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AMUSEMENTS

HAYWARDS' PICTURES. It was truly a holiday audience who assembled at the Octagon Theatre last night, when a most interesting programme of pictures was screened. The star picture is entitled 'The Life of General Villa, - and depicts a number of scenes from the recent Mexican revolt and stirring episodes in the tragic life of General Villa. Years ago Pancho Villa was a young rancher living alone with his two sisters, one of whom was a cripple. The younger sister was forcibly abducted by an officer in the Federal Army, and ruined. Tho other sister became demented as the result of this tragedy, and was ultimately found dead on her sister's grave. Villa then vowed warfare on all mankind :n revenge, for tho cruel wrong done to his sister, and became a bandit. He, with a small body of bandits, met and defeated other bandits, and ultimately was chosen chief of a great band of revolutionists, and became the terror of the northern part of Mexico. As is now common history, he met and defeated every Federal army that was sent against him, captured town after town, and city after city. He ultimately succeeded in killing with his own hands upon the battlefield the officer who had assisted in the abduction and ruin of his sister. The Federals were defeated, and Villa, who once was an outlaw with a price npon his head, was finally proclaimed president of the great Republic of Mexico. A number of scenes of the Battle of Torreon were shown, which were well filmed and perfectly screened. The ' American Graphic ' is, of course, strictly military, and depicts war heroes and other notables, including Lord Kitchoner, the King of the Belgians, and the Tsar. Some good pictures of British and German Dreadnoughts are also shown, and also some magnificent films of British recruits training preparatory to going to the front. 'A Halt in the Jungle' (scenic) is a beautiful picture, and there are also some good comics which complete a programme of more than average merit. The same programme will be repeated this evening.

FULLERS' PICTURES

During the last few weeks the King's Theatre has been riding upon a big wave of public favor, and last night, when a new series of pictures were submitted, it reached tidal proportions, the theatre being packed to the point of _ overflow more than once. Pride of place in a really excellent bill of fare, so to speak, was won by the latest edition of the ' Pathe War Gazette,' which, despite the restrictions placed upon the cinematographer, furnished almost a dozen snaps. The mobilisation of the Servians, Turcos, and the fighting Zouaves marching off to embark, gay with their miniature tricolors fluttering from the rifle barrels, drew prolonged bursts of applause from the audience, while the pictures of our own Khaki "Tommies" at Aldershot, and those showing a Japanese warship outside Kiao-Chau harbor were signals for enthusiastic demonstrations. But there was one picture which commanded almost reverend silence—the funeral of that brilliant scientific soldier, Sir J. Grierson, the slow moving lines of detachments from famous fighting regiments with arms reversed making an impressive sight. Outside of this budget of news, as it might be called, the headline attraction is furnished by a splendid comedy entitled ' Asta Neilson tip to her Tricks.' Two families make bold attempts to secure the affection of a millionaire, and, as may be readily conceived, there are many highly amusing situations. Asta Neilson scores heavily as a schoolgirl; in fact, for originality she would be a decided acquisition to any band of suffragettes. Tho film is a lengthy one, but the comedy is well maintained by a really splendid company of actors, and, moreover, the staging is on a most elaborate scale. Another excellent picture is ' A Momentous Decision,' which provides a tensely dramatic finish. It is one of Lubin's best releases. The other supports include a really fine scenic showing some charming views of the Hawkesbury River. QUEEN'S THEATRE. 'Orders Under Seal,' a stirring war drama, which can hardly fail to be of interest at the present time, is the chief item at tho Queen's Theatre. Brimful of sensational incidents, it rouses the onlooker to a high pitch of excitement, and keeps him on the tin-toe of expectation till the final scene. The same programme will be shown at the Queen's again tonight. PLAZA PICTURES. ' Sons of the Sen,' a fine film showing views of our Navy—and particularly appropriate at the present time—Jieael.s the current programme at the Plaza- Pictures in George street. ' Texas Mill's Last Ride' ' A Race, for Life.' ar.d ' Eclair Journal' are a few of the supporting subjects. The same programme will be shown again to-night. LEROY, TALMA, AND BOSCO. The last performance of the Dunodin .season by these highly-gifted mysteryworkers and their assistants was given at His Majesty's Theatre last night in the presence of a large audience. The programme was the same as on the previous evenings. Mr Leroy and his colleagues are faithful, and above the trick of cutting things short- on a last night.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141027.2.16

Bibliographic details

AMUSEMENTS, Evening Star, Issue 15634, 27 October 1914

Word Count
845

AMUSEMENTS Evening Star, Issue 15634, 27 October 1914

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