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TnK *<.-}<■■■ of til,. Sc!,; ( GollimiUcc 1.(1I" iiy the House of Freights and He, iv.-utal Ires inquire Shipping, relating m l i eight v and charges v. i bv si i , pj.in r ■ ompanies oti liii. f lomiuioirs exports and imports merely indicates how liti.lt; La.-, y>-t been done towards :ul jlistinu. over to a reasonable extent. a business that has been rerun cut iy vexations in jec‘,mt years to producers rial merchants. ami how much require* lt> he done-. liy Parliament before xl;o needed adjustment is made. Tire Committee recommend that a. permanent board bo establiriied; with dearly defim-d powers of inquiry regarding the trade. industries, and commerce of the country. There the. matter remains, and i*#. Jiktiy to remain tor a Join; time. Political circunistamoos, which are liable to change like tlio opinions of politicians- and tlm exigencies of trade, justify a deferment of parliamentary consideration and, governmental adieu. Possibly, jogi.-iators will not r/g/et. the me-virabt: dcfcsii!, of a question mat is vitally m-we. important than many .-.f the questions r.cw usurping tin time and thought of members Patliamcnt. who seem'loth to end an unpromahio auasion. There are so many harassing matters to contend with before a General Ejection that the prospect of shelving a difficult question for another year must be welcome to the leading administrators, who will have to explain many of their shoitcomingri during this remarkable and unsatisfactory fcessiou.

Tho pressure of lime and political circumstances, however, can only ho temporary, and the Oomnnioal, who are confident of returning to power, ami the Opposition, who arc equally cocksure of regaining Iho Treasury Tenches, should at once include in their respective, programmes definite proposals lor dealing with a. conirn-arcifd probif’in that In's long served as a. grievance to producers and the public, upon whom falls always Iho burden of inflated freights. Political parties need not hesitate to enter into keen competition as regards devising practicable schemes for dealing reasonably with an admittedly difficult problem. Th-tne is scope here for bold statesmanship. The Parliamentary Committee reported that. in their opinion, tho> increase of 25 per cent, on general cargo was to some extent justified by the increased cost of insurance through the imposition of a war risk, the extra test of coal and provisions, and tho probable shortage of cargo on returns from Great Britain. But they aro also of tho opinion—a strong opinion, indeed ! that'as conditions become normal the increase should be abolished. There-is-a mighty lot of political wisdom, surely, in the stronger of their opinions. As for the opinion that the increase of 23 per cent, v,as justified to sonic extent, the- public can only take it at il-s face value. It is not supported by convincing evidence. As a. matter of fact, a prominent representative of shipping admits that, as events at s-ea have turned out so far, the 25 per cent, increase, was not justified, and that it does not iu.-w, and never did, represent, a provision proportionate to the actual risks of war. Possibly, the committee obtained more convincing evidence than that possessed by at. least one candid shipping representative, but apparently it is not to be. made available to the public, ft is nnr proposed to print the evidence tendered to the committee, as some of it was -given ionlidciuially. Was tho confideniial < videnee the only evidence of value'; if not, the ‘'open'’ evidence should be marie available to producers, merchants, and those of the public who arc keen to know why it is that- whenever external conditions become abnormal there is feverish activity in this country to increase prices and charges t-o as to insure against any 7iossl.ble diminution of profits. Tb-‘ committee an- to be commended for tcareful work in examining tinshipping conditions a.nd charges due to tho war. and for their recognition of the oe-e.t •- ' :. ■oovm.uu,Vit. board. Put- tl-.0-.u work v.'o blvvc been tn vuuv It the (b.a-vcrmni-ii!. or a succeeding tlovornment, do not resolutely undertake, io introduce a definite a 11. so for controlling, or at least rendering more stable, the changing seal.-.-- of shipping freights ami charges.

A rni’QiT.xt exiue vsioi in the publications of the Mother Land atA Now l ins time of crisis is tlraf World. ue are living in a. newworld. The, old order and 'be hope:- 1 > whi.h u gave, birth, the visions "{ closer internal ionrd friendships and of revolutionary social i-ofotnis, have undergone a. swift and terrible tvansfoimatio-,. I’• •1 1 the- change u.-hcivcl in by the, Gennaii war machine to the- roar of cannon, riio rick c«f cities, and the cry of ci’-ind !e-s outraged h"in:s is me, such a chance, as liial, which 'hr highest and best minds of England welcomed in the early days the l-’rvueh Ivt-vnhirini). What. Napoli oni.-m nil imaridy licrairr we know ; wl;;u n meant in its beginnings was

a pass' m;jbe, revolt again-.* the callous indifference gg.d titiies> arrogance of the, privileged eimf-s tltat for centuries had dominated and cru.dnd not only the people *>f France, bn- "f eveiy European country, and, :r a mod died deucy, of England horse! f. W here I; egli-iid differed from her cunt* -1 ii | ei.ii ics- was t hut. her rulers never allowed poira’ac im-d-asis a gain. -I class ?egi<>larioii in develop into more than the linen; of civil war. Punish monarchy and eiatesiopn have dun.ig the last hundred seats honestly striven in govern. red in lieu- fiivn interest.-.. leit fo.- and <ut behalf of 'be people as a. whole. Tola'.- ‘lie | o 11 ! i «i( progressive advancement m -o,ini well-being has been savagely broken I y the hatchet, of tlic German War Lord leu-king his way :.-* his goal, mespeeor .--ex or aye. "And lied, so long " w.-rsldjifK-d, dc-pau- as a lamp without "od; tor a. t inv s is heard ImaiF-a thro’ ‘’the Ami, mom a. girdles- mi•• descending ” t-> In- as t v-. ’ it -s net. ibeief'ire. a change much as a Mt.-ison to iho auirtaiifiu and bnicli-rv 11 ; :i h.ui ap.e which, tin co muni (is ago. <-v; v intelligent uyt.ii and «-oiean we-uld have indignantly vejiuiiiato.[ a- possible. '.I he eiuu g v , againsti lerinany is that sir- has dcli'iK-iately and in -.-no blood set, cum o. .destiny all Fiat go centmi'-s of lit 1-ivit.ui civilisat i in have established. Hers is an insolent, l;ui<la-tiou iiinl appeal to tho hriito in m.-iii.*- and to Fore.- as tin* supreme arbiter. Wo icpuai. timt tie- wor'd ought to have known thcrci

tilings, if w-as not < terma-ny which spake, oi them in tsv;-'t. 'the. (let ma ns, through lireir Kntnor and legislation, have bean proclaiming them from the housetops for nearly 110 years. And the outside, world, England moiM o| nil, either laughed at ih'-ni »r vxcwd tlmin, or in. tomn casts delondcd them. Even the* atrocities in l.oitvain and ..Uplines and a, M v, l'o o: i.tner desolated tow rat and vil-e.g.-s v, ere long s;ncc, line,; toned. I rutr(sen years afr .i (he, Kaiser urged upon his (loon,-, ■ ;s pe ;;ii uho fal! into lour hands " a' i'.onr m.oi.y; gain a. repiiml ion like ‘■rlie Huns under .Aitihi," T dav his trnm it avo improved cm the ini,-units of the. Dark Ages, and the slaught v-t.- of Ids, In*’.o sin ink abashed Beloit- thorn of ono "hr., nt tip- fell glmi* of .a world-wide publieity. blasphemous!;,• lifts his hands ir, Ih'.’ivcn and invokes upon his arms th® hcncdict ion of the Almighty, England knew ami was silent. It, was t,.d till tho war monster .sprang first at Belgium in order Hint it might (lie bettor tear the, hern, trout Franco that- England awoke to the reality ot Imr own danger. But 1 hough .slow t-, lake offence, she was not slow t<> move, lit an instant tho clamor of partisan tongues died down ; domestic, differences won- put (Hi one side; and the Knghind of (Inmany's dreams vanished into thin aii . The. Kaiser had appealed to the swoid. "Very well," said .Mr Bonur Taw. " may the t-tri>vd system for which he stands, perish by the sword." Jt was

i.cloic the same van audience to width these words were spoken that the Prime Minister made his declaration that sent a responsive thrill around the Empire : " 1 would rather see, England blotted out” than that she should have stood by acquiescent while (ho German honbhacked their way through Belgium. Then, as tic full effect of this never io ■be-forgotten outrage upon humanity res.-, in imamnafiou. .before him, Mr Asquith added : “It is not a, material, but i' .spiritual c-anilict," in which the Empire and mankind are engaged. In saving this tho Prime Minister pierced to tho very heart and spud of the conflict, liie powers of darkness have once moro joined issue with tho powers of light. Germany' lias notified an amazed and horrified world that .she. will “ create ex- " ampler? which by their frightfulness “ would he a warning to the whole conn“try,” and sho hqs bettered her word.

At this hour there is no Belgium. All that is loft of her is represented by smoking ruins, devastated fields, a homo Jess people, conquered cities, and a gal-lant-remnant of her sons with their King at their head fighting for the last few miles of soil that are yet left them. We need not labor the scene. There arc limes in the Jives of individuals when the souse of grief finds no relief in words, times that “ whisper the o'erfntlight heart and bid it break/’ And as with individuals, so it is with nations. What does or what can the world think of these things? What, let- na ask, dues America think? V resident Wilson sometime in August entreated his countrymen to remain neutral. “It is nob our war,” lie pleaded. “We “can do most by severely abstaining “ from oven the semblance of an indica- “ tion on which side our sympathies “lie.” True, this was before Louvain and Tennondo and Rhcims. America, in any case, must be the solo judge of her own honor. But history, in turn, will weigh her in the balances and pronounce judgment on her conduct at this supremo hour in the life net of Belgium, or of England, or of Europe, but of mankind, flow infamously petty is it for an American journalist to- accuse tho Press Bureau—a. body of English gentlemen—of keeping hack news of German “ successes " and of blackening tho German character in order to win American opinion. If America, has not already, and of her own free will, formed an opinion on German policy and German methods of attaining it, then tho shame will be. hors, not England’s; for at. this late, hour there can he no justification for a. pica of ignorance.

Ik iho elector? of Dunedin West take, .MV AW E. J. Maguire. who A Labor opened hiu campaign lust Liberator. night as a straight-out

Labor candidate, as seriously or, he. takes lijrasclf he suetd-i havo no difficulty in succeeding in Parliamentone of the ablest- Laboriles the Dominion has produced. It is to bo suspected, hmvover, that ho will leant in frond time that political electors need more than a wordy assurance of a parliamentary candidate’s own value us a politician. -As a. matter of fact, tlie only circumstance in file meeting last night, which made a lively impression upon the funeei* of the electors present, and reminded them of their rights in the important lju«.it.ess of choosing a representative, was the merry and economical entertainment provided by, tevcia! shrewd workers, who “wanted to know, you know.’’ The vest was apparently accepted as no more impressive than tiin roar of a (lain in a tunnel. The candidate was given a- courteous hearing, and the hostility of tlso majority of the large audience was generously expressed. Ah- Maguire claimed at the outset to be “a, living

“monument of a typical workingman, and ‘ a straight-out Labor candidate with a “ broad, cornpielicnsivo ptogra-mme.'’ but. faded, after a long, robust, harangue, to ft cure a, vote of confidence. The majority of the audience appeared to be unwilling (•-> t-ako him and his rnincdia! programme with his own scriotmness and confidence, and preferred to express in a, formal vote of thanks their gratitude for his eagerness to uplift the cause- of Labor by means of Proportional lleprtwntaibti, the initiative and Referendum and tho Power of Bocal!, by a prudent scheme of Naval Defence, by the unification of Local Government, by a syst-rm of Preferential Trade within the Empire and with Imperial Allies, by tho prelection of female innocence, by the promotion of tho Christian duties of marriage, and by many other means besides. Lot it lx; understood that- .Mr Maguire displayed a reasonably good knowledge of the principles of politics, and a genuine appreciation of the need for innumerable reforms. Re also showed an uncompromising contempt for the Liberal-Labor combination. and gave it as his cpinion that “ Lib-Labistn " had been the curse of Xcw Zealand, in that It- bad ;undei,:d Hie workers and undermined the solidarity of Labor. Put he was lamentably weak and inadequate in the matter of submitting definite proposals for the improvement of social, iiiditstria], commercial, and political conditions. Ifo dealt in genetalit-i*’:-, and expressed (hem tediously ; and the majority of (ho doctors, who aro tiled, of political harangues, rather welcomed the merriment at tho end, the merriment that proves so disconcerting to parliamentary candidates, arid is as the handwriting on tho wall. There were several tobust features in tho meeting which • helped to relievo il» general tedium. It is seldom that a, chairman candidly informs a tensing heckler that, he is a ■'liar’'; more seldom still does a, candidate, perturbed by an nyfiwhclming vote- of gentle hostility, held up iris hand in support of n hopeless vote, of confidence in hinisd;!

TftKfir: never was a time when peace on eartii was universal, and ThO Passing of the happenings of tothe Pacifists, day bear too plainly the interpretation tlui t the much-desired halcyon period is as far off as ever. Paleolithic man attained supremacy over the monsters of the prime, and maintained it- by brute force and primitive cunning. He smashed in the skulls of the creatures that were good to his carnivorous taste, and cracked (heir larger bones at

his leisure for the purpose, of old,lining the. marrow that wa«. no doubt, as much, a bnntic-boMehe to him ns. it is to Die gourmet of tn-day. He liafled Iris stone hatchets .and chipper! them to get a .-utting edge, and so on through the long ages of bronze and iron became more adept at death-dealing. Legend ami history tell in the plainest fashion that bloodthirstiness has been, characteristic of all epochs the world over. Thu rinse, of Cain has Iwen merited by every nation, civilised or savage, that- wo know anything about, and brotherhood has been too often forgotten. The early conceptions of Jehovah were of a God whoso chosen people were marauders and conquerors, as merciles.s in their triumphs as are the cruelties attributed to German soldiers to-day or to the- Turks in their Macedonian atrocities.

Tho evangel of the- Prince of Peace, preached for nearly 2,000 years, has not modified the war lust one iota. Swords have not been turned into pruning hook" ; on the contrary, eve have learned tho art of war in a more scientific and destructive manner than the men of sword and buckler, of bow and. arrow, ever dreamed of. Taking scalps, head-hunting, cracking skulls, and blood-letting, as in barbaric days. were, all bad enough; but to-day we see Christian nations all praying to the same God for victory, and Jetting hell loose from diabolical instruments of destruction that have in a, single month sent hundreds of thousands of heroes and bloody-minded combatants to their long account. There is a. Palace, of Peace at The Hague, but in spite of its conferences and it? arbitration courts the most sanguinary encounters the world has ever known have been taking place for weeks past- almost under the shadow of its walls.

For tbs past 10 years or so praiseworthy efforts have been made to bring into being a kind of world-wide Imperial Socialism under which international self-interest and co-operation would be placed in sueh a convincing light that armies and navies would only bo kept up to polices tho world. A young journalist, lit the- person of Mr Norman Angell, has, with great force,

persistency, -and Jtif-eJUjrt’iiro, ciidv.rwed to show that f lie economic oneness of civilised mankind, the law of international, . commercial, and financial denrndena; and interdependence, show the. folly and futility of war. Many saw in his Inuchuros an ideal of penc-o pofsildo of mtliraliou in our own time. His ■..•uiilrihui inns were heralded as a revolutionary work that bade fair to shatter conventional ideas about international politico ; romewhat corresponding to the epoch-making ‘ Origin of .Species ’ in the realm of biology. This apostle, with his olive branch, preached his evangel before the United Service In-slitulion, the Institute of Bankers of Great Britain, anil groups of German intiveiv.ity students, ami Ids books .have had a world-wide circulation. In Germany his reception was not always sympathetic, although paciii/t views arc espoused by many German profefors, and notwithstanding tho emphasis tho lecturer laid on the genius of modern Germany in tho direction of sys.U-nns;a.tion and organisation Mr Angell, in his last series of collected addresses, published tins year, reaffirms his previous contentious: that “save only in a narrow and juridical sens* the nations which form the Emopean community are not sovereign, nor independent, nor entities, nor rivals, nor advantageously predatory: nor docs the exercise or possession -of tho means of physical coercion determine- the relative advantage of each.” Two factors—the need for co-operation to find srMenance, and the decline in the effectiveenss of physical force as a. moans of seeming eevire.s ;n a co-operative process of any complexity —have, lie coni ends, destroyed n >t merely the economic but. the moral and intellectual unity and homogeneity of Suites : they 1 la-vo rendered tho exercise of force by one State against .-mother, lor economic, moral, or intallectuol purposes, futile, because ineffective and irrelative to the end in view. “Any State." ho aigues. "destroying wealth in another must- destroy wealth in it-.-; own, since, the unit intersects the iwo areas." Nations are no longer separate organisms, but interdependent parts of the same organism. For these and a score of other reasons, put in a. very forcible manner, the lender in tho new pacifist movement concludes that the development from lomnulsiou to freedom, from militarism to commerce, is inevitably drifting towards tho filial -elimination of the military factor. How glad Hie civi'd-cd world would be to see in tho events of today a. millennial dawn vb-ho-ut- a- bloodstain upon it. Without- doubt there is a growing revolt, against- /ruling international difference.-, through tli-f nrbitr.Tmi’nt of thu /.word, against- hecatombs, „f ifi,. picked manhood of a. nation lying slaughtered on battlefields, famous cities reduced In heaps of mins, count ries la fit desolate, and trade dish-.-. red. Logically and from a humanitarian point of view such conditions ought- to be- impossible, unthinkable; but as b-ng as tln-rc arc Mud Mug.l;in f.-cyn l or l.’iuop- . with followers blind cm nigh or unscrupulous enough to follow their banner, wo can only thank God that wickedness in high places is on Hi-.- cv-e of failing with a great

crash—.like Lucifer, never I.> hope again--and that the British Empire will he largely detrimental in the overthrow.

In moving the adoption of the report of the Finance. Committee at the- meeting of the Hospital Board last, evening, the chairman drew attention to the. fact that the sketch block plans submitted by'the architects showing the placing of the secondary hospital buildings on the property at present owned by the boaid, and also the placing of buildings assuming that the adjoining property be acquired. had been referred to the honorary medical staff and the medical superintendent for report-, the idea being that the .--taif should have an opportunity of going over the plans on the ground, tie thought the position of affairs would bo- found to be quite satisfactory by some members of tin lomiminify. ami particularly to rum member of the medical profession, who. nr. the annual mooting of the Hospital batmday Assn; iation, had made certain remarks winch were quite uncalled for. Tho board had made every effort to expedite matt cry. but- unless the necessary fonvcniencu especially the water—were on the ground, if was not possible tor the ttorb to Ire. carried out-. Out of the ik>o,iJoo to be spent on jeik-f works the Works Commit tec <-f the City Council, with a- view of providing iirmiedir.t« employment yesterday instructed the- domrrei and the city engineer to put in hand cotiain earth works that, will improve the, approaches to the, City, pr---Vided that tic* lb lief CommiiMv, will i-iiii-sidioo the cost, of same. It is expected that a start win ix- made at- the- beginning of next week with the works to ba selected by the. chairman and engineer. Many jx-sple ask : What is Halluv.o'en, and why do people keep it’.' Folklore is always of inteio-St In many. There if undoubted evidence that a- iVmivai tie lit;','! about the same lone <■!’ tin- year with similar mysterious rites in many dilfcreut parSfl of the world Jong b-Hf.r.s Ecots folk took "baud oT ” and kept it. Sentiment is a big factor in our Jiv,c. and Hallowe'en stirs ha!lowed mcmonc..- in the old folks, and their enthusiasm is catching. Tho ffstival is of special interest 10 tho young one.', as. i; jV nn occasion when the myssteriotis denizens of tire spb it la ml tie* fairies —especially those of them who are believed tr. have sumo centred ovr r-curiship and inarriaac. ,-vc usually active. It, is. doubtful if Hallowe'en wuald li .vnmmlx red or kept if IJrs,:;- bud, md wiiticn lbs immortal poem about it. tie has embalmed it inverses i,l r-.TCiuuai bcCi'e.-l.

if he quc-Unn e f providing .suitable payment for a. foster mother to take charge of children, so that a. widow might go out and earn liei livelihood, was brought under the notice of the Otago Hospital and Charitable Aid Hoard last, evening by the secretary of the Society for the- Protection of Women and Children, who wrote starting that the matter had been discussed by her committee, with the result that it had been decided to approach the board in the direction indicated. Several rases in point, were quoted, and the society further asked the board to make provision for one. or two foster mothers to take i barge of children temporarily In -neb ci.-.t’s, 11 was reported that the chairman of the Benevolent Commits cr. had replied to Die CTr-'t that in cases such ns: were piloted, if lie were hi formed, lie would do his best to arrange for w hut. was icpuircd. but the eari's mentioned wore only isolated one;?, and on several ocr.v.iiim; the p nest i' ai of a i reehe had i 'eon , onsidered. but could not be arcai'v'ci!. The board approved of I hi* reply, and Mr Talkovs iiiriln r slated that the mailer had been before the board several time.?, and mi rue occasion a eomnpti.ee. bad been set up to go into Die whole pupation. Foster mothers would lie required for pr.a-ti< rally ail over the town.

Tho fin* nt 'iossri l.mw and Keeshn'* motor garage at Napier yesterday cumril damage t«» tho extent ••! £IO.OOO. Tbbuilding was mainly of roucreic, and ll- ■ walls aiv undamaged. Four or five fns Were removed before the flro reached tlicm. but 16 others were- damasc-d, son;? absolutely beyond repair. Several or 1 Ire rare were not insured, and those damaged include .some, vary valuable ones, 'riie building vat-; insured for £1.650. ami the stock in trade and plant for £I.CCO. both in ibo Ocean office. Tho lots on the latter risk will bo considerable. The Post Office ha vinos Bank ii-lum-for the .Sepiombcr•quarter, compared with the corresponding period of last year, are as follow ; —Sentembev quaiter. 1914 : Deposits. £2,807,734: withdrawal-. £2.285.907; excess of deposits, £181.825. September ipiaru-r. 1915: Deposit-• , £2.804,450; withdrawals. £2.775.495; excess of deposit... £28.964. The Post and Telegraph revenue for the September quarters of 1914 and 1915 was as follows, the figures for 1915 being given in parentheses ;—Postal revenue ; Private box and bag rents, £827 (’£3l9) money orders commission. £5.650 (£4,147)*; stamps sold, £103,570 (£158,0901; postal note commission. £2.6C3 (£2,622]; miscellaneous, £259 (£170) ; total postal revenue, £170,723 (£165.850). Telegraph revenue ; Telegrams, £B° 1 75 (£76.556) ; telephone ' exchanges, £4.753 (£5,100): miscellaneous, £737 (£853); total telegraph revenue, £95.669 (£82,614). Tot-d Post and Telegraph revenue. £264.598 (£248.474). Mr Paulin’s forecast : —Squally N.W. to >S.W. wind?, with ruin, .d-'-et. and snow showers.

The Master Balters' Association of Auckland have decided (says air Association wire) ii> increase the price of bread to 4lcl per two-pound loaf. Oar ('loinwcll correspondent, wires; Decidedly unseasonable weather prevails. On Wednesday an exceptionally cold storm /wept over the district, and. to-day equally cold weather in being experienced—asoutherly rain, with snow on the mountains. The condiiions arc- unfavorable to sheep-owners, as lambing in the pastoral country m now pencral. The Commissioner of Crown Lands, accompanied by members of the -engineering stalfdhof the Cromwell Development ]xirty, were engaged all clay ycslc-rdiy on the company’s land, considering the mat lor of roads. The company are reported to have all the details for the settlement of tho acquired homestead blocks practically completed. Mai.v questions wore put, to Mr W. E. •L Mag.. ;rc, Lalmr candidate for Dunedin West, at Ids meeting last evening, and for a, time the feeling wa.s somewhat hostile. One quest inner alleged that ever since the vnr.didate camo to Dunedin his career had been erratic. Mr Maguire immediately challenged the doctor to prove his words on a platform at his peril. Later there was a hot exchange of words between tho chairman and anothoi- doctor. The chairman said ho did not intend to say too much about “ .-.trike-breakers’ ” unions, when avoire interjected: “ You can’t. Yon belong to one your/df" Tho Chairman rote,vied ; “You are a liar.” A vote of confidence in tho candidate v.as negatived. The Green Island Borough Council’s drainage proposals, as submitted to «a roeent meeting of the Drainage Board, came before the Works Committee of the latter body to-day, when the committee decided that they could not sec their way to recommend the board to undertake any other work outside the. area already vested in the hoard. A P.A. telegram from To Kniti states that n prisoner named Harconrt alias Jlumnirmd and Hackctt, who is wanted on several charges of fal.-o pretences, wh'lo being escorted lrom New Plymouth to .Auckland, jumped from the 2 a.m. express just after it left To Kniti. Tho escape,- knows tho country well. Tho police arc scouring the district. A Foxton message state; that at- the local S.M. Cuiirij this morning Davis, a milk vi.-ndvr, was ji.-.ed £2O and costs for telling milk containing 20 ptr cent, of water. The Magistrate (Air Boynton) severely commented upon the abuse of article..- o; load v.-Jncn so many depended upon, instancing women and children.

Last evening the choir of the Morningtnn Methodist Church hold their annual social in tho hall. A large parly assembled, including the church trustees, and a pleasant evening was spent. Tributes to the value and efficiency of the choir were ex pre-red bv the Rev. AV. Greensl.ido and Mr (;, A. sr.-cnc

Then.) should be more co-opora-tion amongst fishermen so that they may reap more adequately _ tiio Ixmefit of their labors, says Professor Prince, Commissioner of Canadian Fisheries, in his preliminary report to the New Zealand Cloven invent on the fisheries of this Dominimi. fishery .societies might, in his opinion, be founded at tho various ports. If tho Government were disposed to assist the fishing industry by loans or grant-, the. best results would be accomplished by such loans or grants being made to associations or fishery .societies, rather than to individuals.

Liquid Par.i.nin, “ Tlirec Star' 1 brand, t-'ic purest, for inte-rn;il use. Wilkinson and Son, ctemi.-its; os largo bottles.—[Advr.'l Watson's Iso. 10 is a little dearer than most whtekiss, but is worth the, money.— [Aclvt.'J If you wish the services of Mr Morris personally, he now makes portraits at, his homo or garden studio, hoi (ieorco street; telephone bh9__...^\g v pj T'l'.l annu-xl Hallnwt'ei; festival of the Dnnciiiii Burns Club takes piace in tlie (iarrisuu Hall tu-nighl. Old-nmc customs will be recalled, and a- c.ipita.l nmd.cai prosrrummo will bo given. -N. *lance will be held, after the cotJceri-. “Have one with me.'’ “Thunks, J will. Til have Watson’s Mo. 10, plea.se."—[Advt-.] Hr Rod ford ■"'ill ‘peak on the Prnhibirio.i question in the Octagon io-mtmw at, 8 p.m. Ho will bo asoUtcd by studetna of Knox College. A glass of Apeighi's beer nt lunch and supper is be::er than all the ten in Chinn.— [Advt.] Tho official opening: run of the Otago Hot or Club will take price to-morrow afternoon, having 1 he. Dunedin inihvay siatisn at 2.15 o’clock. Tin; rendezvous is Brighton, aud but- water, tea, milk, and sugar will be provided bv courtesy of the Brc,hi o:l Improve n 1 : 111. >Sc.ci rt y.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141030.2.38

Bibliographic details

Evening Star, Evening Star, Issue 15637, 30 October 1914

Word Count
4,867

Evening Star Evening Star, Issue 15637, 30 October 1914

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