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EN AVANT.

" By moor and hollow By crag and peat, What dost thou follow With flying feet?" Neath the sunny skies. Where the wind is free, Iheres a white bird flies, fc>o fair to see. Could I but caress His plumes of snow, No more loneliness I e'er should know." "By moor and hollow, .By crag and peat, \\ hat dost thou follow W l ™ lagging feet?" Aeath the sullen skies, By the ice-bound springs. «&? a white bird flies With weary wings.. Could I touch at last His pinions fair, Iml1 m I f' 0 * were P M * And all my care. The sunset's dying Fron; this lone hill. Who art thou, lying ( So calm and still?" On the mist-clad way My bird I found Where cold ho lay On the frozen ground. His plumes grown dim Tp my heart I've pressed. As for me and him, >Ve shall have rest." -May Kendall, in 'New York Tribune.'

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18971106.2.38.33

Bibliographic details

EN AVANT., Evening Star, Issue 10464, 6 November 1897, Supplement

Word Count
156

EN AVANT. Evening Star, Issue 10464, 6 November 1897, Supplement

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