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OVER THE CHESS BOARD.

[CONDOCTED BY J. W. MBIXOB, B.SC.]

SoumoN of Problem So. 243. Key move: Kt-Q sq. . . "O.B." sends correct solution NO3. 242-4,

PROBLEM No. 245. Orro Wurzburo, Grand Rapids.

Black 0 pieces.

White 5 pieces. White to play and mate in two moves.

. GAME ENDING. , This diagram shows the ending of a game played at Kieff between Prince Dadian, of Mingrelie (white), and M. Sahirmer (black),-taken from •' La Strategie Journal d'Echecs':— r .•-•,-, . : Black 11 pieces

White 10 vieces. White to.play. The, game continued :

A GAME FOR STUDENTS, GAME XXII. AND LAST.

The following beautiful game, with notes compiled from various sources by the French chess journal 'La Strategie. Journal de> Echecs,' from which they have been trans-, lated, was the last played in the- match between Tchigorin (white), the Russian expert, and Dr Tarrasch (black), of Germany. Winning this game saved Tchigorin a stake of 6,250fr. In the whole conduct of the game Tchigorin has surpassed himself, and the. ending is a perfect masterpiece:

NOTES. a Better 7 than p-lc kt 3 played in the twentieth game. ........ b Up to this point the opening is identical with that of the eighteenth game, in which Tqhigorin played 9 Kt-Q 83. The text move prevents temporarily the advance of the adverse knight to <l~kt s:Kt-KB3isstronger. >.'."<•' c To prevent 10 P-Q 4, which would give White a good position. T,his proves that when-p-q b 4 i 3 not played, the first player can always play. P-Q 4 with good effect. d If 11 P x P, Black could have followed with 11 kt-q b 4, with an excellent game. If 12 B-K 2, kt-q 6 ch; 13 B x Kt, qx b; 14 Q-K B 3, q-q b 7, White would have a b&d game, for the threatened q-kt.7 could only be warded off by 15 Kt-Q B 4,- then q-q b 8 ch ; 16 Q-Q sq. winning a pawn. If instead of 15 Kt-Q B 4 White should try to win the Queen by 15 Castles, q-q kt 7.; 16 Q-Qsq (if 16 Q-Q 3, r-q sq). qx r; 17 Q-Q B 2, kt-q 5; immediately freein? the queen. c A good move, which probably took Dr Tarrasch by surprise. / If 12 kt xQ r; 13 Caatles Q R wins a Piece. Black's development in this game is inferior. : V W Better than moving the Queen, for then would follow kt-k 5. The game now presents a dangerous, character, and against thejSermaijmaster, since this gives his opponent* at least: an 'equal chance of drawing the match. hj The retreat of this knight is profoundly calculated, and serves to strengthen the attack on KBP. i Better than 16. B-K 2,> because later theßishop threatens Black's k r p. j To enable him to reply to 16 Kt-K Kt sby kt-k b3. If 15 qxb p; 16 Qx K P ch, k-r sq; 17 Kt-Q 5, etc. If 15 kt xq p; 16 Kt x Kt, q x ktr; 17BxRPch, etc. • .-> ...:.-. ■ >'. k He could not take the B P either'with r or q on account of B x R P ch, q x b ; 18 Kt-K Kt 5 ch. I A great mistake. The Queen should have gone to K Kt 5. m Another ingenious surprise of Tchigorin's, probably unforeseen by his opponent. ?i He has nothiDg better. If 19 p-k 4; 20 B-Q B 4 ch, k-r sq; 21 Kt-K Kt 5 wins. o Many consider this move a mistake, and say that by 20 r x kt pch Black would win a second pawn and the game. Suppose, however, 20 rx kt p ch; 21 K-R sq, pxq ;22 Kt-K 5, kt xkt (seems - forced); 23 P x Kt, kt-q 4 ; 24 Kt-K 4, r-kkt2; 25 Kt-K B 6 ch, with a strong attack worth the two pawns at least. Tchigorin from this onwards pushes his advantage of position with much energy. p If 21 r x q p, then Kt x Kt, followed by B x R P ch, wins .the exchange. <j It is difficult to discover ivhat-Tchigorin would have done'had Black novv'played! 23 kt* xt. Perhaps he would simply have sliut in the Kt by R-Ksq. 24 R-Q 8 would be inferior. ' v r By 24 Kt x Kt, V x 'kt; 25 R x P, b xp,the game would be equalised. ''- • ' ■"'•. s He could not play 24b-q2bn account of 25 Rx Kt,pxr;26Kt-KB6ch. ■ '• ' ' . .. t If 26.kt x kt;. 27 B xB, r-q kt sq; 28 Px Kt, 'r xb; 29.R-Q 7; with in'excellent game. • -' - ; •-' u If 27 k-kt 3 ; 28 P-K R4, threatening mate byb.k4. ' '. - ■-, ' ; -f T : ' v Black misses his last chance by this.- K2B b xb; 29 Kt-K B 6 ch, k-b'2; 39 Kt x BJ' If 30 Kt x P, p.q b3, etc.. If p x kt; 31 Rx P, k-k 3; the .game • would be drawn. • After the-SeSt-feove the White ->«coa*4wnbecomesy.ett-%troriK.'.i-. '

30fttx T QI', bx kt m?R x 8,-K-fi"3;rbrlugini" aboiiti thewsitiotf'gi.ven infthonwecedine; .note. , a; by !R x P. oh, fpr-.the.result would be an. end eame of. pawns >.;» #• Practically >the "winning move. Tchigorin j)lays all thia *nd feame jii greafcßtyle^. 2 White has the Advantage of a passed pawn,,' and a JCmght agajnst a Bishop ;.but the end game requires great care, ... ■. "• b 3; If,Tß'rksq ; n9t f > ', 40i{ ?' Kt3 ' animate next move/ If39fl«flch,k-b2; 40RxiB,' eiti - .-.-; • •i.vi e i gamfe J s''*on 5 this pawn cannot be taken' without losing the:pawns oh the'."King's side, and leaving White with hyoTimted.passed pawns. cc This destroys Jilack's hope of winning- the l passed pawn, ,C~f" ",.•••., - ' r : : : dd etc.; and T if rxp; 46'Kt-QB'cV, and Wins: •ee The King being able'to' conJeito therescue, the end is merelya question wi . *•'#;A-.lastattempt,■■•£;.'>. ,-.-i,,: 3 ,>..■,,.;..•.. ; , ; . ■ ■.".'' vX-:ffrf'..ltkx.PiWKitq.BiiU-wotild-'remaia.with ? t'\v'6 ;: passed pawns. ■■■''■■' ■'":.':' _;«»' If 54 p-q b7: 55 P-K Kt 6 ch, kit 2; 5S &&?£\K r W<':Rf. EG r x kt; 57 RQ B s'wins.] 57 6, p queens; 58 P queens arid White, mates in three. '""* • -

;V-;'''::. ; '-vr. r ' NOTES..:■■.';■;; -<o\ ' "In the year 1698, when Peter the Great waa in the^English dockyards in. the garb of in artisan, learning the art of shipbuilding by day and. drinking,.brandy' and pepper with Lord Caemarthan at night, there aroße in hiß';pwn';cpuntry which caused him tohaßteiiback to I&obcow. A'fter the discontented had been ..crushed Peter introduced some aocial reforms. Ambngat the amusements. of, the; evening: were .dancing, draughts, and ohess.;. Peter the Great iwaa not the only monarch who favored-chess, Napoleon the Great; being also a cheas player^and-when' exiled ;St.' Helena he arid Count'Bertrand frequently indulged in the game. One. of these games has been placsd on;;record,-;*when Napoleon defeatß the count in eighteen, moves,, but thereiis a note at the bottom of the^record which, in referring to the; oounfs thirteenth, move, flays: " This aeema. a courtier-like move on the part of -BertranxL": -According .to •Wilkinson's.' Manners ,Customsvof the Ancient Egyptians' -there has been: digcovered on one of the tonibs ; pj Thebes a representation of Rattieles 111., who reigned' some 3,500 yealrß ago, indulging in the royal pastime, and the ruler of the land of mummies appears to be gettmg the better of the Who;Jknowsvbut.what the courtier-like behaviour' referred". to above was not praotised in this game also by the King's opponent? At any rate' it would appear that Napoleon did not win his game by good play, and possibly the feline Worshipper of centuries ago may also have been indebted to the", diplomacy of his adversary in scoring a win.—"En Passant," in 'Observer.'

The Queen must be preserved at any price. The'Kriight' has a chronic eccentric movement. . ~;" .";*. .';;;'"'..,.;'."": '■' •■ The Bishop father enjoys «' th'e'plav." The King iS"never ." mated" till late in life. " -■■■'■• "•■ ' .>'.•> ■

" Stale mate " is nothing to do witbStale

sausages.' You can take a castle and still not win sir.

A SCRATCH GAME

The following skirmish was played between Messrs J. "Edwards (white) ,and Clayton, (black), at the local club rooms on the'23rd' inst.:— "'■

White. Black. White. Black lK.t-KR6chK.-Rsq 4,Kt-K6ch! KxK 2 R x Kt P x'Kt ,- 5Q-KB5ch K-K2 3K£K'-Kt6 K-Kt2 • 6Kt-QB5chQK3 And White mates in three moves.

FRENCH DEFENCE. . White. Black. White., ack. \ P-Kh' P-K 3 31 Kt-KB6chKKt2 .2.Q-K2 ■, B-K 2 32 KtxQP-a P-QB4 33 R-KBsq-i/R-Qsq 3T-QKt3 P-Q 4 4 B-Kt2 If-K B 3 34 R-K B 5 R-Q 3 5BxB KtxB 35 R-K 5 R-Q eq ■■ 6 P-K 5 . Kt-Q 2 36 K-B 2-z . B-Q B 3 -7 Q-KKt4 Castles-a 37 Kt-K B 4 R-K B 8 P-K B 4 Kt-Q B 3 sq-aa, 9 P-Q B.3-& P-Q 5-c 38K-Kt3 K-B 3 10 Kt-K B 3 PxP 39 P-K 7-66 K-Q B sq 11 Kt x P-rt Kt-Q B 4 40 R-K 6 ch K-B 2 12 P-Q 4e P-KB4-/U1 RxP B-K 5 . 13PxPe.p.-£f QxBP 42 R-K 6 P-QKt2 14 R-Q sq Kt-Q 2-h 43 R-Ksq B-QB3 15 B-Q 3:t Q-K R 3-j 144 P-K Kt 5 R-K sq 1C Cities Kt-KB3-t|45 Kt-K6-cc R-Q B sq: 17 Q-KKt3-i 18 Q-K R"4 ! Kt-K R 4 dd RxP 4fi Kt-K B 8 K^Kt2 19 P-KK£4-» i Kt-KB3-nl 47 R-K 6 K-B 2 20 QxQ 21 Kt-K 5 • PxQo 48 R-K 5 K-Ktsq' RxRch-p|49 K-B4-ee B-Ksq 22 B x R Kt x Kt 50 K-B 5 v P-QKt4-/ 23 P x Kt Kt,Q 4-<7 P-QKt3-s 51 v.Q 5 K-B2 24 Kt-K 4-r 52 Kt x P P-QBS-ffff 25 B-K Kt 2 B-Q Kt 2 '53 Kt-K B 6 P-QB6 26Kt-KB6chK-Kt2-e 54 R-K 5 K-Kt2-M 27 Kt-KR5chK-Ktsq-u 55 Kt x B ch R x Kt 28 B x Kt PxB-t; 56 K-K 6 R-Q B sq 23 P-K 6-io B-QB3 57 K-Q7 P-QB7 30 R-Q B sq B-K£q 58 R-K sn Resigns.

MUZtO GAMBIT. ■ : .. White. . Black. White.' . Black. 1 P-K /, P-K h 10 Bjc P BxB 2 P-KBU PxP 11 QxB Kt x P 'A Kt-KES P-K Kt h 12Q-R6ch K^Ktsq 4 B-B U P-Kt o 13 B x Kt B-K3 5 P-Qlt 'Pxlit 14 Kt-B3 P-QB3 6 Gastles Kt-K B 3 15.BxB Q-x P ch 7Q.xP ■■: £-9 4 - 16K-Rsq ... Q-Kt2 8PxP B-Q3 17BxPch , KxB 9 R-K sq ch KB fq White mates two move?.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18971030.2.40.3

Bibliographic details

OVER THE CHESS BOARD., Issue 10458, 30 October 1897, Supplement

Word Count
1,675

OVER THE CHESS BOARD. Issue 10458, 30 October 1897, Supplement

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