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The Evening Star. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1897.

Tan result of the General Eleotion in Victoria must needs be a Viotartar!!"oen»rftl !? atter L of congratulation KlMtlon throughout Australasia, -indicating, as it does, that the heart of the people is sound at the core,_and that honest, careful administration is appreciated far beyond empty professions of democratic principles and the fantastic theories of Socialistic Radicalism. The policy of the Turner Government in practising rigid economy in every department of the public service, and equalising revenue and_ expenditure, has been the means of restoring confidence; and the veil of depression which for so long has hung over the colony has been lifted. In the commercial, trading, and business world the good effects of this policy are demonstrable in renewed activity and tbe revival of enterprise, in a bright spirit of hopefulness for the future, and—what is the surest test of all—the buoyancy of all descriptions of stock. These cheerful conditions will undoubtedly be maintained, intensified by the signal victory obtained by Sir George Turner, at the polls, and the endorsement thus of the principles enunciated on the eve of the election in his speech at St. Kilda. Especially notable has been the utter rout of the Parliamentary Labor party, who went solid against the Government. Not only did Mr Prexdergast and Mr Barrett lose their seats, but Mr Duncan Gillies, the ex - Agent - General, against whom a special set was made with characteristic virulence by the 'Age : and the Trade 3 Hall coterie, was elected for Toorak by a large majority. There is evidently a strong feeling in Victoria in favor of peace and quietness, Ministers having been supported by the constituencies in their determination to break with their quondam allies of the Labor Corner, whose special and mischievous demands have been either rejected outright or indefinitely postponed. The Protectionists have had a nasty knock in the rejection of their erstwhile leader, the venerable Sir Graham Berry, whilst Mr Murray Smith (the apostle of Freetrade) has been triumphantly returned. Mr Robert Harper, a very able and popular man, is among the rejected candidates, aud his defeat was presumably owing to his strong advocacy of the Bible in schools.

The address of Sir Geohge Turner to his constituents at St. Kilda, referred to above, was in reality a Ministerial manifesto, and dealt exhaustively with the more important questions of the day. In regard to finance, Sir George said that if the Government received one mandate at the last General Election which was stronger than any other it was that the national ledger should be balanced, and in accordance therewith during the last three years, iustead of living on borrowed capital and booming, the Government had been steadily retracing false steps, rectifying past errors, and ho believed laying down the foundations of solvency in the future. This year they had managed, not only to square the ledger, but to have a real actual surplus of £66,000. Their watchword, he declared, had been economy, and their watchword in the future would bo economy. " We are "determined only to expend what we can "afford,andnotwhatwe would wish. . " Our revenue is quite sufficient to meet " our expenditure, but this will continue

6nly so loDg as the Treasurer has "the support of the people of the colony "... Therefore I ask the people to "support the Treasurer in resisting any " demands for expenditure unless they are "Very reasonable indeed." Sir George, m view of the possible action of the Federal Parliament, which he regards as certain to be constituted, states explicitly that Ministers have no intention whatever of attempting or allowing any revision of the tariff during the next Parliament. "If " we get," he says, " intercolonial freetrade, " it.must be accompanied by a protective " tariff against the world." It is to be noted that be places the federation of the colonies in the forefront of his policy, and declares that, although ho is not at the present time altogether satisfied with" the draft Constitution, it is, in his opmi6n, based on fairly liberal lines, and-be has no doubt that at the next meeting of the Convention in January that Constitution will bo so amended as to get rid of the difficulties in regard to the relations of the two Houses and the referendum which now obstruct the final settlement. In respect to the immediate future, Sir George speaks with no uncertain voice. Ministers, he says, have had to carefully consider what course they ought to adopt —whether it was wise to put before the country "what is called a Radical programme," the result of which might be to pluuge the colony into turmoil and trouble, or whether a programme of peace and progress should be put forward. "We have " adopted the latter course, because we think ■" it to be in the best interests of our people " that we should have rest and quiet, and " therefore the proposals which I have to "lay before the country will neither be "novel nor startling." It will not- be necessary, he further says, to impose any additional taxation, and he hopes to be able to afford some relief bv gradual reduction of the income tax. Practically he throws over every plank of the Labor platform, except that which is common to all Liberals—the extension of the suffrage, which he purposes to assimilate to that in New Zealand—namely, one adult one vote, thus placing women oh a political equality with men. tt is perfectly absurd, he says, to stigmatise the grant of the franchise to Women as Socialistic legislation. The effect, he declares himself convinced, will be entirely in the opposite direction—an opinion, we may remark, which is borne out by more recent experience in this Colony. On the question of Bible-reading or Scriptural lessons in the State schools Sir George Turner takes a very determined stand, although neither one way nor the other does it, he says, form part of the Government programme. To grant the demands made by the party opposed to the purely secular system would practically, he affirms, be to "compel the teachers to teach religion to the people," and he objects in toto to the compromise suggested namely, the use of the Irish National Board reading books, " which are poor books even as reading books," and do not really give any Scriptural instruction at all. " Now, I say, if "we are to do any good to the children, "if we are to impress their minds on "religious questions, the teaching must be " doctrinal, and must be given bv persons "who have carefully studied and fully " understand the subject." To throw this duty on the State school teachers, who are of various faiths and denominations, would be, he considers, altogether irrational; and if, as in New South Wales, teachers were (as would be only equitable) protected by a conscience clause, the large majority would, he thought, decline to exercise such functions, and the country schools, of which there were 1,350 with only one teacher, would most likely be entirely unprovided for. "As to the large centres, "surely with our churches and Sunday "schools regular religious instructors "have full opportunities of imbuing the "minds of the rising generation with "sufficient Scriptural knowledge." This is the view we have always taken :" that the places for religious instruction are the homes, the churches, and the Sunday schools in connection therewith. There is no religious instruction, as Sir George very properly declares, of any value without the inculcation of doctrine, and such teaching is practically impossible in the State schools.

Our four-page supplement to-day contains an interesting artiole on the Cuban o*nv paign j chess, cyoling, and yaohting notes} parliamentary news, cablegrams, eto* Mr A. Sligo, M.H.R , has delayed his departure for Wellington until Tuesday. The Taviuni, at Auckland, brings news of the death of Tuknaho, the Tongan Minister of Lands, and one of the highest chiefs in those Islands.

The cablegrams report that Lord Eeher has resigned office as Master of the Rolls. He was appointed in 1883, in the place of the late Sir George Jessel, and is eightytwo years of age.

The new Vancouver service threatens powerful opposition to the San Francisco route. The cargo offered for the last two trips from the Canadian side of the Pacific far exceeded expectations. Both the Warrimoo and Aorangi had to shut out cargo at Vancouver.

Speaking at the meeting of the Fruitgrowers' Company, held' at Roxburgh, Mr Pennell said that October was the worst month for the fruit-growers to pass through, and as a preventive against the frost killing the young fruit he was putting pieces of scrim over all his trees. He had already tried the experiment on a small scale, and had found it work very satisfactorily. The evangelistic mission in the Caversham Baptist Church has been continued throughout the week. Mr Boreham was unable to take the meetings in the early part of the week on account of sickness in his family, but his place was supplied Ly the Rev. J. Muirhead, of Palmerßton North, who <Je"» livered faithful Gospel addresses. Mr Boreham was able to resume work on Thursday, and on that and the following evening preached two sermons. He wi 1 preach again on Sunday evening, when the missfoa will be closed.

The monthly meeting of the North-east Valley School Committee was held last evenibg, and attended by Messrs P. Thomson (chairman), Scoones, Calder, Rhodes, Stout, White,...and O'Shea. The headmaster's report for the quarter was read, as follows:—On the roll: Boys 265, girls 251; total, 516. Average: Boys 235, girls 217 ; total 452. Highest attendance on any half day: Boys 256, girls 247; total, 503. It was agreed that the chairman interview the head-master as to the frequency of half-holidays, and that the school should not be closed altogether on wet days, but that the infant class and first standard pupils should be allowed to go home on wet days at 1 p.m., the pupils in the other standards to remain the full time. It was decided to hold a meeting of the householders on Tuesday evening to consider the gymnasium question.

All Mr Bland Holt's productions give great scope for scenic effects and elegant costuming, and 'ln Sight of St. Paul's' is certainly no exception to this rule ; on the contrary, it serves to show to the best advantage the extensive resources of the company both mechanical and artistic. Although the cast includes more than a score of performers it is only jn the case of one or two of the minor parts that improvement could be suggested. All the leaders are excellently.-auited, Mr Baker, Mr A. Norman, Mr Brown, Mr Holt, Mrs Holt, Mibs Boss, and Miss Watson having strong parts, of which they make the most. Calls were given last night after several of the acts, the cleverly-w,orked and realistic fire scene in particular eliciting loud applause, though the ecene representing the exterior of the Aspasia Club, with real hansom cab driven by Mr Bland Ho'.t, ran it very close. The very large audience present last night were extremely pleased with what they saw and heard, and it is safe to say that this will be the case with every, body who patronises 'ln Sight of St. Paul's,'

The cycling season In Wellington opened to-day. ■'. _.,.;,:.; ',"•;.:' ■ :,\/.

One of the items in to-day's ciblegrams is that the British Army is to be increased by 11,000 men. According to the Army Estimates for 1896-97 the regular army of the United Kingdom, exclusive, of India, during the year ended March 31 \ 1897, was to eonsisb of a total-of 156;174 men of all ranks, this being an inorease of 771 over the previous year. The present increase, being larger than usual, is Bigoi Scant.

The monthly meeting of the Kensington School Committee, held on Tuesday evening, was attended by the following members:— Messrs Clark (chairman), Poddy, R. Wbyte, Nicholls, and Bridgman. Accounts amounting to £l6 Is lid were gassed for payment. Tue head-master -.'reported:-the .average attendance for. the past quarter as 338 ; roll number 380. In common with other school districts sickness interfered with the regularity, of the attendance. .The chairman prepared -plans and specifications for a fence, which the Committee decided to erect at the rear of the school.

A special meeting of the Albany street* School Committee was beld last evening to further consider the charge laid against Mr Spenoe (one of the/teachers), by Mr Connor, of unduly chastising one of his daughters.-. The members present were: Messrs A. T. Anderson (chairman), T. Walker (olerk), Thompson, Mathieson, Wilkinsori,. and G. J, Anderson. -* Mr D 7 H. Hastings wrote apologising for his absence. It was' decided to discuss the matter in committee. The following resolution was eventually parsed:—" The Committee have come to the conclusion, after hearing the evidence, that it does not bear out the charge of taking the child by the throat either in the class room or in the lobby, or of slapping her faoe, or of unduly punishing her; but the Committee think that Mr Spence was unnecessarily rough in pushing her into thelobby.". ;. n^.. Notwithstanding the boisterous weather the Kaikorai Presbyterian Church was well filled last night, when the cantata * Daniel' was repeated by the choir, under the conductorahip of Mr James Robertson. The principals went through their parts creditably, and the whole performance passed off with that smoothness and ease which showed that consistent practice had familiarised the performers with their work. The parts taken were as follow:—"Qtiee), Miss M. Laing; Sister, Miss J. Wright; Azwiah, Mr J. C. Laurensou ; Daniel, Mr A. Ross; King, Mr Ernest Bray. The trios and quartets were rendered by Messrs J. C Wilson, J. B. M'lntyre, A. Watson, J. Hunter, G. M'Millan, W. H. Hale, j. Armstrong, A. Ross, D. DuttoD, and Miss : K. Campnell. The soloists were Miss Brewer, Mr Armstrong, and Mr Dutton. The orchestra, controlled by Mr Richards, lent valuable assistance, and Miss M. Cullender played the organ accompaniments. The eantata was well received by the audience.

The Painters' Union meet on Monday evening.

Leith Lodge, 1.0.0. F., meet on Monday evening.

Mr David Scott is a candidate for the mayoralty of Roslyn. Some notices to members of the M.U.1.0.0.F. appear in this issue.

The Railway Department issues excursion tickets to Oamaru on the 21st inst.

At the Choral Hall, to-morrow evening Mr A Biunton will speak on Sunday schools. A meeting of the Workers' Political Committee will be held on Monday evening. At the Port Chalmers Sailers' Rest meetings will be held to-morrow- and on Tuesday.

A special meeting of the Chamber of Commerce will be held on Monday afternoon. The annual meeting of the Otago Lawn Tennis Club will be held next Saturday afternoon.

Otsgi Cycling Club hold a special general meeting in the olub rooms on.' Friday, 22nd, at 8 p.m.

A group meeting of the Christian Endeavor societies will be held in Trinity Wesleyan Schoolroom on Tuesday, evening. A public meeting will be held at Gibson's store, Woodhaugb, on Tuesday evening, when an address on the advantages of Oddfellowship will be given.

The Salvation Army announce that tornight, from five to ten, there is to-be a sale of work at tl e Dowling street Barracks, refreshments being provided. The monthly meeting of the Burns Club will be held in the City Hall on Wednesday evening, when the Rev. Isaac Jolly will deliver an addresp. "Halloween" will be held on the Ist November,

Should tbe ; weather prove favorable the Engineers' Band will give the first of a series of sacred concerts at "St. Clair "to-morrow afternoon ; the programme to be played- appears in our advertising columns.

On Monday and Tuesday evening next the Rev. J. J; Brown will appear at the City Hall in the capacity of a phrenologist. On Monday night the ptoooeds are to' be in aid of the Central Mission funds, and the Rev. J, N. Buttle will ocoupy the ehair. "". w lt is proposed to give a performanea of "The Messiah' at St. Paul's Cathedral about • phristraas week. Mr James Knox will be the conductor, and Mr W. B. Taylor the organ's*.- A notioe appears In another ooluma Inviting the ladles and gentlemen who assisted in a Similar performance two years ago to do bo ogain this year. Mr J. O. Butler, of the Un'on streetMool, Is working up a commendable idea—namely, to bring together, for a social evening's entertain* ment, the passengers and the descendants of passengers by the ship George Canning, which arrived in Port Chalmers from London "on the 30th November, 1857. A meeting is convened for the purpose of making preliminary arrangements.

The Rev. J. J. Brown, of Melbourne, delegate to the Wesleyan GSneral Conference, whibh Bits in Auckland next month, is passing throu»h Dunedin, and willpreaoh three times to-morrow in the Gar; fton Hall. Mr Brown has earned a reputation as a preacher, and lecturer. The orchestra will play afternoon and evening, and special attention is leing beatowed on the musical arrangements generally.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1897., Evening Star, Issue 10446, 16 October 1897

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2,827

The Evening Star. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1897. Evening Star, Issue 10446, 16 October 1897

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