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THE SPORTING WORLD.

[From Oub London Correspondent.] March 21. ATHLETIC TRAINING. The Olympic movement has given a big fillip to all sports, and many youngsters are burning to emulate the doings of T. E. Meredith (of the U.S.A.), Arnold Jackson (of England), and Hanuea Kolehmainen (of Finland). The schoolboy and novice is very apt to- let his enthusiasm carry liim away, with the-result that he overdoes matters. Perhaps tho best advice about training for youngsters is to let it alone until full bodily growth has been reached. This, of oourso, applies to serious training. Exercise is quito another matter, and walking, skipping, and crosscountry running (strictly avoiding racing) will help everyone. Swedish exercises and breathing exercises should also bo followed, whilst tho benofits of sun baths cannot be told too often. As to diet, plain and wholesome food, with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables, must be the rule. Either very hot or very cold drinks should be avoided. Athletes of a spare build often benefit from drinking ale and stout, of course in moderation—say, one pint daily. Moderation and regularity are golden rules, and, of course, as much fresh air as possible. Practice in tho field events—jumping, shot-putting, hammer-throwing, etc.—can safely be indulged in, using impedimenta suitable to one's strength. Coming to running, pistol practice will not harm a young lad, but he should refrain from racing or running out in training. Save up the energy for the race, and remember that it is better to boundertrained than stale. The mind plays a big part in training;, and advisers should keep their charges Irom talking and thinking too much on the topic of their coming race or event. Tactics can be discussed with coaches and sound judges, and a young athlete can learn much by watching champions in their races. Tho beginner must strive to acquire a proper stylo at the start. Once a bad style is got into it is difficult to get out of it. In running, the body and head should bo slightly inclined I forward, the eyes being fixed on the track about lOvds ahead, and not at the sky, as some runners do. The arms should hang quite straight at tho sides. Body ana arms must not bo rigid, and any clenching of the hands is so much waste of energy, | the running being done with the feet and legs. In a word, remember that the body has to be carried, and the more smoothly this is done the easier the heart and lungs will be able to work.' All the power and energy must be concentrated in the legs, the arms and body being virtually passenfers. Remember, however, to incline the ead and body so that the balance is forward. The arms should assist the body to maintain a correct poise and an easy carriage, but the less movement the. better. Young athletes should learn how to walk properly, as a slovenly style in walking will bo harmful. Cultivate an upright carriage and a lively stride in ordinary walking, and don't get into a slouching style. Some of these general hints from an old-timer may be of use to beginners. The novice will also profit by seeking the advice of some old athlete who has " been through the mill." It may not always appeal to the youngster, but it is well to remember that experience is a good teacher. OLYMPIC -MATTERS. The appointment of a British Olympic Finance Committee is the preliminary to an appeal to the public for funds. What steps will be taken to discover and develop talent by the Olympic Association is not yet known. The most probable course will be to leave each association—that is, athletic, swimming, cycling, rowing, etc to make its own plans, Ore Olympic authorities making grants to each. There seems to be considerable opposition to the idea of securing an American trainer or coach to assist British athletes. The fact that the whole world has accepted 4he assistance of British coaches in various sports is ignored. British people have also gone abroad for teachers of painting, music, and other arts. It is doubtful if there is an Englishman, I either amateur or professional, who has the necessary experience to teach our men how to put the shot and throw tho hammer, discus, and javelin. There are Irishmen who know how to jump, shot-put, and hammer-throw, and plenty of 1-mglish-inen who understand running from A to It, but this is only part of the game. KOLFHMAINKNS DEFEAT. The news of the defeat of Hannes Kolchmaiiran by W. J. Kramer in tho two-mile indoor championship of America surprised many English authorities. Of course the Finn may have been "off color,'' or possibly lie has not got quite enough speed for two miles. From what the writer saw of Kolehmainen at Stockholm, he is inclined to think the Finn capable 'of running two miles in 9min, three miles in 14min, and 10 miles in SOmin. Kramer is evidently a much-im-proved runner, as, even allowing that the conditions indoors are more favorable, Omin 19* sec for two miles represents a very high-class performance, 'ihe American distance runner is improving, and ha may yet be just as formidable at 5 to 10 miles as he now is at the sprint and middle distance. BOXING. The value of aggressiveness was well illustrated at the National Sporting Club on Monday. In the match lor the championship of Ireland between Private Voyles, of the Irish Guards, and Packey Mahoney, of Cork, the former was by far the more finished boxer. Ho often got in blows, but they lacked the force to hurt his rival. Mihoney was always boring in, and should have been warned for leaning on his rival. When the Cork man hit he put power in the blows, and Voyles gradually grew weaker, so that he retired in tho sixteenth round, when fairly dazed.

Even more instructive was tho bout between J. Harrison, the English middleweight champion, and Harry Lewis, of America. The latter was nearly a stone lighter than the home man, and also at a disadvantage in height. The contest was soon over, Lewis getting in a smashing left early in the second round, which din tho business. The American dees not waste his strength with fancy work or tapping. Once within distance, however, he hits with vim. English boxers are e'ever and. plucky, but many lack aggressiveness or "devil." Occasionally a. man is clever enough to stay through a contest and win on points, but the knowledge ot how to hit hard is dying out. It would be a good thing if in ell important matches tho verdict was given as a. draw, in the event of both men being on their feet. This would lead to hard hitting, as, to gain the winner's end of the purse, a-knock-out would be necessary. _W« have no details of the bout at New York, wherein Bombardier Billy Wells wajs knocked out by Gunboat* Smith. Here, again, however, it seems to have been a case of a still puncher beating a clever boxer. Wells need not he discouraged, and if he does the right thing he will again climb tho ladder. He' has science aud pluck,, but, as so often pointed out in these notes, is too kind, lacking " devil" or aggressiveness in the ring. He should now remain in America, seeking matches with plenty of the lesser lights in the heavy-weight world. He will rueet with some more knock-outs, but will also acquire, the ability to hand out the winning punch himself.

FOOTBALL. —Rugby.— Tho match between England and Scotland at Twickenham last Saturday was ;i grand one. The home side \va* sorely tried at tho star-t, a high wind blowing tho ball along the ground in such an awkward manner that the men could not gather it. The Englishmen soon asserted themselves, however, and, winning scrum after serum, the ' backs were constantly busy. The passing was very accurate, but the '" threes" stood too close together, with .the 'result that when Coatcs or Lowe (on the wings) not tho ball they hod such a long way to run to get round the opposing wing that other Scots had time to come to the assistance. Coates (of Bath) did eomo grand things, end it was nothing unusual for him to aim 50 yards and hand off two or three players. The Scotch full-back (Wallace) proved a big stumbling-block, however, and, as pointed out, there v.as generally, time- for others W coir» aexost. A* isas a sub. by

Ooates which led up to tho only try of the match, just before the interval. He handed on to Potilton, who dodged through a few more players and transferred to Brown (of Oxford), who threw himself over the line. Lowe was nearly over for Encland in the second half, and Southerland wae checked when he looked liko scoring for Scotland, the ball rolling over the line. Tho Englishmen had so much the better of tho play that they ought to have scored three or four tries. Thev were also unlucky in having to play against a gale, the wind turning completely round at halftime in tho most extraordinary fashion. Scotland had the misfortune to havo Loun-den-Shand twist his knee at the interval, and he was .of little use afterwards. The win of England gave the wearers_ of the Rose the international championship with 3 wins, Wales (2 wins and 1 defeat) coming next, Scotland claiming 1 win to 2 defeats, and Ireland bringing up the rear with 3 defeats. —Soccer.— Scotland proved just a bit too clever for Ireland in the international at Belfast. Reid and Bennett scored for the visitors, and M'Knight got through for Ireland. Another international was played at Bristol on Monday, when tho English team defeated Wales by the odd goal in .'even. The winners were" more superior than the score indicates, and it looks as though the front line knows the way to find the net. Only Crompton of the side beaten by Ireland was playing, and such wholesale changes in the English side shows that the selectors recognised that strong measuies were necessary. A notable game on Monday was the Newcastle v. Sunderland cup tie, this l>eing tho third meeting of the teams, j J Sunderland scored 3 goals without response, and this on Newcastle's ground. IN GENERAL. A. Townsetul (of the Essex Beagles), who represented England in the last Olympic Games Marathon Ruce, won the Kent A.C. 15 Miles Road Race on Saturday, his time being lh 24min 59sec. Inman'e win over A. F. Peall in their heat of the B. and W. billiaid tournament assured the scratch man of first prize. The challenge round of the Army Singles Racquets Championship! enabled' Captain A. C. G. Luther to turn the tables on A. H. Muir, who defeated him last year. The Yorkshire Light Infantryman prevailed by 5 games fo 2 (66 aces to 61), and so regained the honors. The final of the Northern Lacro;se Flags Championship proved very onesided, Stockpoit beating Albeit Park bv 12 goals to 2. Holland Park rink was the scene of the One-mile Amateur Roller-skating Championship. The track measured nine laps to the mile, and W. R. Bowley (Aldwich), who won, covered the distance in smin 7i?ec. Tho intervarsity chess match this week had an extraordinary result, Oxford winning six games and drawing the seventh. It is announced that Tom Sullivan, the cx-champion sculler, has accepted an offer to coach the Berliner Ruder Ch'b, and he will probablv continue to instruct the Berlin oarsmen' until after the 1916 Olympic Game?. Doust (of Australia), who represented London in the return covered court lawn tennis matches against Paris, showed fine form against Oobert in the Singles. He beat the French crack bv 3 sets to 1, the scores being 6-3, 6-2, 5-7, 9-7. Gore also scored over Decugis and Gobert, but in the end the Frenchmen won by l'l matches to 13.

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Bibliographic details

THE SPORTING WORLD., Evening Star, Issue 15171, 30 April 1913

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THE SPORTING WORLD. Evening Star, Issue 15171, 30 April 1913

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