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PANIC IN OSTEND.

COMING OF THE BARBARIANS. (London 'Times’ and Sydney ' Sun ’ Services.) LONDON. October 16. There were riotous scenes at Os tend when the steamers were taking off the lefimee? at the wharves. Three British sold’ers took chnree of the gangway*, and insisted upon the women and children going first Nevertheless, in the swaying crush many were maimed. A wail was raised when it was announced that no more vessels were available. Thousands remained, and a panic occurred when it wa? snorted that the Germans had occupied Bruges and were marching on Osfend. Women fainted ami children shrieked and ran about demented A Tan he aero'dane increased the terror by drooping bombs near the refu-gC-x The panic abated on the arrival of additional steamers. NEWS FROM ANTWERP. THE INVADER IN CHARGE. AMSTERDAM. October 16. A telegram from the Geiman beadmiarters states that the Germans made 5,W prisoners at Antwerp. The booty included 500 guns, Tinge quantities of war munitions, and food and wool of a total value of 10 million marks (£500.000). al-'o copper and f : lv»r valued at half a million marks (£95,000). Th’'rty-four German steamers were disrovered in the port. Somp had been burned, and in others the engines had Ivrcn destroyed. Tire docks had been rendered unworkable. Only 1.500 of the inhabitants are left in Antwerp, mostly old women and children. The refugees in Holland are afraid to accept the German advances to return desiring some guarantee that the promises that they will not be ill-treated will be 1-ent, It is stated at The Ha "lie that the Dutch Government have arranged terms with the Antwerp military authorities whereby the relieves mav return to Antwerp, out the Belgians will be liable for military service, and will be treated as prisoners of war. THE ENEMY’S GARRISON. ANTWERP, October 16. The German garrison consists of 17.000 men. Tire commander is demanding as Antwerp's war contribution the nrov’gion of wines and cigars valued at £2,000 daily. OUR LOSSES ” LONDON. October 17. Visitors from Antwerp state that the Germans are energetically reconstructing the Antwerp forte. The casualties of the British Naval Brigade at the siege of Antwerp were 12 killed and 89 wounded. THE RED CROSS. TALES OF GERMAN SAVAGERY. LONDON, October 16. The London County Council have organised 300 Red Cross classes. A German spy in Belgian uniform and with a Red Croea badge was arrested among the refugee? at Dover. Many suspects were arrested during the week in Channel ports. The Belgian Red Cross between Monday and Thursday transported a large number of wounded from Oc.te.nd to Great Britain. An aviator with a Tauho machine attempted to drop bombs on the Red Cross vessel Paris, lying at the Ostend quay, despite the fact that there, were wounded on ’stretchers on the deck. The bombs missed the Paris by 50 yards. The New York ‘American’ has published an affidavit from the engineers on board a Red Cross vessel that was formerly a Hamburg-Amerikan steamship, and which was chartered to bring refugees from the Continent. The affidavit states flat prior to her sailing the former German crew deliberately made the ship unseaworthy. ,and also liable to be, destroyed bv fire, bv rendering the pumps useless, stuffing blankets into the bilge pipes, and similar methods.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD19141019.2.16.5

Bibliographic details

PANIC IN OSTEND., Issue 15627, 19 October 1914

Word Count
544

PANIC IN OSTEND. Issue 15627, 19 October 1914

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