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The Evening Star. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1897

Our four-page supplement to-day contains London correspondeoce, an interesting paper by Mr Bastings, University examina. tion results, notes on the band contest, cablegrams, etc.

The Otago Art Society's exhibition was opened last night. Our report is crowded oat. Other matter shares the Bame fate.

The volunteer camp will be open to visitors to-morrow afternoon from two o'clock. The gates will be closed during the forenoon. We feel sure that the community will hear with deep regret that the condition of Professor Parker, of the Otago Universitv, is very serious; indeed, 'his medical attendants (Drs Colquhoun and Burns) have given up all hope of him pulling through his illness.

The American Consul (Mr W. G. Neill) has arranged for the accommodation on shore of the shipwrecked crew of the Commodore, brought to Dunedin yesterday by the barque Nor'-Wester. The crew were for about three weeks on Maiden Island before being picked up, and speak[(in terms of praise of their treatment by the three white men living on the island. The captain is still reticent as to the cause of the mishap. The University examinations, which are to be conducted this year in the Agricultural Hall, commence on Monday. The arrangements, which are to be very complete, include the providing of a small table for each candidate. The. matriculation examinations, which commence on December 7, are also to be held in the Agricultural Hall, when the same sitting arrangements will be in force. For the latter examinations there are 183 candidates.

Mr Wybert Reeve gave hi 3 second cinematographic exhibition at the Princess's Theatre last evening before an audience that were most appreciative in their approval of the many pictures shown by this very remarkable machine, which is, without doubt, the most superior of its class that has been seen in this City. The scenes were exceedingly life-like, and, although there was very little to pick and chose from Mr Reeve's large assortment of interesting pictures, perhaps the best views were those of Truer's serpentine dance, the Czar's entry to Paris, the Prussian dragoons at jumping practice, and M'Kinley addressing the populace in Washington. Miss Hope Nation again sang two solos in good style; while Mr Reeve himself contributed two recitations. Mrs Gallaugher, who presided at the piano, played very appropriate music. Another entertainment will be given to-night.

The Railway Department in this issue an£h!K S e «?v. n . ar L ran g en >ents for the Taleri show on the 16th mat.

-t^L 81160 ?? 1 ' im ?- tab 'e of the Portobello ferry S. • T °J- W ? i for the 9th of November appears in this wane.

The Otago Art Society's exhibition in the l/horal Hall la open daily from 10 am. to 6 30 p.m. and from 7.30 to 10 p.m. _Thei anniversary services of the Dundas street punitive Methodist Sunday School will be held to-morrow. Entertainment and presentation pf prises on Wednesday evening. The meeting of sympathisers in connection With the engineers' strike and lock-out will be held to-morrow afternoon in the .Agricultural Hall, when Alderman BenTillett will deliver an address.

The service to-morrow night at the Garrison Hall will be conduoted by the Rev. T. W. Newbold. A cornet solo, ' Tho promise of life,'' will be played, with orchestral accompaniment, and the quartet 'Ood so loved the world' will be sung.

Lost in London,' at the City Hall this lng, should draw a house judging by the favor with which it was received oii o former occasion. Special scenery haa been painted, and Mr Lucas will add material strength to the bill bv a dramatic recital of Sims's celebrated poem 'A tale of two women.'

The Salvation Army to-night are having a temperance meeting. To-morrow (Sunday), the adherents are notified, there is no meeting in the barracks, Cowling street, at 3 p.m. as usual, thiß being on account of a funeral procession, ro-rnorrow, at 7 p.m., a menorial seivioe re the late Miss J. Fowler will be held.

The Rev. Dr Rou ße , M.A., LL.B., who is making a hurried trip through the colony, will preach thrice in the City to-morrow-at John street, CaVeraham, in the morning, at South Dunedin in the afternoon, and at Hanover street in the evening. Dr Rouse is an eminent Indian linguist, and has long teen employed as a ~ uth ? r an(l tran ßlator in connection with tile Baptist Mission Press in Calcutta. He hasi just finished the ninth revision of the Bengali Bible, originally translated by Dr "William Carey, and is visiting these colonies in order to recruit his health. Dr Rouse proceeds to Melbourne on Monday in company with the Rev. A. North.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1897, Evening Star, Issue 10464, 6 November 1897

Word Count
778

The Evening Star. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1897 Evening Star, Issue 10464, 6 November 1897

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