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The Evening Star SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1897.

Mr John Roberts, whose health has greatly improved, sailed yesterday from London for Duncdih.

Our supplement to - day contains the moderator's address to the Presbyterian Synod, parliamentary and other current news, also chess, cycling, aod yachtin" notes. °

It was stated in the Synod yesterday by Mr T. M. Macdouald, of Invercargill, that the Hon. W. D. Stewart, legal adviser to the Otago Churchy and himself had independently arrived at the opinion that legislation was necessary before union could be effected between the Presbyterian churches. Another counsel in Dunedin had, he understood, expressed a similar view.

A gathering of tho passengers who arrived in Dunedin per George Canning on November 29, 1857, was held in the Union street School last evening. Mr J. G. Butler presided, and explained that the object was to arrange for a celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the passengers' arrival. Those present were constituted as a committee, with power to add to their number, and it was decided to hold a reunion on the 30th November.

A meeting of the Dunedin Horticultural Soo.iety'B Committee was held last evening, at which it was unanimously deoided to hold the forthcoming rose show in December for two days. Many people have expressed reBret that the society's shows were available for only ope day ; but as there is, of course, a considerable amount of labor attaohod to these exhibitions, it is hoped the now de. pasture will provo. satisfactory. A tender for new tables for the table deoorationa was accepted, and exhibitora are notified that they will be 7ft by 4ft in future

The residents of the north end of the City were treated to a unique entertainment at the Drill Hall last evening, this being a per* formance by Mr John Cougblan, the Irish piper, assisted by his daughter Maggie and a few amateurs. The hall was crowded. The Irish pipe is not in the least discordant, tho music drawn from it being full of tunefulness and melodious sweetness. Mr Coughlan played several seleotions, the best, perhaps, being a pretty march which he entitled ' Napoleon crossing the Alps,' and in each selection he proved himself a complete master of his instrument. Miss Maggie Coughlan gave a pretty exhibition of step dancing. The remainder of the programme consisted "of vocal solos, comic songs, and instrumental items, the following contributing:—Messrs Martinelli, M'Carthy, Nelson, Albert, and Galand. Mr R. Ingle officiated at the piano. Lord Rosmead, whose death is announced in our cablegrams, will be generally remembpred in thecolonies as Sir Hercules Robinson. He was born in 1824, being the second son of Captain Hercules Robinson ; held for } eirs a commission in the 87th Fusileers; retired from the service in 1846; and was employed in various capacities in the Civil Service in Ireland until 1852. Two years later he commenced his long career as a colonial governor, going from Hongkong to Ceylon, and then to New South Wales. In 1874 he accepted the cession of Fiji and hoisted the British flag, and for his services was created a Grand Cross of the Order of SS. Michael and Gewge. Iu 1878 he became Governor of New Zealand. He was appointed to the Cape in 1880, and three years later was sworn in as a Privy Councillor. He retired, after thirty-six years of uninterrupted service as a colonial governor in 1889, but under pressure consented to become Chief Commissioner of the Cape of Good Hope in 1895. For his services there ho was created Lord Rosmead in 1896. Sir Hercules was ono of New Zealand's most popular governors, and a particularly good speaker. To the sporting world he was known as part owner (with the Hon. G. M'Lean) of Lady Emma, Gorton, and Gitana.

The experiments in connection with the permanganate gold recovery process were concluded last night at the old Colonial Bank smelting rooms, when the "slimes" resulting from the past week's experimental work was smelted. One ounce eight pennyweights of chemically pure gold was returned. There were about 120 gentlemen present, who watched the smelting proceedings, and also the exhibition of the process which was carried on at the same time in the board room, with the closest attention. Dr Black was heartily congratulated by a number of his friends on the success of his discovery, and several of those present who had a knowledge of gold mining expressed themselves of the opinion that the process undoubtedly had a rosy future before it. In discussing the systems of gold recovery, one gentleman present mentioned that the cyanide had been a signal failure in one instance, to his knowledge, on Otago ores, when £9l in chemicals alone, exclusive of the plant, had been expended to recover £6B worth of gold. The experiments last night were conducted by Dr Black and Mr J. B. Smith in the board room, and Mr VV. Goodlet in the smelting room. The shares in the company taking over the permanga,-'. iiat.e gold recovery process are almost all applied for, and there will not likely be any further exhibition until it is shown in opera-\ tion after the full-aizud working plant is erected,

, The vital statiotics for October number • Births TO, deaths 56, marriages 30. For the «&me month of laat year the figures were : Births 111, deathss7, marriages 23. Messrs A. C. Begg, T. Brydone, and W. i! rid g man > lustioes, occupied tho bench at the Police Court this morning. Two first offonders and Richard James, Palmer were eaoh convicted of drunkenness and diEcharged; and another first offender, who did not appear, was mulcted in the sum of sa. The charge against George Hendrick, of attempting to commit suicide, was withdrawn, Sergeant O'Neill explaining that the man had been sent to the lunatic asylum.

The bark of the kamahi tree, which grows in abundance iu the Catlins district, is found to be very rich in tannin. About six months ago Mr Freyberg, the late Government timber expert,, forwarded samples of the bark to merchants in London, and he has just received* reply from one of them that the raw material is worth between £4 and £5 per ton, but in a concentrated form it would be saleable to tanners at from £ls to £2O per ton. Mr Freyberg says that as there is an almost unlimited supply of the bark in the Catlins district it would" pay the settlers to export it to Europe. The local forces of the Salvation Army have had a very successful "self-denial" period. If is interesting to know that the Army throughout New Zealand and Australia have.done so well in what appears to be the favorite Beason of Salvationists ; but it will be more interesting still to know the results of the home work. The Duntilin City bnneh raised £320, Dunedin south £OS, and Dunedin north £32, making a grand total for Dunedin of £407. The officer commanding at'Dowling street Barracks. | n reading out a number of figuies lat,t night, asserted that in his travels through the Austialasian colonies in the past twelve years he had not found a more benevolent . people than in Dunedin, and he conveyed his best thanks on behalf of the Army for all that had been given to the Army's funds through the self-denial season.

. Henry George's death is reported from America. He wa3 born in Philadelphia in 1839; went into a counting-house in 1853 and then to sea; in 1858 he reached California and became a printer, working at the case until 1866, when he was made a reporter and afterwards edited several papers, amongst them the 'San Francisco Times.' In 1880 he removed to New York and made that city his home. He will be remembered in history aa the apostle of the single tax doctrine, by which he aimed at abolishing all taxes for revenue purposes excepting a tax on the value of land, irresppotive of improvements. His chief work, • Progress and Poverty,' was published in 1879. Mr George vißited Great Britiin in 1881, in 1883, in 18S4, and in 1889, and in 1890 he came to Australia. In 1886, being nominated by the United Labor party for ihe mayoralty of New York, he polled 68,000 votes against the 90,000 of his Democratic opponent and 60,000 by the Republican candidate. In the Presbyterian Synod the discussion on article 3 of the basis of union wa3 continued throughout yesterday afternoon's sederunt. The amendment of the Rev. Jas. Clark making the strength of the United Assembly one-half the strength of all presbyteries and sessions was lost by a large majority. The Rev. A. M. Finlayson then moved as a further amendment tho deletion of the last clause of the motion and the substitution of the following words:—"The Synod of Otago and Southland shall continue as a provincial synod, Jiaving jurisdiction over the presbyteries and congregation? within its bounds and with supreme control in relation to the trust properties of the Church of Otago and Southland." The Rev. F. B. Fraser seconded the amendment. On the question being put the motion was carried as against the amendment by 50 to 40. At 6 p.m. the Synod adjourned until Mon day evening.

" M.B. A." sends five shillings to the Bracken fund.

Knox Church anniversary services will be held to-morrow.

The Alliance Lodge, 1.0. G.T., meet on Monday evening, at 7.30. Mr G. Lindsay, of Invercargill, will preach at Trinity "Wesleyan Church to-morrow evening. The North-east Valley Band will play contest and other selections in the Gardens to-morrow afternoon, weather permitting. A general meeting of shareholder of the Commercial Property and Finance Company, Limited, will he held on the 11th pros. Particulars are given in the supplement of the sports carnival and art union of the New Zealand Natives' Association at Wellington. The Otago Agricultural and Pastoral Society hold their summer show at Tahuna Park oh November 24 and 25. Entries dose on the 17th pros.

. An evangeliot of the Catholio Apostolic Ohuroh win deliver the fi>gfc of two addreßaes in the Oity Hall on Thursday evening. Particulars are advertised.

The Dunedin Burns Olub will hold their Halloween gathering in the City Hall on Monday evening, and there is likely to be a crowded attendance, The programme appears in this issue.

The anniversary services of Moray piaoe Con; gregationsl Church will be held to morrow. In the evening Mr Saunders will Bpeak on Hall Caine's • Christian.' Public meeting onTues lay evening.

The Kaikorai Band benefit at the City Hall this evening is «ure to be a draw, tiokets having sold freely. Mr Albert Lucib's company play a ' A Regular Fix,' and the band are to perform the contest pieces. The services at the Garrison Hall to-morrow will be conducted by the Rev. J. J. Lewis and tho Rev. W. "White. 'I know that my Re deemer live'th' will be sung by Miss Sears, with orchestral accompaniment.

The kinderspiel' Don Quixote,' recently performed in the North-east Valley Hall in connection with St. Martin's Church sale of work, is to be reproduced on November 3 in All Saints' Schoolroom with a concert programme. A limelight and musical entertairaent, in aid of St. Michael's Church building f anil, will be given in the Anderson Bay Sunday School Hall on Tuesday evening. Peninsula and Catlins pictures will be shown.

There is at present on view in the shop of Mr Frost, cf George street, a photographic shield, in commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee, of the Dunedin Post Office staff, numbering fiftyone. _ The Bhield contains a photo of each employe, and also a picture of the Tost Office.

The November number of the 'Triad' is early in the field, having come to hand to-day. The result of the recent £lO prize competition is announced in this issue, and we notice several Dunedin people are prize-winners. There are also a number of freßh competitions announced, which are both novel and interesting. Particulars appear in another column. The usual music supplement and a variety of illustrations help to make up a very interesting number, and-the numerous readers of the 'Triad' may well be satisfied with the value provided in the columns of our well-conducted contemporary.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1897., Issue 10458, 30 October 1897

Word Count
2,026

The Evening Star SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1897. Issue 10458, 30 October 1897

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