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OVER THE CHESS BOARD.

[Conducted bt J. W. Mellob, B.Sc.)

Solution of Problem No. 240. - ’ Key move; Kt-Kt 2. ' I Thanks for enclosures. Your solutions are correct. . t

PROBLEM No. 241 -E. N. Frankenstein. Slack S piMoi.

White 3 vieces. White to play and mate in two moves.

THE MASTERS AT WORK. GAME XXI.

In the game submitted below Dr Tarrasch (while) tries a fresh opening. M. Tchigorin (black) did not, however, defend in his best style.

NOTES IN ‘ FIELD.’

a Inferior to .6 b-k 2; in fact, to this move may be described Black’s subsequent troubles. b Even now b-k 2 was belter, for he can no more prevent White’s Kt-K 5.

c Perhaps 9 r-k sq; 10 R-K sq, kt-q 2. followed by kt-b sq as a pis oiler was preferable. d To enable him to play 12 kt-k 5, and so to get rid of one of the dangerous Bishops, e The bishop had no prospect at kt sq except of taking off the Kt if he, plays to k 5; and thatproved subsequently to be anything but favorable: 13 b-r 3 was better.

/ Under no circumstances should he have taken the knight. g If 17 p-k kt 3; then 18 Q-R 6, followed by 19 Kt-B 3, and 20 Kt-Kt 5. hj 20 p x p would, eventually clear the diagonal of the QB also. i Bad. Taking the knight was imperative. J Well played. If 22‘ b-b G; then 23 Kt x R threatening Kt x Kt cb, thus winning. k With 22 r-b 2 he could have made a prolonged fight, but perhaps not save the game. The text move, of course, loses a Piece at once. I The knight cannot he saved, m If 20 bx b; then 27 Kt x B and wins, n The ending was played iu the doctor’s happiest style, but Tchigoriu gave him plenty of opportunities. ■

END GAME

In a Muzio gambit between MM. Steinilz (white) and Anderssen (black) the following position shows the arrangement of the pieces after Black’s nineteenth move:—

Black'lS pieces.

White IS pieces. White to play.

White now played 20 P x P, and ultimately the game was drawn. Prince Dadian of Mingrelie in ‘ La Strategic’ says that if instead of this he had played 20 P-K 6he should have won. Thus ; White. Black. White. Black. 20 P-K 6 R-Qsq-a 23 Q-QKtßchK-K 2 21 R-Q sq Kt-KKt35 24 B-Q Kt4ch R-Q 3 22 PxP ch Rx P 25 QxR ch ana mates next move.

NOTES. a If 20 pxp;2l BxK P, kt-kt 3; 22 B-K B 7 mate. 1f.20 b-q b sq; 21 Px P oh, bx p; 22 R-Q sq > £ V 9 .; i 3 B 'R «6> kt-q b3;24 Q x Kt. b x q; 2o K R-K sq ch and mates in two moves: if instead of 22 r-q sq, 22 kt-k b4; 23 R-Q 4 threatening R-K sq ch, followed by R-K 4 ch, 23 kt x r (If 23 q-k 2; 24 B-0 Kt 4. q-q tq: 25 R-K eq ch. kt-k 8; 28 Rx B and mates in a few moves): 24 R-K sq ch, kt-k 3; 23 Bx Kt and wins.

CHESS GOSSIP.

. The match Bird and Lee has concluded with a score of—Lee 6, Bird 4, drawn 2. It is noteworthy that in every game but one, whether as first or second player, Lee moved 1 P-Q 4. 2 P-K Kt 3 against Bird’s favorite P-K B 4 opening. The match has certainly had the effect of demonstrating the strength of this method of dealing with Bird’s characteristic manreuvre. The veteran Bird is not the man to ride his bobby horgo to death, and is indeed inclined to admit that the opening on which he has relied in so many memorable encounters is hardly trustworthy when opposed by this kind of strategy. In reviewing Gittin’s 1 Chess Bouquet ’ the ‘ Sporting and Dramatic News ’ refers to the British school of composers iu the following terms:—“ This school, recognising that the search for originality, after the mjriads of problems that have’been composed, is practically futile, devotes itself almost entirely to artistic elaboration. It blends two, or -perhaps three, themes in one position, making the piece or pieces, so to speak, convertible, at the same lime insisting on purity of mates, economy of means, and the absence of duals. Some difference of opinion still exists on (be last-mentioned, in connection with which it has always struck me that if a composer admits more than one method of arriving at the desired end he is either under the imputation of having no definite idea of the’ means that he wishes to employ or ho has not taken enough trouble to illustrate his idea in a striking and unmistakeable manner. Sometimes, however, he is allowed to cover his retreat with the phrase ‘minor variations.’

In the second 'of his volumes about * Siberia and the Exile System’ Mr George Kennan refers to the “ Soyots” as isolated, almost unknown, and leading a nomadio life iu the rugged mountainous regions of the Upper Yenesei. They had been described to him as the wildest, the fiercest, and the most savage of the Native tribes of the Northern Mongolia. But he found in the Minusinsk Museum .a set of their strange* looking chessmen,, “in which the bishops were double-humped Baclrian camels, and the pawns were-dogs and wolves,” and “they knew how to checkmate in three moves with a two-humped Bactrian camel,” £tc. He felt as if he, when he had ascertained that— among other things had been scraping acquaintance with a long-lost tribe of Asiatic cousins. He became quite impervious to any attempt to impress him with their wildness and ferocity. “Any tribe that could play backgammon, the Mongolian Jew's harp, and op-a a game of chess with a Khan’s double-burnped-Bactrian-Cdtnel’s dog gambit was high enough in the scale of civilisation to teach social accomplishments even to the Siberians. It is true that the S ;yols last year lay in wait for and capiuied the distinguished Finnish archaeologist, Professor.aspeliu, and held him for some lime a r p£isoner; but they may have done this htereiy as a means of getting him to teach thein some new Jew’s harp music, instruct them in Finnish backgammon, or show them the latest method of cornering a king with two camels and a dog/ A tribe that lives strictly according to Hoyle ought not to be called savage merely because it makes game of anArcbajilogist and acquires its science by.me ns of an ambuscade,”

The biggest pie ever made in England was, that cooked in honor of the Queen in 1887. It weighed more than 4,0001b, and was fully 10ft m diameter.

ouken's paws openi.m:. White. Black. White. Black. 1 P-Q ' P-Qh 17 Q-R 5 P-K R 3-v 2 P-K 3 3 B-Q 3 Kt-K B 3 P-Q 3 , 18 Q R-Q sq 19 Q-K 2 Q-Ksq Kt-Q B 4 4 Kt-K B 3 P-B 4 20 P x P B x P-/t 5 P-QKt3 Kt-B 3 21 Kt-B 4 Q-B 3-4 0 B-Kt 2 PxP-o 22 Kt-Q C-i <3 R-Q so-fe 7 PxP B-Q 3-ii 23 R-Q B sq P-K Kt \U S Castles Castles 24 P-Q Kt 4 B-B 6 9 Q Kt-Q 2 B-Q 2-c 25 Q-Q 2 , P-Kt 3 10 P-B 4 R-B sq 20 Px Kt Px J P 11 R-B sq B-B 5-it 27 Qx P R-Kt sq 12 R-K sq . Kt-K 2 28 B-K 4 R x B-m 13 P-Kt 3 B-Kt sq-e 29 B x Q Kt x B 14 Kc-K 5 B-B 3 30 Kt-K 4 B x Kt 15 B-Kt sq B x Kt-/ " 31 RxB-ii Resigns. W PxB Kt-Q 2

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18971009.2.31.21

Bibliographic details

OVER THE CHESS BOARD., Evening Star, Issue 10441, 9 October 1897, Supplement

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1,290

OVER THE CHESS BOARD. Evening Star, Issue 10441, 9 October 1897, Supplement

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