring wabeard from the nuns in the direction of Thou rout.

Jllankenhcrghe is n fashionable bathingplace about nine miles E.N.E. of Ostend. ]

BRITISH AVIATORS DESTROY WAR

MATERIAL

AMSTERDAM, November 1

(Received November 2, at 9.25 a.m.)

British aviators bombed Gorman war material collided at Liebte. . eble ami Muchtervelde. Much damage was done. [Liehtervelcle is a manufacturing town 13 miles W.S.W. of Bruges.] ENEMY GATHERING NEAR OSTEND. A MSI El GUM. November I. (Received November 2. at 9.25 a.m.) The Germans have been further reinforced mi the coast line between Ostend and Knocke. and have thrown up more fortified trenches on the dune-. GERMANS EVACUATING. AMSTERDAM, November 1. (Received November 2, at 9.10 a.m.) The Germans have evacuated Lebheko and PdUivcn.

[Lchhcke is 18 miles E. by S. of Client.]

BELGIAN - ARTILLERY HAIM) AT IT.

HAVRE, November 1

'Received November 2. at 9.10 a.m.) Official ; Two Belgian batteries, coinprising eight guns, fired 8.000 rounds on the Yser in eight days, and the shells destroyed most of the German batteries which were unmasked.

GERMANS FEEL THE STRAIN

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 1

A Genuni prisoner taken at the Y>er said that an officer remarked : “ We can do nothing here yet. We must proceed. The bayonet attacks are a fearful hell.

There is a grtat stream of volunteers airiviijg, but when actually fighting many of them were anguished, and called upon their fathers and mothers. Weariness, the_ shock of fear, and the sights of death combined to break the soldiers’ nerve.

EAST PRUSSIAN FRONT.

GERMANS FAIL AFTER FIVE DAYS’ FIGHTING.

I'ETEOGRAD, November 1. (Received November 2, at 9.25 a.m.)

Official : The German attempt on the East Prussian front to break through the centre of the fortified position near Bakolarjevo failed after five days’ fruitless attacks.

The Gormans suffered tremendous Josses, and left large heaps of dead fronting our trenches.

Wc are advancing in several districts on the East Prussian front.

The Russians beyond the Vistula arc firmly occupying the position Leneviea-Lodz-Ostrovec.

The situation in Galicia is unchanged. [Ostrovcc is probably a mis spelling of Ostroviec. which is a town between Lublin and Opatow. |

WESTWARD OF WARSAW.

GERMANS ADMIT THAT RUSSIANS ARE PURSUING.

AMSTERDAM, November 1

(Received November 2, at 9.10 a.m.)

An official statement from Berlin is that the situation westward of Warsaw is still undecided. It adds ; “ Tho Russians are slowly pursuing us. We are still drawing up in battle array.”

THE MUD IN POLAND

(London ‘Times’ and Sydney ‘Sun’ Services.)

LONDON, November 1

The early winter, with its heavy rains and sleet and snow, is adding to the horrors of the fighting in Poland. The mud in the trenches reaches to the knees, and men who are forced to remain inactive get chilled to the bone. South of Warsaw the ground is so soft that the guns and transport waggons constantly stick, and many have been abandoned.

KING ALBERT IN THE TRENCHES,

AMSTERDAM, November 1

(Received November 2, at 9.10 a.m.)

King Albert had a narrow escape in the trenches. By a shrapnel bugst hia aide-de-camp was severely wounded, but the King was untouched.

TURKEY NOT VERY SURE

WHETHER SHE IS REALLY IN IT

EVIDENTLY BOUNCED BY GER MANY.

TURKS SHOOT GERMANS

LONDON, November 1

(Received November 2. at 9.10 a.m.)

Uniter states that certain sections of the Ottoman army are, resentful against the Germans, and that Turkish troops recently shot four of their German officers.

ITALY GUARDS RUSSIAN INTERESTS.

PETROGRAD, November 1. (Received November 2. at 9.10 a.m.) Russian interests in Turkey are entrusted to Italv.

THE ROUTE DISCLAIMS THE SHIPS’ RAIDS,

WASHINGTON, November 1

(Received November 2. at 9.10 a.in.) Tho Potto lias {informed the French Am ha.-sador that the warship raids ueouirod without the Porto's knowledge.

TURKS LOOKING TOWARDS PERSIA AND, INDIA.

ROME, November 1

(Received November 2. at 9.10 a.m.)

The Goeben is now the flagship of the (firman Admh.d Goscheii, who is eoin-mander-in-chicf of the 1 tirkish fleet. I lie crew arc exclusively German. The Breslau and the remainder of the Turkish warships are manned by mixed Tuveo-T’eutouic forces.

The Arab General Znkki Paehn commands the troops at Palestine. An army corps at Gainrun and Eiscmum i/t aimed at the Russians' two hundred thousand men who are defending the Caucasian frontier.

The 13th Army Corps at Bagdad, under Giamid Pasha, is intended to make an incursion into Persia towards India.

GERMANY PLAYS HER LAST CARD

ROME. November 1

(Received November 2. at 9.10 a.m.)

The Rueoian Ambassador at Rome describes the latest [incidents in Turkey as an indication that Germany is playing her lust card, but he says that the Turkish trick will not lead to the withdiawal oT a single soldier from the Austro-German frontier.

THE CRIMEA BOMBARDMENTS.

PETROGRAD, November 1. (Received November 2. at 9.25 a.m.)

The Hamidich's bombardment of Novo Ro.-siiek lasted for three hours.

She flew the Russian Hag as she approached. Kho tired two hundred shells, mostly against, petroleum tanks, merchantmen, and grain elevators. The Turks fired a hundred shells at Theodosia. Hills was the Breslau's job.]

QUEEN MARY'S APPEAL

WELLINGTON. November 2.

The Countess of Liverpool continues to receive handsome contributions fn response to Queen Mary’s appeal. Among the items announced this week are 18 pairs of socks knitted by a resident of Ohingaiti 72 years of age, 129 pairs of socks and'four dozen cholera belts collected by the Mayoress of Ekctahuna. 24 dozen cholera belts from Mrs Arthur Rhodes (Christchurch), and 2.000 cholera belts from the Mayoress of Christchurch. AN AIRMAN’S GRAVE. "In Belgium I saw a wrecked British aeroplane, and beside it the grave of the aviator. . . . At the head of the grave tho Germans had put a wooden cross, on which they had written ‘ Herr Flier, August 22, 1914.’ The Belgians had covered the grave with flowers. It is on the left-hand side of tho road as one walks south from Enghien to Ath, in a pear orchard, near a very old red-brick house with a square tower."—Richard Harding Davis, in tho London * Daily Telegraph.’ . AT NAMUR. "The awful sound of the shells approaching, the screeching, deafening crash as they burst, produced an effect upon me which has only completely shown itself since my return to civilisation. Within a few yards of that inferno, after the first shots. I felt cool and indifferent; to-day the mere noise of a motor car makes me jump with fright."—George Le Barre, in the ‘ Daily Graphic.* A DEAD MAN’S CHARGE. “ I saw a ghastly affair on Tuesday. A German cavalry division was pursuing our retiring infantry when we were let loose on them. When they saw us coming they turned and fled, at least all but one, who came rushing straight at us with his lance at the charge. I caught hold of his horse, which was half mad with terror, and my chum was just going to run the rider through when he noticed tho awful glaze in his eyes, and we saw that the poor devil was dead.”—A British trooper, in the ‘Daily Mail.*

THE TRUE SPIRIT. No finer story can be found than the manner in which the parent* of young Lieutenant Xavier de Caatlenau received the news of his death in battle (says the ‘Daily Telegraph’ correspondent). He was the youngest of six sons fighting for their country, and served in the army commanded by his father, General de Caste.l- - The general was dictating orders when an officer presented himself. “What is it?” asked the general, turning round. “ Sir,” replied the officer in a trembling voice, “your son Xavier has just been killed by a bullet in the forehead while attacking the enemy, who were repulsed.” The general remained silent for a minute, and then, turning again to the members of his staff, said “ Gentlemen, let u» continue,” and he resumed the dicta tion of his orders. Madame de Castelnau, with the remainder of her family, had retired to a house in the south, and when the news of Xavier's death reached the chateau it was decided to entrust the parish priest with the task of breaking the news. Madame de Castelnau was in the habit of attending Mass every morning, and on this occasion she appeared before the priest had decided what he was to say. She noticed his distress and shaking hand, and, thinking as always of her husband and six sons, asked the simple question “Which?” The 'Pelrograd correspondent of the ‘Morning Post’ tells how after one of the fights in which a regiment of Horse Grenadiers took part, its colonel, a member of the ancient historic Russian house of Lopukhin, received the day's report, ami the following colloquy ensued : "Casualties, killed, and wounded, two hundred.” “How many men wounded?” The total was given. ” Officers?” “Officers killed, one.” “Who was it?” “Cornet Lopukhin.” The sergeant who tellq the talc says that his commander's face never flinched, but that after a moment he asked where the

body was, went and kissed his dead son without shedding a tear, and said “Now, hack to duty.” “ And they say.” concluded the sergeant, ” that it wae his only son.”

THE SAVAGE GERMANS.

Here arc two typical reports of German outrages taken from a reputable and independent American newspaper. They form parts of a report f rom the front: “ I am in a small village on the extreme left, and can sec tho horrible cruelty of the Germans to the inhabitants. We have gof three girls in the trenches who came to us for protection. One had no clothes on, having been outraged by the Germans. 1 have given her my shirt, and divided my rations among them. Another poor girl has just come in, having had both her breasts cut off. Luckily I caught, a Uhlan officer in the act. and with j rifle at 500 yds killed him. Now she is with us, but, poor girl ! 1 am afraid she will die. She is very pretty and only about 19. and only lias a skirt on.” "True strategy .nnsists : n hitting your enemy, and hitting him hard. Above- all, you must inflict on the inhabitants of invaded towns the maximum of suffering, so that they' may become sick of (he struggle, and may bring pressure to boar on their Government to discontinue it. Yon must leave the people through whom yon march only their eyes to weep with. In every case tho principle which guided our genera! was that war must be made terrible to the civil population, so that it may sue for peace."—Bismarck. This explains everything, from Domain onwards.

ODDMENTS

I hat a portion of the Indian contingent could have been landed in China to take part in ihe bombardment of Kiao-Cliau without my idea being entertained of their despatch is testimony to the secret- manner in which our troops aio handled. These will probably lie the Indians who were railed across Canada, ns described in the ‘Star.’ Just about that time the whole of the vessels of the C.P.R. --best known a- (lie Empress line—weie commandeered, but for what purpose no one simniscd. The reason is supplied today. Major Robert Masefield, of The King's (Shropshire Light Infantry). who was killed in action Inst- week. was : the eldest so l ’ of Mr V V. Masefield, a well-known retired sheep fanner, ,-f Akaroa. The late Major Masefield (repott-s the Christchurch ‘ Press‘l went to England when nine years old with his father. He was educated there, and subsequently joined the army. In 1912 he was appointed major in the second battalion of the Shropshire Regiment, based on Trimttlgherry (for Ragoon) ; was in England on furlough when the war broke out. and was appointed to the first battalion for active service with the British Expeditionary Force, Major Masefield married ;vu English lady. The French (lag is blue, white, and red in vertical strip,es. The Russian is a blue saltier on a white ground, while the Imperial Standard is a two-headed eagle on a yellow ground. The Prussian flag is black and white, the Imperial German flag, adopted in 1871. having in addition the eagle of the Hohenzollerns. The ordinarv German flag is black, white, and red in horizontal stripes. The British Union Jack, of course, docs not need describing.

"Then they came on our bayonets. Squealing mid holding up their hands they wore, and those at the hack shoving them on all the time. Fast as we could we'd throw ’em off our bayonets the way we could get at the next one. It was like tossing hay.” The little Irishman paused a little, as though his mind was travelling hack over things he had seen. Then he began again : “In the trenches for hours we were, and raining all the, time, and they didn't come. We came out to get a hit to eat and a rest, and while the tea was boiling they attacked ns. Sheer had luck! We never got that tea.”—A correspondent in the ‘Daily Mail.’ “Drapers’ Assistant ” sends ns 5s for the Belgian fund. A Greymonth wire says: Flower Day here, in aid of the Belgian fund realised £145. The 1m 11 receipts added in this amount bring the total to over £2OO, the result of the Ladies’ Committee’s special effort.

THE SWORDS OF INDIA

(Dedicated to His Highness, the Maharajah of Mysore.) They said, the gentle Germans said ; “When we, the mighty host, attack This England whom the nations dread, India will strike her in the back." But you another talc unfold ; You offer treasure, and your words Cry to their Emperor: “Sire, behold Our swords, our myriad swords!" They said, the jealous Germans said : “ This bloated England, like a beast. Too Jong her coward soul lias fed At tho rich manger of tho East !" But you who scorn the tyrant’s lash. Our Peace the shield of all your hordes, Under tho Flag of England flash Your swords, your warrior swords! They said, tho jeering Germans said : “India, who waifs, will not be loth”— Her conscripts’ blood be on the head Of them who lied about us both ! India, with us you live and breathe, Our steadfast will with yours accords; God knows our pride when you unsheathe Your swords, your faithful swords! —Harold Begbie, in tho ‘Daily Chronicle.’

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141102.2.50

Bibliographic details

KAISER GETTING BUSTLED., Evening Star, Issue 15639, 2 November 1914

Word Count
2,565

KAISER GETTING BUSTLED. Evening Star, Issue 15639, 2 November 1914

Working