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THE LICENSING ISSUE

DISCUSSED BY ANGLICAN SYNOD. [Special to the Stah.] AUCKLAND, October 22. No decision was arrived at by tho Anglican Diocesan Synod after a protracted discussion upon the Prohibition issue, which was raised in the following resolution moved by the Rev. C. A. B. Watson:— That this synod earnestly reaffirm their resolution of 1908 urging the church people ot the diocese.to support No-license at the coining poll, and now that this issue and the larger one of National Prohibition are > before, the electors, urge the church people of the diocese to support both issues, being convinced that in so doing they will render inestimable service to the Empire, especially at this time of national crisis.

IThs mover quoted a number c,f authorities in support of the contention that alcohol ill even tnoderato- quantities was subversive of the efficiency of soldiers and sailors, and further referred to Lord Kitchener's message to the army, in which he urged all ranks to abstain from intoxicants. He did not pretend thatUtopian conditions would result from the adoption of Prohibition, but Prohibition Tvas going to make it vastly easier for the workers in all sections of social reform to solve many pressing problems. He did not go so far ns to say that Prohibition was a perfect remedy for tho drink evil. The Rev. A. H. Colvillo deprecated the introduction lit the present time of a motion of a distinctly provocative character, calculated to arouse a passionate resentment in many who conscientiously objected to what they considered an intolerable tyranny. Prohibitionists apparently failed to recognise that the opponents of Prohibition were not all personally interested in the business. The '- Moderates" were lumped together and labelled "The Liquor Party." The 1908 resolution had aroused freat resentment in many churchmen, and ad he then been a layman and one of the unregenerate he would have felt :n----clined to shake his list in the face of anyone who attempted to dictate to bin; in that way. (Laughter.) He deprecated the use of patriotic feeling at the present time for the purpose of the motion, for he felt that if Prohibition were carried when the minds of the people were concentrated elsewhere it would be long resented. He was glad that a branch of the Moderate Leagne had been formed in Auckland, seeing that the league in their desire for reform stopped only at National Prohibition. 'The latter" might suit a people like the Germans, though no one had ever tried to take the German's mug of beer away from him. but Englishmen were not ready to submit to vexatious irritation and unnecessary prohibition. The Rev. E. Chitty objected to the passage of a resolution" influencing churchmen in respect to their vote. The Rev. W. C. Wood gave a number of reminiscences of Invercargill under Nolicense, and stated that bis experience there had convinced him of the complete efficiency of the system. The guillotine was applied without a vote on the question being taken.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141023.2.10

Bibliographic details

THE LICENSING ISSUE, Evening Star, Issue 15631, 23 October 1914

Word Count
497

THE LICENSING ISSUE Evening Star, Issue 15631, 23 October 1914

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