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MISS COLONIA IN LONDON.

CONFIDENCES TO HER COUSIN

ACROSS THE SEA,

London, September 10. Dear Cousin,—We have just returned to town after a fortnight at Buxton, whither the doctors sent father for his rheumatism. Buxton lies in the heart of the Peak country, and is the highest town in Engrand, standing I,oooft above the level of the sea. It is consequently very, very breezy and bracing, and restores shattered nerves and brains surprisingly soon. But the raison d'Mre of the place is, of course, its marvellous spring, which contains more nitrogen than any of the Continental spas, and works wonders for bad cases of rheumatism, gout, and kindred complaints. Colonials afflicted thus almost always make for Aex-les-bains or Bath. They would find Buxton cheaper and more amusing. It contains very fine public, gardens, where the inevitable band plays twice a day, and where energetic youth can on several series of superb lawns disport itself blithely with tenuis, croquet, and bowls. For the less active there is golf over perhaps the most artfullyconstructed and perfectly-kept links in Eogland, and for those who don't or won't gambol, walks and excursions in numbers. The latter include the Izaak Walton Valley, of Dovedale, Haddon Hall, Rowßley, and Chatsworth. Of course, we visited all these places, and many more. Chatsworth is most disappointing. The park certainly makes one envious, and the gardens (which were laid out by Sir Joseph Paxton) are worth walking through. But the house is a cheerless barrack, and despite pictures, frescoes, and marvellous carving, hopelessly cold and bare. Father was ordered " cheerful society," so, instead of going, as usual, to rooms, we stayed at a huge caravansary called the Palace Hotel. This appeared to me to hit the acme of luxurious discomfort. Marble halls and mouldy meat, gilded saloons and graceless service. We dined at 6 30 instead of eight, and the evenings were interminable. Father, of course, walked off to the smoking room, were gouty old gentlemen entertained each other discussing " symptoms." I had not even this resource, and could do nothing but read. For downright deadly dulness commend me to hotel life in provincial England.

FOR FORTY THOUSAND FOUNDS.

The Windward, with Mr Jackson and the Harmsworth expedition aboard, has returned, but, needless to say, without -having discovered the North Pole or anything else of importance. When one reflects that this Arctic sojourn—for it amounted to little more—cost £40,000 one feels cros3. So much could be done in London with such a sum. It does appear terrible waste. This time, too, even the danger which usually forms part of Arctic expeditions was absent. Nothing can be more prosaic than Mr Jackson's story. Proceeding to give details of his party's life far North, he said :

Not one of our party has had a minute's illness since we left England, and a jollier, healthier, and busier little community never existed. Every niinute of our time was occupied; even during the long Arctic winters time never huDg heavily on our hands. Of course, when we were away on our expeditions our movements were necessarily uncertain, but while at Elmwood during the winter we kept regular hours. In the Arctic the sun sets for the last time about the middle of October, and is not again visible until the third week in February. During those long four months our days were spent as follow:—" We breakfasted at half-past eight, after which we performed our household duties sweeping up, washing, and attending to the dogs. After that we all went for a run on ski, or, when the weather was so bad as to prevent this, took exercise round the house. Returning in two or three hours, we set to work on any jobs that were in hand such as the making of tents (of which wo completed two last winter), the repairing and manufacture of fresh fledge harness for the dogs, and anything else that was wanted. We dropped having lunch, but at two o clock we had tea, bread and butter, and cheese. At half-past seven we dined, and until half-past eleven (when we turned in for the night) amused ourselves with reading and smoking. It may be interesting to persons other than Arctic men to know that from the date of the disappearance of the suu until the second week in November there is a period of two or three hours' twilight in the middle of the day. From November till February mid-Jay and midnight are practically alike. During the whole of our stay in Franz Josef Land we always had plenty of provisions—we practically lived on loon, an Arctic bird, of which I shot no less than 1,400 last |utumn and froze for the winter. Last autumif I set free nineteen loons and twenty-two kittiwakes, to each of which I attached a copper label marked with the letter ' J.' It will be a matter of great interest if any of these are phot in Norway, the Noith of Scotland or elsewhere, as it will indicate the place to which these birds migrate for the winter. On the whole, last winter was mild for the Arctic. The thermometer registered as low as 4Sdeg below zero, but on occasions jumped to 20deg. Of course, we had to exercise the greatest care not to expose ourselves unnecessarily, and, with the exception of the eyes, we were always completely covered.

essential of the Peculiar creed that in Biokness only prayer may be used, and any member of the sect calling in medical aid is thenceforth deemed lacking in faith and undergoes the'somewhat humiliating ordeal of being prayed for at the P.P. meetings. Ihe result is that in many cases unfortunate men, women, and children suffer untold agonies and die simply for lack of a doctor's ministrations. Doubtless dozens of these murders in the name of religion never come to light, and hitherto in those cases which .have occupied coroners' attention the culpable parties have been let off with censure, simply because English juries have not, as a rule, liked to punish a man or woman for acting in accordance with the spirit of their religious beliefs. Happily for the children of these Peculiar People, it seems that inhuman conduct is no longer to be condoned on the score of religion, and the father of a hapless little child who died at Mayfield road, Plaistow, the other day has been committed by the West Ham coroner to take his trial for manslaughter. At the inquest Mary Ann Vince, the mother, stated that the deceased was one of twins. Witness in her confinement was attended by a midwife. When about three weeks old witness noticed that the deceased showed signs of convulsions. About three weeks ago it seemed very much worse.—The Coroner: What did you do for it»—Witness: I didn't do anything-only prayed to the Lord.—Coroner: Did the child recover ?—Witness :It got worse; it had a cold and severe cough.—Did you send for a doctor then?-Witness: No. I sent for Brother Southgate, who laid hands on in the name of the Lord. In reply to further questions witness said the deceased still continued to get worse, so she sent for Sister Jarvis and Brother Southgate again*-and the same proceedings were gone through. Although deceased got rapidly worse, she still trusted in the Lord.—The Coroner: And the child died withont any doctor after being ill three weeks ?—Witness: Yes, sir. —The Coroner : Is it essential to your creed not to have a doctor ?—Witness: We can call one in if we like.—The Coroner: Was your husband aware that the child was ill ? —Yes.— The Coroner: You also know it was dangerously ill ?—Witness : Yes. I thought possibly it would die. The Coroner: Your conscience allowed you to have a midwife. Why didn't you have one of the elders to abtend yon if you so entirely trust in the Lord. You go outside your own creed for yourself, but not for your child.

James Southgate a laborer, said he was elder of the sect. He laid hands on the deceased on the 16th, 27th, and 31st of August last, bat did not anoint him.—A Juror : Then you didn't carry out the word of the Lord. You were sent in the name of the Lord and didn't do your duty?— Witness (indignantly) : I have seen the Lord.—A Juror : You never have seen him.—Another Juror: You are the doctor, I suppose.— Witness, rising from his seat: lam not a doctor, sir. lam a servant of the Lord.—A Juror : It is about time these people were taught their duty and made to call in doctors.—Another Juryman : If one of your sect call in a doctor would they be looked down upon ?—Witness: I should think them short of f*ith.

Dr Carey, who made a post-mortem examination, said he fonnd lobular pneumonia and signs of advanced bronchitis, which was the cause of death. A doctor might have saved the child's life. The fact of one not being called in certainly accelerated death.—The Coroner, in summing up, said that the law was quite clear with reference to a case of this description. Parents are compelled to call in a. doctor. If the death wore accelerated in any way by their failing to do their duty they were liable to punishment. Their religion had nothing to do with it.—The jury retired, and, after consulting half an hour, returned mto court and said that twelve out of the thirteen agreed—" That Arthur Vince, on the 3rd day of September, died from pneumonia, accelerated by negleot of the father, George Vince, in not oalling in a doctor, and that the said George Vinco did feloniously slay and kill the said Arthur Yinoe."—The father was then committed to take his trial

tuccoß. ju uuu-pasc seven we emeu, and until half-past eleven (when we turned in for the night) amused ourselves with reading and smoking. It may be interesting to persona other than Arctic men to know that from the date of the disappearance of the sun until the second week in November there is a period of two or throe hours’ twilight in the middle of the day. From November till February mid-lay and midnight are practically alike. During the whole of our stay in Franz Josef Land we always had plenty of provisions—we practically lived on loon, an Arctic bird, of which I shot no less than 1,400 last |utumn and froze for the winter. Last autumif I set free nineteen loons and t wenty-t wo kitti wakes, to each of which I attached a copper label marked with the letter ‘ J.’ It will be a matter of great interest if any of these are shot in Norway, the North of Scotland or elsewhere, as it will indicate the place to which these birds migrate for the winter. On the whole, last winter was mild for the Arctic. The thermometer registered as low as 4Sdeg below zero, but on occasions jumped to 20deg. Of course, we had to exercise the greatest care not to expose ourselves unnecessarily, and, with the exception of the eyes, we were always completely covered. A GRAND OLD LADY. There will be a notable family party at Copenhagen next week to celebrate the eightieth birthday of that redoubtable old lady, the Queen of Denmark, the mother of our Princess of Wales, the Empress of Russia, and the Duchess of Cumberland. Her Majesty is wise and venerable, as she was once beautiful. She brought her loving and lovely daughters up on a plan of her own, and in the strictest and yet homeliest fashion. They rewarded her by attracting the best matches in Europe. The Princess of Wales goes to Copenhagen every autumn, but the Prince seldom accompanies her. The highly cultured tone and serious atmosphere of the Danish Court is not to his taste. H.R.H. will, however, join the family party this time, and instead of billiards or whist after, dinner may have to put up with hearing his wife and mother-in-law play severely classical duets.

* A RATIONAL DRESS EXPEDITION. I The New Woman was to the front last , week. For some time paragraphs had been, 3 appearing in the papers about a gathering at 1 Oxford of lady cyclists—devotees of the » rational costume—and the Congress, as they ; called it, came off on Saturday last. A contangent was to ride from London, and although the exact time and place of start- [ mg had been kept pretty quiet a great r c ™wd collected at Hyde Park corner i shortly before ten o’clock. As a rule a lady cyclist can ride round London in bloomers f without attracting anything beyond passing , notice, but the first one to arrive at the > rendezvous on Saturday was made the i object of very unpleasant attentions: The ; crowd was expecting something, and as soon f as she dismounted they fairly mobbed her. b Ihe police ordered her off, and threatened ' her with arrest for blocking the roadway ' However, by ten o’clock three ladies in ralionals and one gentleman had collected, b and * cr °wd reminding one of an Anarchist 5 meeting in Trafalgar square (except that [ they were well dressed) surged all round the r corner and fairly paralysed traffic. At least [ twelve ladies were expected to turn up, but . wind and lowering sky no doubt i made thei « think better of it. However, the , three who had come up to the scratch took ’ advantage of the first stroke of ten from a t neighboring clock to set out and escape from the mob, After they had gone two nicely j dressed and befurbelowed old ladies came up to a Press representative and asked : “If \ y° u Pkase, can you tell us where the ladies’ s r?® ea aro S° in g to be? What, no races! Why, it was in the paper ! Splendid races, 7 beautiful costumes, lovely prizes, it said ' ” b So the y , won t away disappointed, like a great ■ 7 others. After the main party of three j had left there was a rather funny incident for the delectation of the crowd at Hvd« Park

jezreel's tower. Of quaint religious sects and unobtrusive Antichrists there are no end even in England. Few of you, I imagine, will have heard of the Jezreelites, an all but defunct community, whose temple or tower near Chatham was on Monday last offered for sale at Tokenhouse Yard. The Jezreelites believe they are immortal. Their sect was founded by a private soldier named White, who, in due course, blossomed into Jamea Jersmon Jezreel. This cognomen ought of itself to have given the fellow away as a flagrant impostor. But " there is no death" was a seductive doctrine, and whilst the world goes round there will always be plenty of fools to fall victim to novel religious crazes. Jezreel attraoted many oonverts, and also cash, from all quarters. With the latter he founded a oollege for the training of preachers for the seot, and the tower was planned for the housing of 144,000 of the "latter" people, whe are not to taste death. Unfortunately White died before the tower was finished, and his wife, Queen Esther as she was called, also proved the error of the dootrinea she had been teaching by succumbing to an affection of the kidneys. The scheme had, however, enabled her to drive about for some years in handsomely.appointed car» riages, and to live in a style that is not usually possible for the wife of a private soldier. The buildings must be extensive, as the auctioneer on Monday declared they cost £70,000, and that 620 tons of iron were used in the construction of the tower. Before biddings commenced it transpired that a number of the Jezreelites (or Latter Day Israelites) were still resident at the tower, and a gentleman present suggested they might be difficult to eject. "Pooh! pooh !" said the auctioneer, " they've had a quarter's notice, and they'll go quietly enough." " I doubt it," responded the first speaker; " they intend to remain there till the crack of doom, and will fight for their homes if driven to it. You'll see." -

corner. Just a few minutes after the first three had escaped the crowd two other rationally-dressed lady cyclists came up and started on a search for the " Congress " They peered round to try and find another belated wearer of the bifurcated garment amoDg the cyclists who had assembled to witness the departure. There was nobody, however, and, glad to get out of earshot of the things the crowd said, they Btarted off on theic own. The sailor hat of one was flyng in the wind, and her short hair streaming out in apparently a vain endeavor to catch np with it. It "was a sight that provoked the merriment of the crowd, and they went away in a good humor with a general impression that the whole thing was a " blooming/aseo." The party were swelled a little after leaving London, and they battled on resolutely in the face of the heavy head wind. Only one or two gave up and oompleted the journey by train. All along the route the cyclists received quite a reoeption, and at Slough the people turned out and lined the roads as though it were a Jubilee procession. A member of the party has collected some of the comments passed on the party by the way. " Pip-pip ,r seemed to be the favorite ory, bub there were endless phrases used of which the following is a fair sample i—'•Now we shan't be long," "Oh ! look at her bloomers," "Ain't she got lovely calves," « Turn 'em out to grass," saDg out the lads. " They're a disgraoe to our sex," shouted some of the women. " Disgusting " said some of the men. Others Beemed appreciative and oalled out merely "Bravo • go it, bloomers !" or " Oh! ain't she beautiful, as some pretty girl paseed, or "Oh, lor! there's beef," as the heavy-weights went by. In the villages the children and women were all waiting to see them pasß. And at each few detached houses the child who first caught sight of the procession at once set up a cry of "oh mother, look, look!" while bigger ones shouted: "Pip-pip, women in men's trousers!" or "They've'got their fathers' breeohea on!" . The reception at the old Conservative City of Oxford seems to have been slightly more assuring. A number of cyclists conducted the worn-out London contingent, at least the first of them, into the town, and to the resting place at the Clarendon Hotel. There they -were welcomed by Lady Harbeton and * party who had had a most enjoyable run from Cbeltenham with the wind. Oxford, it is said, bore a livelier aspect than it has done for years. Thousands were- in the -streets to witness the arrival, and a large number of extra constables had to be put on to keep the roads open. A peculiar deadlock occurred just before dinner, which was served at nine. A lady journalist who had run np

This deliverance threw & wet blanket over the proceedings. Somebody proposed the conditions of sale should be altered so as to defer the date of completion until possession was obtained. But the auctioneer, whilst stoutly averring.the Jezreelites would quietly take themselves off, declined to make the alteration. Ultimately the property was withdrawn at £3,950. So the Jezreelites will not, in all probability,. be immediately evicted from their tower.

a "peculiar" mother.

The vagaries of the religious seot known as the "Peculiar Peoplo" are being constantly brought to light in the coroners' courts of the East End. It is apparently an

from London by. train wished to be preeent at the banquet, which, of course, was the main feature of,the proceedings. She was a lady of unusually massive proportions, and had neither ridden a bik.e jior donned bloomers in her life. The law of the ladyirationalists, to the effect that ,;M skirts; : are riot to be tolerated under anyj circumstances, either on cyoles or / off," was, like the edicts'of the Medes and Persians, unalterablev »- : Fdr some time it seemed as if there would Toe : a row. borne of the ladies absolutely refused to sit down to table if anyone appeared in a skirt, while others went so far as to say that if a skirt were admitted they would take off their bloomers and be done with the whole iu ?"• • p waSL thO&tteis who settled the business, for, as they had nothing but bloomers and nightdresses with them, it impossible to let them ca'rry out their threat.' 1 Bo the. lady journalist, was, lent a pair ,of unmentionables by a lady who had an extra suit, and she sat down with the other fifty; Of course at first she looked very uncbmforV able, but after a bit this wore off. On the bunday morning there was to be a parade, but it was so' miserably wet that it had to be declared off, and the only item of the proposed programme carried out was the judging of the costumes and the awarding of the first, second, and third. prizes. Some rode back to London and some came back by tram. The most original remark heard during the whole proceedings was perhaps that of a small boy who yelled out after 5 some of the returning cyclists : " Misß, ain't it time you was getting into long 'uns?" ihe gathering is to be repeated next year, when it is hoped that under better weather conditions it will be more of a success. These advocates of rational costume for women seem any way to have had the strength of their convictions. I remember a rather amusing instance in New Zealand in which ladies rationally dressed, although they may have had the strength of their conviotions, did not care to face openly the stares of the adult community and the jeers of the small boy. It was a number of years ago, when Christchurch olaimed to lead the advanced woman movement in the colonies : and, as far as that goes, I think the same claim is still put forward by the people of Canterbury's. chief centre. However, the time I refer to was before the rage for bicycles, and when walking was a favorite pastime. A band of ladies who advocated the rational dress determined on a , smajl demonstration. They went very cannily about it. Costumed in blouses and bifurcated lower garments, they collected in the morning at the railway station. There was no improper display of any sort, however,, for each and every female wore a long macintosh reaching almost to the ground. In faot, no one on the platform hardly suspected the party attired in the extremely long macintoshes. They took their tickets to a station in the direction of Rakaia, and when well away from civilisation they left the train, and, removing their cloaks, gambolled about to their heart's desire. The only persons who come across their path were a few country yokels, who as hastily as possible removed themselves to other parts. A return was made to town in the evening in the same decorous manner in which it had been left in the morning, and there the demonstration ended. They certainly did no one any harm by their demonstration, but I think last Saturday's was more the kind of affair to either kill the rational drees fad or to increase the number of its advocates.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18971106.2.38.30

Bibliographic details

MISS COLONIA IN LONDON., Issue 10464, 6 November 1897, Supplement

Word Count
3,906

MISS COLONIA IN LONDON. Issue 10464, 6 November 1897, Supplement

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