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A FATAL SCUFFLE

Mi: GKORGK PRALN KILLED. CHARGE OF MANSLAUGHTER, A ficumV in the bar of the Gladstone. Hotri last night ended fatally for Mr George Prain, a retired Custom-house official, who is well known to the cricketers ■•■ if l)uuedin as aji ex-president of the Itn-rtii<-s' Association, and an umpire of re-nie.M-ntittive experience. It appears that at about, 9.30 p.m., from information received, Se.rgea.nt. Matthews and Constable Parkin! I proc-ec-ded to the Gladstone Hotel, where t'hev Mere informed that a. man nr.infd Prain wart dead. Mr John Collins (the licensee) stated that deceased had fallen on. the back of his head in the bar, and that Dr Church had been sent for. When the latter arrived he pronounced life to bo extinct. There appear? to have been an argument hot ween Prain nnd a young man named Ernest Dallas, as the outcome of which deceased fell on the floor, death resulting from a broken bloocl-vecsel. Dallas, an Englishman, who bae been working in the country districts of Ot.aj»o, reported himself at the Police .Station this inomiri!.'. and was arrested on a- charge of manslaughter. , Prain was a- widower, between 5*. and oo veil's of aae, and prior to his i-etirement on superannuatum a rear ago was chief clerk in the Customs. One of his elder souk is serving with the Expeditionary Force; two are following farming pursuits, and there are two children at home between the ages of 14 and 16 years. He .lived in Bruce street, Roidyn. INQUEST OPENED. The inquest was held at the niorguo this atternoon before Mr C. C. Graham (coroner), and in the presence of Dallas (in custody). Chief-detective Herbert represented the nohce. James Thus. Prain, grain broker, of Inverci.iuill, a brother of deceased, identified the body. He was afraid his brother was occasionally given to drinking in excess, but it was not a habit.' Dr Church stated that at about 9 p.m. he was called to the Gladstone Hotel in Maclaggan street, and found deceased lviiis 'in a room. He was quite dead. Exti'i'iial examination revealed a bruise on the face, which, however, was an old mark. There was no other mark. He had held a post mortem examination, and had found "the body well nourished, all the internal organs healthy, with the exception of a slitrht enlargement of the heart. On opening the skull, the cause of death was immediately seen. The surface of the brain discovered extensive meningeal hemorrhage, caused by the rupture of ii bloodvessel in the membranes of the brain. Hisrh blond pressure would cause such a rupture, particularly when blood vessels were in a state of degeneration. He would expect the bloodvessels to be more, or less in such state at deceased's age; and if he were given to any excess in' liquor this would give a tendency to nipt tiro of a bloodvessel wherever the tension of the blood exceeded any given point. Excitement, for example. He did not think a fall would do it. Chief-detective Herbert : You do not think a fall would bring about the result von found in the brain. Dr Church : The fall is more likely to lie the result of the hemorrhage. Von know the history of the rasp?--1 heard he had some exciting t;.lk with someone in the bar. I did ask if he had been struck on the head, and Mr Collins said that the man he had been talking with had fli'-ked him over the nose (with his finger|. Would the ordinary excitement of his argument cause the' condition.?— Almost any ev.itcntent. 1 do not think if wa& 'he result of a blow at ail. 'Mitlht we say that his death did. not result directly or indirectly from a biow ? Yes: yon mi'.'ii- say that. The inquest »'.*< proceeding at 3 p.m.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141027.2.30

Bibliographic details

A FATAL SCUFFLE, Issue 15634, 27 October 1914

Word Count
631

A FATAL SCUFFLE Issue 15634, 27 October 1914

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