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LATEST FROM EUROPE.

Captain Fox, of the lost Amphion, was in command of the Undaunted, which helped to sink four German destroyers off the Hatch coast. An extract from tho psskot book of a dead German soldier roads: ” This country [France] will be our grave.” Tens of thousands of Londoners met on Winfbledon Common yesterday, and, at the instance of Mr T. P. O’Connor, M.P., lifted their hands and vowed never to sheathe tho sword until Belgium Is free. ‘ The Times’s ‘ military correspondent, answering German allegations, says that there are 1,200,000 men organised for war in Britain at tho present time, and that they are of a higher standard than any now existing In Europe. ‘ The Times ’ says editorially that Ostend is of no importance. From the standpoint of war It Is not worth a second thought. Sir Valentine chirol’s exposure of German intrigues respecting the Monroe Doctrine has aroused intense anger in America.

TWENTY-ONE OF THE HAWKE'S MEN SAVED OX A RAPT. WELLINGTON, October 17. Received by the Prime Minister; London, October 16, 8.50 p.m..—Official : The lieutenant-commander and 20 men of the warship Hawke were saved from a raft. DUTCH STEAMER CAPTURED. PARIS, October 18. (Received October 19, at 11.50 a.m.) A French destroyer off Marseilles captured tbo Dutch cargo steamer Konigtn Emma, bound from Batavia to Hamburg. ALGERIAN SHARPSHOOTERS. LEAVE ONLY ONE IN A HUNDRED. PARIS, October 18. (Received October 19, at 11 .55 a.m.) The .French for several days made unsuccessful attempts to dislodge 800 Germans, who were hidden in a cave at Sois6ons. Eventually 1,200 Algerian sharpshooters, with bayonets between their teeth, crawled to’the trenches at night and burled themselves «n the Germans. Only eight escaped alive. NO “BEG PARDONS” IN BERLIN. BERLIN, October 18. (Received October 19, at 11.50 a.m.) The police arrested the British Relief Committee, who were working at the British Consulate under the surveillance of the American Embassy. JAPAN’S UNDERTAKING. REPORTED SANCTION TO CAPITULATION OF TSING-TAO. PEKING, October 18. (Received October 19, at 2 p.m.) The German Charge d’Affaires has received from Berlin a long cipher cable, which is believed to sanction the capitulation of Tsing-tao under certain conditions. The Germans have initiated a violent anti-Japanese propaganda, at Now-chwang with a" view of causing hostility within Manchuria. AUSTRALIAN ITEMS. MELBOURNE, October 19. (Received October 19, at 11 a.m.) The military authorities propose establishing a new 'force for the. tropics. Volunteers under 50 with previous military experience arc invited, but the period of service is not necessarily till the end of the war.

The State Prem’ors are requested to meet early in November to discuss matters of finance It is anticipated that the amount necessary to maintain the public works for the year approach £20,0CX),000. The Prime 3linister of the Commonwealth states that the note, issue will b(3 mainly used for finance in the States. Increased taxation is not contemplated; but it will come later on, when the position is more dearly defined.

A MESSAGE FROM SAMOA. THE SICK LIST. WELLINGTON, October 19. The Governor has received the following communication from the Administrator of Samoa:—“ The general health of the troops is good. Tixs following is the sick list: Appendicitis, Major Beore (recovered); pneumonia, Borackott; Dysentery—Corporals Tangey and Collier (Railway Ku gineors), Paddington (6th Regiment), Privates Tsraall (Railway Engineers), {Stanley (Railway Engineers), Harnsby (3rd Regiment), Sergeant Anderson (Army Service Corps); fever Prevaile, Callingham (3rd Regiment). Allison, and Beer (Railway Engineers), Quayle (Army Service Corps). James (sth Regiment); rheumatism, Bra ugh ton (Railway Engineers). “ All are doing well except the pneumonia cafe.’’

ILLNESS AMONG TROOPERS. [Pee United Press Association.] WELLINGTON, October 19. Trooper Cecil Alexander, of Otago, died in Wellington Hospital on Saturday night from pneumonia contracted while he was in camp at Miramar. Ho was 28 years of age. Fifteen men from Auckland, who joined the Expeditionary Force. are being treated for measles in the Fever Hospital at Wellington. FURTHER SUCCESSES. AR MENTIEE ES R ETAKEN. PARIS, October IS. {Received October 19- at 1.40 p.m.) A Communique si ales that, the Belgians vigorously repulsed several attack's at crowing-places on the kscr River; also that wc have occupied the front of Givenchy dies and Fromcile and retaken Armentie'rcs, and appreciably advanced (o tliu north of Arras, and slightly progressed At certain points between Arras and the Oise. OVERSEAS CLUB. The, women workers connected with the Overseas Club are still working assiduously in the interests of the Belgian and British war waifs. Large quantities of goods continue to come to hand, and there are not wanting willing hands to assist in_ repairing and packing parcels of left-off clothlni’hc following additional donations have been received, and are gratefully acknowledged : —Mrs Mathews (clothing), Mrs Moss (girls’ new frocks). Overseas member (clothing), member 2s 6d, O.S.C. 6s, Miss Black (clothing), -Miss Mary Napier (a lovely Christmas box for little Belgians), Mrs Fraor, George street (a large parcel of .cloth and tweed), “ No Name ” and ‘‘79 Moray Place” (clothing), ‘Evening Star’ Company (wrapping paper). Complete preparations nave been made for Christmas Gift Day on Wednesday, and it is anticipated that there will be a large attendance of supporters and sympathisers at the club’s rooms (New Zealand Express Company’s buildings) on Wednesday, and that the Christmas box fund will be’materially assisted thereby. Any suitable gift (anything of a compact nature) will be gratefully received. The Forfaury School Band have decided to march to the Overseas depot at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, and will play selections. The other children connected with the school will also be in attendance, and a programme of vocal and instrumental items will be rendered between 4.15 and 6 p.m..

REMEMBER WEDNESDAY 1

FOUR GREAT MEETINGS. PATRIOTIC EMPLOYERS AT HOME. Every citizen should remember,' and keep as fast as he or she would an important business or social appointment, that ho or she is due on Wednesday afternoon at either the Octagon Hall, His Majesty’s Theatre, the Princess Theatre, or the Garrison Hall to swell by attendance the fund to assist the Belgian and British who have been reduced to destitution. It is fitting that Wednesday should be the day, for it is Trafalgar Day, and non© can fail to remember that just as Britain on the day of that epoch-making naval engagement struck the first of her two deadly blows at a brutal and despotic conqueror, so little Belgium a few weeks ago clung to the mailed fist of as brutal and despotic a conqueror, and made that first blow which was to have been fatal, impotent. The dreadful wound she suffered in that terrible encounter you are asked to salve.

But, indeed, there is no fear that Dunedin’s response will be worthy. As evidence of this the committee have alreadyhad intimation of what some of the citizens w-ill contribute to the fund on Wednesday. There are two unconditional promises of £IOO each, three more of £SO each, conditional upon a certain number of others donating a like amount, an unconditional promise of £lO 10s, and three of £5 5a each, as well as lesser sums. There w-as some discussion on the demonstrations at this morning’s meeting of the executive of tho Otago Patriotic and General Welfare Association. A letter was received from Miss Stewart (Ladies’ Committee) suggesting that instead of employees in factories forfeiting a half-day’s wages to attend, a collection might be taken up in the workrooms. Mr J. A, Johnstone, however, moved that the suggestion be disapproved. They must, ho said, impress upon every employer that he should give a half-holiday, and pay' wages. Mr Johnstone proceeded to relate an instance of patriotism at Home. One big biscuit firm, employing 14,000 girls, had lost ail their trade, since it had been largely Continental. Straightway they converted their factorv into a workroom for the manufacture oi: clothes for Belgians, and continued to pay their girls’ wages. The speaker thought that in this unparalleled crisis, when a' friendly country had been wiped out in our cause, every man and woman and child should slwnv their desire to help by attending the meetings and contributing. Mr C. Speight endorsed this view, remarking that while Dunedin had only £1,500 for the Belgian fund, Christchurch had sent nearly £15,000. If there could not be a big attendance of workers on Wednesday afternoon, it would be better to postpone tho meetings till evening. Mr Breen pointed out that if orjy 10 per cent, of the factory and shop hands attended, the halls would all he full. Mr Johnstone’s motion was carried.

In reply to a- wire from the Mayor to the Hon. H. D. Bell requesting that, where possible, Government departments ho given a half-holiday on Wednesday, the Minister replied that he had submitted the matter to' the Minister of Railways, and the Mayor has now telegraphed that gentleman urging the matter. WALLING LEITH STREAM. PROPOSED RELIEF WORK. _ The principal matter before the executive of the Patriotic and General Welfare Association this morning was the consideration of a report by a deputation to the* Works Committee of the City Council, which deputation obtained from the committee an agreement to recommend to the council to continue the work of walling the Leith. Stream from the University to Forth street, and lo reclaim and finish on both sides of (he wall, where necessary, at a, cost of £6,000, over £4.000 of which will be absorbed in labor; the Otago Patriotic and General Welfare Association to contribute one-third of the cost to a maximum of £2,000. This deputation consisted of Messrs J. Loudon, T. Somerville, and S. Solomon, representing the Employment, Committee of the association.

Mr 'Loudon explained that tho executive had already granted a sum for the work, and the University Council had subsidised this. The City Council, however, thought the wah, being a, desirable city work, should be extended to Forth street, and concrete Trail*? made along both sides of the stream. The council proposed to spend £4,000, and the deputation asked tho executive to allocate £2.000. This would absorb 25 men immediately, and afurther 40 in about a fortnight's time, and the work would hist six or teyen months. Mi M’Curdie submitted a’ plan of the proposed extended work, which he said included the removal of Tanna Hill. If the work were ranclioin’d, it. was intended to consult the Harbor Board, with a. view to continuing the wall between Forth street and Harbor ten arc. The Rev. F G. Gumming moved tho adoption of the proposals outlined above, and the Ivey. Mr Diamond seconded.

Mr HnzHfc opposed tho proposals as regarded the won; of walling Leilb. Stream. It eeemed to him that the proposal loft out portion between Harbor terrace and Forth street, which 'was badly flooded some time ago, and tho works* proposed might endanger tho works of the Harbor Hoard, and make tint body held'' for the Hood that might be caused. Mr G. Fenwick agreed that 5( would he foolish to donate this sum of £2.000 before being assured that it would ensure the completion of the work, and not interfere with the Harbor Board. He moved that the matter should be referred bark to tho committee, with a special view to their conferring with the Harbor Beard

and finding out if that body were willing to complete th',3 work. Mr E. C. llmdctt iccbnded the amendment.

Mr Gumming said thin meant blocking the matter for another week. They could not hope to get much sympathy from the Harbor Board. It was a great pi tv that this work should he bung up. At the end of the week time would not, be more than 50 men employed. Mr Breen accused the executive of placing obstacles in the way of the Employment and Relief Committee. lie felt strongly or. the point.

Mr G. K. Ritchie said the exoc«(.irft wore ached to sanction a large sum of money, which probably was in conflict with the scheme favored by Ihe Harbor Boaid. • ...

Mr Breen suggested that the city engineer be asked to give Lis opinion on this question. Mr Johnstone said be favored the amendment. It was only right and proper thatthe Harbor Board, ad one of the parties interested, shook! bo consulted. Mr Fenwick d-epivcaUd any suggestion that he or any other member of the executive was rl'K'iiig any obstacle in tuo aay of tlnT committee He personally disclaimed anv such feeling. The committee and the unemployed had the sympathy of every member ot the executive, but tha-t was no rcson why th-s executive of business men should be asked to commit themselves to a plan the end of which could not be ■foreseen. The executive did not even know whether the Harbor board were responsible for the continuation of the proposed work. It might be that the CHv Council had to carry it on. Why should tliis committee try to drive the executive to the commission, of an act which ns business men they thought to be impolitic and wrong? Mr Fenwick's amendment was carried.

Mr -W. Ibbotson, who leaves for Trentham to-morrow morning to prepare for taking his place at the front, was on Saturday last presented by his fellow-em-ployees on the staff of Messrs Chas. Begg and Co., Ltd., with a watch wristlet suitably inscribed. Mr R. Cook made the presentation, and expressed the hope that at the conclusion of the war Mr Ibbotson would return to Dunedin and to Begg’s safe and sound. The directors of the company, in addition to granting half-pay whilst on his country’s service and keeping his position open for him, presented Mr Ibbotson with a high-class safety razor. A Wanganui message states that 25 Maoris left Wanganui en route for Auckland to join the Native Expeditionary Force.

PATRIOTIC FUNDS. LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS REQUEST. Tile following letter has been forwarded by the executive of the Patriotic and General Welfare Association to the Eight Hon. the Prime Minister; copies have also been sent to the mayors of the following centres : —Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, Timaru, Oamaru, Gore, Invercargill, Greymouth, Palmerston North,' New Plymouth, Gisborne, Napier, Wanganui, Nelson, Westport, and Blenheim :

I have the honor by request of the Executive Committee of the Otago Patriotic and General Welfare Association to communicate with yon in reference to the various contributions in cash and other donations which have been received direct by the Government in connection with the despatch of the Expeditionary Forces. These contributions were the result of the appeal to tho people of the Dominion made by tire Government on the first notification of the war, in which the Empire had become involved, but subsequently the announcement made by yourself and your colleague, the Hon. the Minister of Defence, that the Dominion intended to bear the total costs of fully equipping the Expeditionary Forces, and maintaining them until their return to New Zealand, led to the belief that it was not tbe intention of tho Government to retain the donations of the people, but that in due time these would be banded to the bodies cotrolling the patriotic funds in tho respective districts. My committee fully endorse the view of the Minister of Defence and yourself that the entire cost of equipping, despatching, and maintaining the New Zealand farces should be borne by the public funds of. the Dominion. My committee fee! assured that if all funds, including tho value of donations, of horses, and of articles of equipment, outside of extra comforts in the way of clothing, etc., wore returned to the various district patriotic associations, those funds would be carefully and wisely administered with a full knowledge of local conditions and of the necessities of dependents of those who have patriotically enrolled themselves as soldiers of the Empire. It is almost certain that every shilling available will be required to meet tho demands on the fund that will arise in each district, and it. is all the more necessary that the various committees should have placed at their disposal the whole of the donations given iri their respective districts. My committee trust that you will give their request your careful and favorable consideration, so that the fund at their disposal may be sufficient to meet all likely demands upon it in the way of providing employment for those who have been thrown out of work as a result of the war, and also to secure for the dependents of those who have enrolled in the Expeditionary Force adequate provision for their present maintenance.— (Signed) J. B. Shaoklock, Mayor. Dunedin, October 15.

DUNEDIN WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION. The excellent work commenced by the Dunedin Women's Association is being actively pursued in the Early Settlers’ Hall, and that the interest is not merely local is demonstrated by the fact that donations are daily received from all parts of Otago. The last, donations are as follows :

Belgian and British Fund.—Miss Callender, Mr Aimer, Miss M‘Kay, Sargood, ■Son. and Even. “Anonymous,” Mrs Fitzgerald, Mrs Hicks, Miss Sinclair (Mosgielj, Mrs John Watt, Miss A. Forbes. Miss Joyce, Miss J. Lo. Fevre. Mrs R. W. Aitchesou (all of Hampden), Mr A. fck Orbell, Miss B. Collinson, (Misses MacKenzio (Dunrobin), Mr Hay, Moniington ladies. Miss Stevens. “Friend,” Misses Reid (Abbotsford), Miss Dow, “Anonymous.'’ Mrs Brown, Mrs M'Gregor, Miss W. Quinn and Miss Quinn (Tapanui), (Mrs Steadman, Miss Shand, and Mrs Sinclair (Lawrence).

Lady Liverpool Fund.—Mrs Lcedeen fMosgiel), (Mrs Connell, Mias Watt, and “ Anonymous.'’

Monetary Donations. —-British and Belgian fund: Hope Is, Mrsi Moss 2s. Mrs “R.” Is. Patriotic fund: Mrs lloldsworth.

A splendid donation was received this morning, the girls in Standard 111. at the Maori Hill School forwarding khakx„handkerchiefs hemmed by themselves for the reinforcements whkli will follow'thc main body of the Ksw Zealand Expeditionary Force. Perhaps now that a lead has been given, some of the girls at the other schools will follow suit.

The executive would be pleased to hear from any bootmakers who would be willing to do a'little repairing, and thus help to relieve extreme oases of distress. An offer has been received from Miss Mackersy. who is willing to make nightshirts. tho association would be pleased to receive donations of grey or striped flannelette for the. purpose. Donations of bed socks, soft slippers, pillow-slips with or without tapes or buttons. or material for making the same, will be thankfully received for ambulance, purposes. Donations of pillow-slips need not necessarily be. of new material.

Tho executive arc confident of a- splendid response to tho few appeals outlined above. Lastly, tho members of the association wish it stated that, they are hopeful that there will ho a. full representation of women at tho various halls in which meetings arc to be held on Wednesday afternoon with the object of raising funds for patriotic purposes. The women of Otago, as a whole, have responded nobly to tho numerous appeals made to them, and their presence at tho meetings will do much towards ensuring success.

The executive are very grateful to Mire Lawrence (D.1.C.), who, assisted by Misses Boss and Hill, spent the whole of Saturday afternoon cutting out blouses and dresses from material donated to the association.

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Bibliographic details

LATEST FROM EUROPE., Issue 15627, 19 October 1914

Word Count
3,170

LATEST FROM EUROPE. Issue 15627, 19 October 1914

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