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PATRIOTIC AND WELFARE ASSOCIATION.

Mr P. P. Sargood, in the absence of His Worship the Mayor, presided over a wellattended meeting of the executive of the Patriotic and General Welfare Association, held this morning. A deputation from the Employment Committee referred to several matters, including the extension of Leith wall, which i», however, dealt with elsewhere. Mr J. Loudon said that the question of afforestation on the City reserves had been gone into, and it was practically certain that the scheme would be approved by the City Council, in which case another 30 men would bo provided for. These works would not absorb all the men out of employment, only some 160 out of over 400, and if no further outlet was obtainable it might be necessary to split the work up, each batch of men working alternate fortnights. Mr Solomon said the great difficulty was to get suitable work to spend their money on. The committee had had £3,000 allocated to them by the executive, and a further £1,500 for the esplanade if that j scheme was adopted, but useful work was j difficult to arrange for. No doubt the i whole £7,000 spoken of would be needed 1 to relieve the distress which unquesiioni ably existed in Dunedin. A letter was received from Mr J. Stroud submitting a scheme for raising money for the fund, and was referred to the Finance I Committee for consideration. .

The Expeditionary Committee’s report stated that a telegram had been received from the Mayor of Auckland to the effect that £IOO worth of goods was being sent by the Auckland Patriotic Committee for the- use of the Auckland members of the Samoan contingent, and asking whether Otago would act similarly for the men from that province.—lt was resolved - that the matter of providing the sum of £1 per man for the Otago members of the contingent in Samoa bo referred to the Expeditionary Committee for a report. The Employment and Relief Committee recommended that the Dunedin Citizens’ Garden Fete Society be advised that the oommittoa will subsidise the £SO available from the society to be epem. on improvements and work at the fcouthern Oval; they repotted that 54 applications for relief had been considered, and relief amounting to £B6 9s 6d granted, and tons of the coal donated to the committee had been distributed; that the committee had offered the Waikouaiti County Council to contribute £l6O towards the cost of repairing the Leith Vailey-Wai-tati road, the estimated cost of which is £6OO, and the Dunedin City Council was prepared to contribute £l5O, the Waikouaiti County Council to be advised to apply to the Government for a grant for the other £3OO required ; that the matter of the St. Kilda-bt. Clair esplanade was still under consideration; that 484 men had registered their names as being out of work, these men having about 1,000 dependents. Rev. F. G. Camming, in moving the adoption of the report, said that up to last week 110 had been employed, but this number had now been reduced to 50. So far as the Employment and Relief Committee were concerned, we were now up against a very stiff proposition. He did not share in the opinion expressed bv the deputation. (Hear, hear, and applause.) The work at Chisholm Park had been stopped owing to horse and scoop work being necessary. It had been hoped bo do something at- Mornington, but so far nothing had been done. Owing to these circumstances he pleaded for the adoption of the report. Seconded by Rev. Mr Diamond. The report, as amended by the referring back of a clause relating to the walling of a portion of the Leith Stream near the University, was adopted.

QUEEN MARY FUND. In acknowledging the receipt of a further lot of gifts of socks, cholera belts, etc., for the Queen Mary Fund, Lady Liverpool states that gifts previously acknowledged were despatched to London on the 16th inst. As Her Excellency ha* been definitely advised by telegram that only socks anil woven cholera belts are required in connection with the above appeal, she desires it to be known that she proposes to devote all other articles which have been received to the use of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force and its reinforcements. GENERAL. The South Dunedin Baptist Young Men’s Bible Class forward us £2 7 s 9d in aid of the Belgium fund. “ Tahuna Car” sends us 2s 3d for the Belgian relief fund. Mr R. W. Hall, of Musselburgh, sends us another contribution (£1 Is) for the local distress fund. The money is the proceeds from eggs laid by his utility fowls. THE CENSOR AT WORK. The work of the censor is described in ft letter Mr P. M'Callum, of Edgewaie road, Christchurch, has received from his son in Edinburgh. It states that a lady friend of tho writer had gone to the front as a nurse, and had sent him a com munication. This was written on a formal, official card, and after the oensoi bad been a,t work read as follows :—“ 1 am quite well. I am sick, wounded, in hospital. I received your parcel, letters, message. I have received no letter fron. you fur a long time.” The letter alar states that the wife of a French soldiet at the front received a letter, addressed in her husband’s bandwriting. Inside, however, it contained the following words, in an unknown hand:—‘‘Madam, —Your husband is quite well, but he is too communicative.” Evidently the French censor retained the letter, but had politely rent a message to the soldier’s wife to relieve her anxiety. A SENSATIONAL EXPERIENCE. The steamer Tofua, which recently arrived at Svdney from the Islands, met the email Island steamer Dawn at Apia, and those on board the latter vessel reported a sensational experience which befell them shortly before arriving there. The Dawn, which is a British-owned vessel, was mak ing for Apia shortly after the visit to the port of the Gorman warships (incise nau and Scbarnhorst. She was just to the north of the Samoan Group one dark night, and was running with all lights out to avoid being picked up by the enemy's ships. Suddenly the officer in charge noticed a light flashing off the port how, and as soon as it stopped another licht broke the darkness of the starboard bow with a series of flashes. The flashes were coming from the mastheads of two warships, which were conversing with each other in an unknown code. The two warships were coning straight the Dawn, and, like her, had all lights screened. There was not time to change the course- without running a big risk of Jxdng cut down. Tho officer on the bridge accordingly kept a smart lookout for the positions of the flashes ahead, and, with not a ray of light escaping from any part of his vessel, steered the Dawn straight for the dark space between the two signal lights. Tn this manner ho passed unseen between the two warships.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141019.2.50.4

Bibliographic details

PATRIOTIC AND WELFARE ASSOCIATION., Evening Star, Issue 15627, 19 October 1914

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1,170

PATRIOTIC AND WELFARE ASSOCIATION. Evening Star, Issue 15627, 19 October 1914

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