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FOOTLIGHT FLASHES

[By Loitebeb.] It is rumored —and the rumor has a substantial substratum of credibility—that Fuller Brennan will reopen vaudeville at the Princess Theatre in a few weeks. _ In the writers opinion it was a tactical blunder to close. Dunedin has earned (mind, literally earned) the reputation of being one of the worst show towns in Australasia, but at the same time any manager who travels this country knows that, taken at the flood of some particular tide of favor, Dunedin has beaten the best in New Zealand. Some years ago; according to the word of a manager, there was more money in His Majesty’s Theatre on one night' than tho company referred to took in any other town in New Zealand: and certainly the Daisy Jerome season should have convinced the Fuller-Brennan management that there was more than a week’s profitable business in the little lady. She mav have shown better box office returns further north, but against that is the face that there she was supported by two acts which almost challenged her supremacy on the bill—the Hartley Wonders and Morrill and his Yip-Yaps. They never came thus far south.

Our old friend “Barry” Waters, now general manager for Fuller-Brennan in West Australia, forwards his programme for the week which commenced on Saturday, October 3, His big acts were Sebastian Merrill and his Yip-Yaps, and Fred. Swift, (the Musical Nut), Daisy Jerome, and Leonard Nelson are due shortly. Fatima, a Turkish harem dancer, is scoring high praise in Sydney at present. A correspondent writes to a Northern paper; Graceful and exquisitely shaped. Fatima dances like nobody else who has appeared upon tho Australian stage. Her work is purely 'Oriental, and shows whence came the inspiration for Maud Allan's graceful posing. But there is more meaning. more movement, more life in Fatima’s dancing. Though beautifully modelled, she is marvellously loose, and possesses remarkable muscle control. Part of her dance, indeed, consists of rhythmic working of the muscles of the hips, hack, and chest. Anyone but a real artist might easily make this part of the dance grotesque and repulsive. With Fatima it is all part of the rhythmic scheme, into which .it fits artistically with never a jar. Mr Lewis Willoughby, a young English actor now playing with Nellie Stewart in ‘ Du Barry,’ has been associated with such eminent actors as Martin Harvey and Forbes Robertson. Last year ho played in the London production of Rex Beach's ‘The Barrier,’ with Mathew Lang and Hareourt Beatty. In the Australian production, staged at Melbourne, last Saturday, Arthur Styar played the part of the bad man Dan Stark, Reginald Wykoham played John Gale, and Beatrice Day appeared as Necia. tho girl of the North. Margaret Anglin will “ try out ” this season an American play, ‘The Divine Friend,’ written by Cha-s. Phillips, a ’Frisco newspaper man. The American drama ‘Within the Law’ is still a big drawing card in tho States. No less than three companies will present it this season. It is also announced that no fewer than seven companies will go on tour in America with ‘ Potash and Pearlmutter,’ a play secured by .1. C. Williamson, tLd., for production in Australasia. The ‘Australasian.’ commenting upon the Julius Knight revival of ‘The Silver King' (by the way., the list of dates seems to show that Dunedin is to bo cut out of the New Zealand tour), says that Knight, makes a very good Wilfred Denver to those who are not prejudiced by old associations. But it adds: “To those who saw that first production there never has been, never can he, any other cast. Neither in Australia, nor. we believe, outside it has a melodrama been so lavishly, so incomparably manned. Apart from I tho principals—Titheradge, Annio Mayor, Garner, Blanche .Stammers. Phi! Day, I Redwood—there were men of the highest eminence playing minor, almost, trifling, parts, men like William Hoskins, tutor and mentor of the great Sir Henry Irving. ‘The Silver King’ very nearly became the property of the late George 'Rignold, who in his day specialised in picturesque melodrama, which his rivals rarely touched. Rignold being advised by cable that it was a rare opportunity, decided to buy it, but meantime his old rival and friend, ,T. C. Williamson, secured the second great prize of his theatrical life—the first being, of course, ‘ Struck Oil.’ ’’ “ Whenever I feel inclined to grumble at my lot as an actor.” said C. H. Workman, the comedian of ‘The Girl in the Taxi,’ soon to be seen at Melbourne Her Majesty’s, “ I force upon myself tho reflexion that [ might be much worse off as a manager. I went into management at the London Savoy, and produced three musical plays—‘Fallen Fairies.’ ‘Tho Mountaineers,’ and ‘ Two Merry Monarchy ’ They left the treasury nearly £IO,OOO on "the wrong side. Getting a success is a costly business in London.”

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141024.2.87

Bibliographic details

FOOTLIGHT FLASHES, Evening Star, Issue 15632, 24 October 1914

Word Count
810

FOOTLIGHT FLASHES Evening Star, Issue 15632, 24 October 1914

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