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AMUSEMENTS

f J I'LAZA PICTURES. I i The programme now being screened at > the Plaza Picture, l'alace i-- proving immensely popular. To start, the films are all new, not having previously been nin through a machine. " '1 lis star picture i is. 'Sons of the Sea,' which, like all pat- ■ | riotic films being shown at the present i j juncture, is exceedingly popular. The j other supporting pictures, which include i comedies and dramas, are above the ave- [ rage. The , same programme will be • screened this evening. i | —The Great European War, 1914. I To-morrow's programmo promises to be ■ J an exceptionally good one. and >6 descrip- ' I tive of the great European War, 1914. It I will show the German pretext" (the 36j sa.ssmation of the Crown Prince of AusI trial, war between Germany and France, the Kaiser receiving England's ultimatum, the historic scene in the British House of Commons, the Prime Minister, Sir Edward Grey, Winston Churchill, and John. These pictures arc exceptionally well filmed, and should continue to attract crowded houses at the Plaza. HAYWARDS' PICTURES. '('lie quality of the pictures of the etirj rent programme at the Octagon Hail cerI tainly justi/ies the large attendances which nightly fill the hall. The principal film is a graphic one illustrative of the life of General Villa, who figured bo prominently m the .Mexican turmoil. The same pictures will be shown to-night. FULLERS' PICTURES. Thy current programme at the Kind's Theatre embraces a wide and pleasing variety of subject:. " Ada Neiisen Up to Her Trick;-,,' a comedy film, heads the hill, and it is well supported by the other pictures, including views of the war in Europe. The same programme will be repeated to-night. QUEEN'S PICTURES. ' Orders Under Seal ' continues to attract large numbers at the Queen's Theatre. The intense, interest with -which the picture is watched indicates that it, has struck a popular vein. As a war drama on the fagciiialin.l subjects of national intrigue and ioieign spies it Mauds pre-eminent. It will be repeated this evening. ARTHUR ALEXANDER RECITAL. All music lovers shcuid note that the above important event takes place to-mor-row evening at Ruins Hall, at 8.15. From the intor<v.t taken it is safe to assume that a crowded house will greet, this artist, who has ftncccivsfuby given recitals in ! many of the musical centres in England [ and on the- Continent, iiie programme contains many interesting items, special attention being given to modern Russian I music, which will no heard for the. first time in the Dominion, and we note that the programmes contain full analytical notes, on same. ■RUNTY PULLS THE STRINGS.' Mr E. J. Carroll, by arrangement with J. C. Williamson, Ltd., will present Mr and .Mrs Graham Moffat and their company of Scottish players in Mr Moffat's Scotch comedy ' Runty Pulls the String,?,' at His Majesty's Theatre on Monday, November 9, for a season of six nights and a matinee. It is described as a play straight from life, showing what things were like in Scotland in 18t>0—the crinoline period, as a matter of faeC-dealing with those Eood old people «ho would draw ih-» blinds on Sundays. " Runty" is a nicest delightful character. She is almost a*s lovable afi Peter Pan. She was evolved in the forti'e, Scots brain of Mr Graham Moffat, made her curtsey (in crinoline) to the critics, and bounded into favor. For ever a year New York raved about her. For 16 months London paid her homage, and she broke records. Runty is not a meddler, though she dues pull the strings. She is a manager. Reautitul. capable, and virtuous, sh • emerged shyly on to the social platform, saw things jioinc; awry, and took charge, to the satisfaction of all. 'Runty Pulls the Strings' was the great success, nf London and New York. It registered more performances in one year in London than any piece before or sirxe. Ri:r two years cifjht companies in I Great Britain and America, .-bowed with 'Runty.' One .-eone is taken from the historic kitchen of 'Jibbie Shields, near St. Mary's Loeh. where lbpg, the Ettrick Shepherd, and Sir Walter Scott were wont tu forgather. In this the pathetic, fide j of Kioteli character and the pawky humor \ are abundantly illustrated, ihe box piano | open at the RichC-h on Thursday, No-J vember 5. I

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141028.2.16

Bibliographic details

AMUSEMENTS, Issue 15635, 28 October 1914

Word Count
720

AMUSEMENTS Issue 15635, 28 October 1914

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