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ABOUT WOMEN.

Surprise weddings have taken place in Alabama. No one but those intimately concerned know the details. People take their seats, and at the proper place in the service the bride and the bridegroom rise from the midst of the congregation and approach the altar.

Mrs Allen Lemon is an applies; t for divorce at Anderson (Ind.)? Her case reveals something of a new hereditary mania of which she is a victim. Her great-grand-mother was divorced once, her grandmother once,, her mother three times, an aunt twice, a half-sister three times, and a fa 1 sister twice, although she is but twenty-six. A Devonshire lady of independent means recently died after spending nearly a life? time in bad. Thirty-nine years ajo she came to the conclusion that her bed was the most comfortable place in .the world, and decided upon remaining.there for the rest of her natural existence. From that day, although enjoying excellent health, she never got up again.

woman’s business CAPACITY. v The Duchess of Sutherland presidedrecently at a. meeting held in connection with the woman’s work section at the Victorian Era Exhibition, and. in opening the proceedings said she desired as much as anyone to see chances for her sex -to earn a livelihood taken up in the fullest manner possible. It was only during the reign of Victoria that woman’s work had been properly considered, but in the coming century the. next generation would see that the women of to-day had been true to themselves. It was not right that the weakest should go to the wall; she desired to make them strong, and strove to discover possibilities by which the mass of struggling womanhood could earn daily bread. Mias Cecil Gradwell then read a paper do * The Training of Women in Business.’ Men, she said, were accustomed in their early days to handle money and to oome into contact with business people, and therefore they .had an advantage over women, who had to, go through a specific training to be of any use in the world. The women who had prospered had-possessed great courage, tenacity of principle, and originality, but they undoubtedly owed some of their success to the fact that it was a novelty for their stx to work like men, afad therefore they met with a lenient public willing to excuse deficiencies. Now the novelty had worn off, and the woman who succeeded would be she who did ter work well. The lecturer had found that women with fortunes were generally possessed of large business knowledge, whereas those who had only a little money were at the mercy of unscrupulous advisers. Voluntary workers especially should have business knowledge. A few lessons in bookkeeping would be most useful to many lady hop, treasurers, and some knowledge of secretarial work would not be amiss to many lady bon. secretaries. Miss Gradwell urged women not to start typewriting establishments unless they were fully qualified by education for the work. It was a most risky venture. -Some women went into business who had never kept an account and were proud of the fact, and to others the law of supply and demand was “an unknown quantity.” Before starting as employers they should become assistants, for how could she command who could nob obey 1 The present Was woman’s opportunity. It was easier for her to get work than it was for her brother, and if she was trusted and worked harder, more earnestly* and, perhaps, more conscientiously than he did, she must prove herself equally competent to secure the same rateof ’ payment.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18971023.2.40.24

Bibliographic details

ABOUT WOMEN., Evening Star, Issue 10452, 23 October 1897, Supplement

Word Count
596

ABOUT WOMEN. Evening Star, Issue 10452, 23 October 1897, Supplement

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