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LATEST FROM EUROPE.

Germany is said to have sent Turkey a million sterling in gold and heavy consignments of guns. Austria also is said to be sending men to Constantinople.

Germany has supplied a longfelt want. She has organised a Truth Association, The Information thus given includes the capture of King George V. by Zeppelin airships and his ransom for £5,000,000 (gold). Reuter advises that Turkey has refused Britain's request to discharge the German members of the crows on the Coeben and Breslau.

Ceneraf French reports that the troops under his command fought from August 23 to September 17 without a single day's halt or rest. Anti-German demonstrations and rioting continue in England.

The Japanese cruiser Takachiho was sunk by a mine in Kiao-chau Bay. Only 10 men were saved.

ANOTHER CHAPTER OF THE HISTORY.

DETAILS OF BRITISH OPF.RATIONS

The Prime Minister has received the following cable from the High Oommisfioner:

LONDON, October 16.

Official: Sir John French forwards two lengfhy despatches, dated September 17 and October 3. giving details of the pioof ilic British operations. The following rive the main point*: August 28.—General Chetwodc, with the stli "Cavalry Brigade, encountered the eastern German eohrr.n near Ceri/.y, moving youth. The brigade attacked and voided the column. The leading German regiment- sirft'-eicd very .severely, being almost broken up. August 29.—The British retired to a position a few miles north of the line Compie.me to Soisson;-. The light Hank of the Germans now reached a point which appeared to seriously endanger my line of communications with Havre. ] had aheadv evacuated Amiens. Orders were given 'to change t!io base to St. Xa/.aire p.lid establish an advance base at T.e Mane. This operation was well carried out. In spite iii' Iho severe i<treat, losses were inriietrd upon the. Guard Tenth Corps and Guard Tiefeivo Corps of the German army. It was not part of Geneial Joffre'e )>laii to nuisue- this ad--anfage to tlie line of the Manic September 3.—When letiring from the wooded country to the south of Compiegne the" Ist Cavalry Brigade were oveitaken by the Geiiuau c'avalrv. They momentarily lost the hor.-e artillery battery, and several officers and men were killed and wounded.. With the help of detachments from the I'hiid Corps, operating on their left, they not onlv recovered their own guns, but fticceede'd in capturing 12 of the enemy's guns. Theie was a severe rearuitard action at Villers CotfereK in which the 4th Guards Brigade suffered considerably. The enemy had thrown over bridges and crossed the Manic in considerable force, which was-threatening the Allies all along the line.

| September s.—The French Ccnimaudei- ! in-Chief informed me of his intention to • take the offensive forthwith, and he rej quested me to effect a change of front to Imv right, my left resting on the Marne, ; my right on the Fifth Army to fill the gap • be'tweeu that army and the Sixth. I was to advance a»aiufit the enemy in front, and ' join in the 'general offensive movement. These combined movements commenced I on September 6. at sunrise, and concluded : on the evening of September 10. by which ! time the Germans were driven back to the line Soisr-ons-Bheims, with the loss of thou- ; sands of prisoners, many guns, and elioi- '. mous masses of transport. About the 3rd September the enemy j appeared to have changed his.plans, and it ; was determined to stop his advance south I direct upon Paris. 1 should conceive it ] to be about noon on the 6th .September. ; alter the British had changed their front to the right and occupied the line Jouy-le- , Chatel -Furlmouuere-Villicieuve - le - Coote, 1 because it was apparent l hut the enemy reali.-ed that a powerful threat was being made again--! his Hank, that his columns : started linn iug south-east, and began to beat the reiivat which opened the battle jon the 7th September. Both the sl:i and 6th French Armies were heavily engaged |on our flank. The Germans on the Onrcq i vigorously opposed the advance oi the I Fi'euch towards that river. The French ; threw the enemy back to the Petit -Mm in ! Hivcr after inflicting severe losses, especi alb- /d.oot Monleeaux. which was carried

at the point of the bayunei. The cnemy Jetreated before our advance, covered by his Sec;,nd—i.e.. 9th-and Guard Cavalry Divisions, which suffered severely. Our cavalrv acied vith ju'reat viyor. ospechllv General 1).- Lisle'.- U:icr K b. uilh the 9th Lancers and the l?;h ilu-oars. 6>h S-ptei!iber.--T!f 2nd Aimy Corps encountered considerable oppo.- Itioii. but. diovo. back the enemy at all points \\U'n del cat. loss, and makiii;; con.-hlei aide ciittires. The old Army Coips drove back cmisideral" 1 " bodies of the enemy's inf.uit'v. ,\r.:\ made captures. 'j:h September. - I he .Ist nod 2ml Aimy Croi> forded the pa soar;,' of the Maine Dining the day's pursuit tic enemy suf-.-■ur hand... A k.fteiy of machine guns was captured by the Second DiviTbe light ii g in the neighhorho-sl of Moutmirail was very ,-evere. 'I hi; teen guns, seven machine guns. 2.C00 pr:-oners. and quantities of transport fell into our hands. The enemv left manv dead on the field.

Although T deeply rcgi et to report our heavy losses in killed and wounded. I do not think they have been excessive in view of the magnitude of the great light. and ihe demoralising loss in killed and. wounded known to have been caused to the enemy by the vigor and severity of the pursuit From August 25 to September 17. from the Mons- bank to the Seine, and from the Seme to the Aisue. the army under my command was ceaselessly engaged without one single day's halt or rest of any kind. I TURKEY. BKVIANT. Prejs Association—By Telegraph—Copyright. LONDON. October 19. (Received October 20. at 2.5 p.m.) Renter states that, replying to British representations. Turkey icfused to discharge the Germans from the Guehen and 13 re sin u. JAPANESE CRUISER SUNK. TOKIO, October 19. (Received October 20. at 2.50 p.m.) • The Japanese eurispr Takachiho wastsunk by a mine in Kiao-chau Hay. Ten men were saved. [The Takachiho was built in 1885; length, 300 ft ; beam. 46ft.; draught, 20ft; displacement, 5.700 tons; complement, 357. She eatried eight 6iu guns.J MORE CANADIANS. LONDON, October 19. (Received October 20, at 2.50 p.m.) Many Canadian troops landed at Avonmouth on Sunday. Their arrival was only known when they marched through the streets. (Received October 20, at 2.50 p.m.) Mr Borden states that the Government will keep 30,000 volunteers continually in training. ITALIANS IN TRIKBTK. ROME. October 19. (Received October 20, at 2.50 p.m.) A message from Trieste declares that

60,000 Italians who were ex* empted on medical grounds have beeh ordered to undergo a fresh iue<iica r I etaniination.

MORE BRITISH LENIENCY.

MOB ATTACK GERMAN TRADERS.

LONDON, October 19. (Received October 20, at 2.50 p.m.)

The 'Manchester Guardian' states as an amazing fact that our cruisers are not arresting German reservists who are neutrals. This apparently is due to the British acceptance of a certain interpretation of a phrase in the Declaration of London, namely: " Individuals embodied in an armed force of the enemy."

A mob again attacked German shops in Deptford on Sunday. They raided and ignited a corn dealer's shop. Several of the mob wore injured in a conflict with the p.olice. The crowd smashed a town councillor's windows at Saffron Walden. They alleged that he was harboring two Germans. The latter escaped.

OTACO'S REINFORCEMENTS.

LEAVE FOR TRENTHAM

There was a large crowd on the railway platform this morning, when the first express left, to witness the departure of the Duncdiu section of Otago's quota of the first reinforcements of the main Expeditionarv Force,

The second express brought the South Otago and Invercargill section, these being in charge of Sergeant-major Wright. The men were loudly cheered when the train steamed out of the station, and responded with the singing of ' It's a Long, Long Way to Tipperary.' FROM PORT CHALMERS. Seventeen young men, mostly Territorials joined the first express this morning at Port Chalmers. They were a healthylooking lot of young 'fellows, and the number of footballers amongst them was noticeable. Off to the war! They were aecoided a hearty little send -off, the Mayor and quite a. t umber of residents of the Port being present at, the railway station for that purpose. -.Success and a safe j etui v " was the parting word to the soldiers, and as the train moved off amidst cheers and the waving of handkerchiefs the school band (in charge, of MiMt. *• Booth, the rector) played merrily Its a Long Way to Tipperary.'

OVERSEAS CLUB. The increasing activity displayed at the Overseas Club 'depot, in the New Zealand Express Company's Buildings, n i a «ure indication that the efforts of the ladies responsible for the substantial augmentation of the British and Belgian Belief Fund is being appreciated. Ihe response to the appeal to contribute to this deserving object is most gratifying. The following additional donations are grateftillv acknowledged :—' Mater, five large parcels of clothing; Mrs Cuthbert, baby's clothing and 2s cash; Mrs Braithwaite third donation of clothing; Mr John M'Rae, £5: Mrs W. D. Heenan, large parcel children's clothing; Mrs Smith, clothing; Mrs H. F. Bastings, Elm row, £1; Mrs A. Clark, parcel of clothing ; Mrs Kearns, Messrs R. Scott and Co Mrs M'Dermott "(fourth donation), Mrs Saul, collected by Mrs P. D. Garside (Ros'lyn), £2 14s: Molhsons, Ltd., large donation of samples; Messrs Herbert. Haynes. and Co., large parcel for " Red Cross Fund '"; " Sympathiser, new goods; Mrs Martin, goods; the Misses Watkins, handsome donation of children s woollen comforts; Mrs H. F. Bastings (Elm row), children's Christmas box; " S K ," five maids' new coats for Christmas box; F.E.V. and F. M'U., £2 2s 6d for Christmas box; Master Freddie Henderson, condensed milk far Christmas box: Master Denis Barnett, large parcel story books: Mrs. J. C. M'George, six large hexes of children's Christmas stockings for Christmas box. Splendid arrangements have been made for to-morrow afternoon's display of Christmas box gifts, and it is confidently anticipated that the bulk of gifts for the juvenile war waifs will be considerably augmented as the result. The Forbury School Band and children have undertaken to furnish an attractive, musical programme. On Friday donations in aid of the lied Cross Flint! will be received. Gifts of khaki and extra width flannelette will be specially acceptable. The, gifts, which .should 'be specially marked "Red Cross Fund." will he packed and handed over to Mr J. E. Hone, secretary and treasurer of St. John Ambulance Association. C,\VERSHAM BRANCH. The ladies connecter! with the Caversham branch of the Overseas Club still continue to work in the interests of the British and Belgian Reh'ef Fund. The following additional donations are. gratefully arkno vlcrlged :■—Mesdamcs Glass, ('minor. Lindon. Brandon, B. Tggo, Cooke (■•ccond donation!, and Hinton. parcels of clothing: " Anouviivius," large sack of clothing: " Anonymous" parcel of clothing :' Miss Glass.'new material and furs; Mr-:., 1-inda Guest, clothing; Mrs Allen, new Hannel and story books; '• Anonyi'v,is." new shirt", flannels, and storv b.,-01-. t . \. KITCHENER AND FP.ENCn. London ' Truth ' ha> the followign intcr-e-tirg notes on the heads of the Army:-- '* '' " I understand that one proposal which mi- made in the Cabinet was to appoint Lord Kitchener a- Commander-in-Chitt of the Expeditionary Force, with Sir John French as his Chic! of Staff: but the proposal was negatived, and rightly so. for there i, more room for Lord Kitchener's talent-, in than out of doors. As an organiser lie lias no rival among either military men or civilians, and he goes to the War Otliee with a. plenitude of public confidence which would not have been extended at the present moment to any other individual. " sir John French, on the contrary, is a lighter rather than an administrator, and has fallen naturally and ea-ily into his place as head of the Expeditionary Force. Though the Boer War did not give many chances: to English generals. Sir John never threiv one away. Hi- instinct was to do the right thing at the right time and in the right way. He got out of Ladysmith only a t'e'w hours before the town was beleaguered, and then went to Colesberg to play the game of bluff which made the"Boers believe they were being opposed by the whole of Lord Roberts"* army instead of by a handful of horsemen and a couple of ho.se artillery guns. General French's great asset as a commander is his self-control when under lire. Kven Lord Roberts cannot compete with him in this respect. Nothing ever ruffles lu\ temper or disturb* his imperturbability. At Klip Drift, when he called up his brigadiers to give them orders about the, famous charge through the. Boer lines, lie was as i)iu'et and composed as if he was faking charge of a field day in the Long Valley at Aldeishot. No matter what happens, he will keep his head cool and his brain clear, and make the most of the men under hi.- command.

'• Major-general Sir Archibald Murray, tlifi Chief of the Stalf in the Expeditionary Force, is a man after Sir John French's hei.it, a veritable Heilhier. <iniet. selfj>os>esscd. determined, thoroughly nji to date as regards professional knowledge, and a tremendously hard weaker. He went out to South '.Africa on »he Staff in 1899. and has been on the .Stall' ever since. As Director of Military Trr'ning at the War Office from 1907 to 191% he gave an enonnous impetus to the training of the Army, and will bring an accumulation of valuable experience to beai' on the duties with which he has been entrusted."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141020.2.42

Bibliographic details

LATEST FROM EUROPE., Issue 15628, 20 October 1914

Word Count
2,262

LATEST FROM EUROPE. Issue 15628, 20 October 1914

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