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LONDON GOSSIP.

[From Cub Special Correspondent.]

London, August 20.

SIR I3AAO HOLDEN. Sir Isaac Holden, who passed away last Friday in his ninety-first year, was a grand old Wesleyan of many inventions, quaint theories, and rigidly regular habits. If you desire longevity it is, 1 am convinced, the latter which matter. Whatever your regimen, whether it be ale and apple p e like Kir Tatton Sykes’s, or water and vegetables like Sir Isaac Pitman’s, or fruit and fresh air like Sir Isaac Holden’s, you must bold on to it strictly. Many of us are severe upon our--'selves in early life, but relax' after forty. Sir Isaac Holden, as I have mentioned, considered plenty of fruit and fresh.air indispensable. His rule (writes an old friend) was never, if he could help it, to spend lees than two bout's a day in the open air. When he entered his first situation he said to his employer that he would be glad to have an hour daily in the afternoon for a walk. If granted ne would not ask for any holiday, or would make up otherwise for the time so spent. This was agreed to. Sir lease took his daily walk, and to this, he used to say, he owed both health and fortune. He got his regular exercise, and as he walked he thought, thus continuing his self-education and ponderingo ver the problems of mechanical invention which he was afterwards to solve. In hia devotion to fresh air, as in everything' else, he was consistently logical. He was not one of those who inhale fresh air out of doors and forget all about the importance of it indoors. At Oak worth, bis Yorkshire home, the air everywhere in the house is completely changed each half-hour. In summer and winter alike the atmosphere is kept at a uniform temperature of GOdeg. He was always a great walker, and in order that his wife might take walking excercise in bad weather without going out he built bis famous winter garden, which is said to have cost £120,000. “This part of the house,” says a recent visitor, “ with its cosy nooks and waterfalls, is a revelation of tropical flowers and greenery. Sir Isaac delights to take his visitors into this beautiful retreat, and as they listen to the trickling of the water among the ferns and palms, he relates how the idea gradually grew upon him, and how he found a summer’s and winter’s recreation in watching and superintending its evolution.” “ I walked with. him,” records another visitor, “ over most of the seven miles of walks. It began to rain after we had left the house. Sir Isaac said ; ‘ The safest thing we can do is to keep on walking fast. Walking in rain is not dangerous if you can keep warm ; the danger is in sitting in wet clothes. You can take a Turkish bath when you return to the house. The Turkish bath ufeer a dueking prevents cold.’ ” Oakworth is one of the few private houses in this country which are fitted up with a Turkish bath. Sir Isaac was true to his belief in air and exercise to the last. He was out driving on the moors the day before he died. With regard to his diet, though he believed greatly in fruit, he was not a vegetarian. It was not meat, but bread from which he abstained. Like Wesley, whose ‘Natural Philosophy’ he studied when a boy, he saw in farinaceous food a thing to be avoided by tho elderly. “I take for my breakfast,” said Sir Isaac Holden a few years ago, “one baked apple, one orange, twenty grapes, and a biscuit made from bananas. My mid-day meal consists of about three ounces of beef or mutton, with now and again a half-cupful of soup. If I take a little fish, I take so much less of meat. For supper I practically repeat my breakfast menu." Tne orange was his favorite fruit. Wine he eschewed, but on returning from the House of Commons to Queen Anne’s Mansions ho had a tumbler of whisky and hot water before going to bed. Ho took no drink with hia food, and this obliged him to masticate well. Ho smoked two or three cigars a day, from which ho used to say that ho derived both comfort and benefit. The son of a collier, Holden was entirely a eelf-eduoatcd and solf-mada man- Tho majority of his most remunerative inventions were wool combing machinery, but ho also claimed to have discovered lucifer matches. Before a Select Committee of the House of Commons he related how he happened to hit on tho latter. “I began as an inventor on a very small seals, For what I know, I was the first inventor of luoifer matches, but it was the result of a happy thought. In the morning I used to get up at four o’clock in order to pursue, my studies, and I used at that time the flint and steel, in the use of which I found a very great inconvenience. I gave lectures in chemistry at the time at a very large academy.” Of course I knew, as other chemists did, the explosive material that was necessary in order to produce instantaneous lightbut it was very difficult to obtain a light on wood by that explosive material, and the idea occurred to me to put under the explosive mixture sulphur. I did that, and published it in ray next lecture, and showed it. There was a young man in the room whose father was a chemist in London, and he immediately wrote to his father about it, and shortly afterwards lucifer matches were issued to the world. I believe that was the first occasion that We had the present lucifer match, and it was one of those inventions that some people think ought not to be protected by a patent. I think that if all inventions were like that, or if we could distinguish one from the other, the principle might hold good. If all inventions were ascertained and carried out into practice with as much facility as in this case, no one would, perhaps, think of taking out a patent. I was urged to go and take out a patent immediately, but I thought it was so small a matter, and it cost me so little labor, that I did not think it proper to go and get a patent, otherwise I have no doubt it would have been very profitable.”

A ROYAL DUEL.

The duel with swords between that blatant poseur Prince Henri of Orleans and the Count of Turin ended rather less farcically than the usual run of such encounters in France. The Count, it is true, was only wounded in the regular manner— i.e., he had his hand scratched to blood-letting point—but the Prince is now laid on the broad of his back nursing a perforated “tummy.” As the wound is not likely to produce untoward consequences, one is inclined to ejaculate “Serve him right!” For le it understood Prince Henri is what one may justly term an “unlicked cub,” full of insolence and self-conceit, and quarrelsome to a degree. The duel, which took.place last Sunday morning at five o’clock, in the Bois Marchaux, near St. Cloud, was the outcome of the Prince’s rc flections upon the conduct of the Italian officers during the ill-starred Abyssinian campaign. Some of his statements in letters to ‘Le Figaro ’ were particularly offensive. On one occasion he wrote : “ An Italian of the highest rank is seized by the collar by an Abyssinian. The Europsan draws bis revolver. ‘Why should we kill each other ? ’ says the Abyssinian ; ‘ let ns embrace,’ wherupon the Italian pockets his revolver and embraces the Abyssinian, who takes him. Several Italian soldiers were captured by women. Humble in battle, many Italians tried to show themselves haughty in defeat. They made proposals which upset our ideas of honor.” The Prince further accused General Albertone of the grossest cowardice, and the captured Italian officers of abusing King Menelik’s hospitality in the most shameful manner. He was at once challenged by a dozen Italian officers, including the Count and General Albertone, and, confident of his powers-as a swordsman, blithely accepted ' the lqt,

The meeting with the Count of Turin had to be arranged very eatafnlly, for the duel was most objectionable to "the relatives of both parties, who ace connected by marriage, and. the French and Italian Governments had determined to prevent the meeting. The Count, however, travelled to Paris, and, though the: Hotel: Continental, at which he put up, and Prince Henri’sresidenoe were closely watched, the principals and their-sedonds managed to slip off to St. Cloud and get through the business without interruption. The duel .began at five o’clock,'Count Lcontieff for the Prince and -Colonel Qnento for the Count acting alternately as umpires during the four-minute bouts. The first assault was not exciting, both men being very cautiom, but at the expiry of three minutes-, the Count managed to take the skin off bis antagonist’s shoulder, so the medicos intervened. As • the wound was the merest superficial scratch the combat proceeeded. The ; second encounter was marked by some rapid play, but neither man suffered any damage. In the ensuing meeting, however, the Prince got his own back by pinking the back of the Count’s band, and shortly got home a fierce lunge at his opponent’s breadbasket. Luckily for the Count, the sword E dint landed fair.aud square.in the hollow of a a Won situate, as the French'papers politely put it, “ near the waist.” The force of the thrust considerably disturbed the Count’s breathing for a few seconds,: and spoilt the alignment of the Prince’s blade. He resumed the conflict with a fresh sword, and a wild fight ensued. . Both ' men--attacked with impetuosity, but their thrusts were wild, and the only result of the encounter was a visible and audible want of breath on the part of Prince and Count at the end of the, . set-to. The fifth bout was sharp and decisive. Prince Henri- began, in a cautions fashion, but after a conplebof feints instituted a wild raid upon bid-adversary. Taken aback for the moment by the rapidity and vim'of his opponent’s, attack, the Count narrowly escaped being spitted through the lungs. He, however, followed his parry with a thrust, and the Prince, who bad nearly overbalanced himself in his attack, received the point of his adversary’s sword in the lower abdomen. The Prince at once dropped hia sword, and the fight was over. An examination of the wound proved that it was not dangerous, and, Dr. Toupet having bandaged the sore spot, the Prince was taken homo and put to bed. Before leaving the_“ field of honor ” the principals of course “ kissed and made friends.” When tho Prince recovers he will have to fight General Albsrtoue, for that much alligned officer has sworn to save his blood even if he has to resign his commission in order to procure a meeting.

The combatants, by the way, are both well known in European Court circles. Prince Henri Phillippe Marie D’Orleans, the eldest son of the Duo De Chartres, was born at Richmond, Surrey, on October 15, 1867. He is an impulsive young gentleman, and hia unbridled tongue is for ever getting him into hot water. He has travelled through Central Asia and Abyssinia, having as a companion the well-known explorer, M. Gabriel Bonvalot, with whom he, as a matter of course, quarrelled. Prince Henri never loses an opportunity of stirring up French animosity against the land of his birth. England is his bugbear; he sees “ perfidious Albion” at work in Siam, in Abyssinia, ever thwarting French interests. His utterances about this country have always been tinged, not merely with animosity, but with contempt, and with a perfidiy surprising in a prinoo whose family for half a century have sought and found the most generous welcome it it. It is averred that the lachrymosl glands of Prince Henri are very easily excited, and in his Asian tour he was apt to collapse from fatigue.“ M. Bonvalot, who had often to carry him on his back, has stated that bo would have had far less trouble with, a. delicate woman, Jealousy was nt ; the bottom of the differ enoea between the Prince and M. Bonvalot, The latter did the work, and repeatedly, when in Asia, risked his life to preserve that of the Prince. When, they got homo Henri annexed all the glory. There is a groat deal of the “ fumisto ” about Prince Henri, and Frenchmen do not take him seriously. Tho Count of Turin is the grandson of King Victor Emmanuel, being the second son of the late Prinoo Amedeo of Savoy. His elder brother, the Duke of Aosta, is married to a cousin of Prince Henri, and this fact rendered the duel decidedly objectionable to the heads* of the different families. Although the Count of Turin is twenty-six years of age and a major in the Cavalier!a Roma, he still continues to be treated as a ward by his uncle, King Humcert.- The fact is, the Count has, not unjustly, gained a reputation for being a young man brimming over with spirits, and not always easy to keep within the limits of that outward reserve and moderation prescribed for princes of a royal family, and he is wofully extravagant. But what causes King Humbert alarm is less the lavish expenditure of the Prince than the tales that go abroad of daring exploits performed in the company of gay companions, and-the stories of fair members of Italy’s aristocracy whose heads have been turned by the young man. No prince of tho blood, however, is more popular with the Italian people. His figure and bearing are certainly all that popular fancy could desire in a prince, and his affability and open-handedness are such as attract affection and esteem.

TELEPATHY AND TRAGEDY.

That telepathic eommunicatious with intelligent spooks, such as Mr Stead’s “Julia,” are enjoyable enough when conducted with what the “good man’’calls “ docent reserve ” may be true enough, but occasionally it appears ns though the ghostly folk misbehaved sadly. For instance, the family of Ernest Milliner, a highly respectable chartered accountant and novelist, grew greatly distressed when, inspired by Mr Stead’s successes, he embraced Theosophy, and entered upon a course of telepathic communication with spooks who, in the flesh, would have been highly improper persons. These degraded, lost, and, let us hope, fried or frying souls mado shocking mischief between Mr Milliner and the wife of his bosom, and finally persuaded the former he was heir to the throne.. Milliner thereon lodged documents with magistrates, etc., of such a startling character that they said he was insane, and cruelly incarcerated him in thecountyasylum. Recently the poor fellow was released, not being considered mad enough to detain, and on Friday he ended matters by blowing out his brains. The police, after describing the finding of the body, said there were a large number of remarkable documents in the deceased gentleman’s bedroom. The first was “ an appeal for Royal mandate for a Royal court of inquiry, investigation, and judgment upon a matter of dignity to the monarchy and commonweal of the realm of Great Britain and Ireland,” This sec out a claim of the deceased gentleman as the rightful heir-apparent to the throne, the circumstances connected with which claim, tho deceased stated, had been communicated to him by means of telepathy. The document, a very long one, was written on foolscap paper in the legal style, and appended were the names of two witnesses;— To Victoria, Monarch-Apparent.—Take notice of this appeal, made according to constitutional law, and a copy of which has been despatched to the Speaker of the House of Commons, for attachment without the building of the House of Parli - ment, for publication to tie commonwi a , that I, Ernest Milliner, member of the Incorporated Society of Accountants, and of the Theosophical Society of the World, know by the process of mental telepathy that it is said by many of tho nations that the present monarch reigning is not the true monarch, but another person is.

The document continued to set out matters purporting to show that this belief had been extending, and proceeded ;

In February, 1855,1 diet remember that I had lived before, and so did many others; and in proof of this I do refer to the publication nf Borderland’ in October, 1894, and January, 1817, which publications are now issued by Mr \V. T. Stead, editor of the ‘Review of Reviews’; and also I do refer to the publication known ns the ‘ Review of Reviews,' all of which have in the past given instructions of mental telepathy existing between persons living upon this world. Also I refer as proof to the publications of the Theosophical Society, letters from the society to me. from Mr Sinnett to me, and from the Theosophical Society of India to me, bearing out the existence of mental telepathy. And I do say that others have said in my presence that they remember living before. About the end of March, 1895, there did arise a conspiracy against mo of many persons of religion and - politics by reason of mental telepathy, being greatly established by myself, and by reason also of allegations being made by others than myself that I was the true heir to the throne of this realm. Therefore was there a conspiracy to place me, while I was suffering from influenza in the bouse of my supposed mother at Bolton, into an asylum for the insane with the object of causing my death from shock. (Here follows a long explanation of the deceased’s removal to an asylum, and his subsequent action against the Commissioners in Lunacy, which was stopped by Mr Justice Kennedy in Chambers in London, stating that his certificates of insanity were valid.) . . . B'o I called upon the persons responsible at this Royal Court of Inquiry to produce for the Commissioners in Lunacy all the documents connected with ray incarceration, as I do say that because of the knowledge of mine, by means of mental telepathy, that I was heir to the throne of Britain. I was falsely accused. The document then related how the deceased make known through the Press that he had lived before, and bow, by mental telepathy, he had been able to warn the Government of a contemplated Fenian outrage during the Jubilee celebrations. After requesting that this should be fully investigated by the Royal Court of Inquiry, it proceeded But I do say that the main question of inquiry and judgment is whether the allegation is true or not in whole or part, that I am the true heir to the throne of this realm by reason of the change of monarch about the year ISfil, when, the present monarch apparent (crowned in 1837) did abdicate in favor of a woman truly entitled to the throne, which woman is said to have given birth to myself.

The deceased had also left a long written statement addressed to the coroner of Southport. In this statement he expressed great indignation at the action of several local persons, including the chief of police at Manchester, for getting him confined in the Cheadle Lunatic Asylum, and ascribed it to their knowledge that he was the heir to the throne. He also gave tiio names and addresses of several Southport and Manchester persons, who, he said, had told him they had had a previous existence. The statement contained the following ;

I have been refused offices in Manchester, and terribly insulted by reason of telepathy. There has been a system of boycotting played on me because of the spite of many and my knowledge of their past lives.

He also complained of alleged persecution by Sir Charles Russell “ for political motives by reason of mental telepathy Madame Sarah Grand, Mr Grant Allen, Cardinal Vaughan, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Pope, “because of religious feeling.”

The laist remarkable document the deceased left was his will, in which he stated that he desired to be cremated. The opening sentences of the will were : I have not signed this will because the change I have taken is not the change called “death” of ordinary people. las “ Apofya ” am well known as an occultist. The change that will occur when 1 am cremated is simply that I cast off my Botla, astra, syka, and I have remaining the subsau, subsin, and true soul. I shall live about and continue to do my- work. It is possible that 1 may return by a process of materialisation which 1 can direct, and with Nature bring about. But this depends whether the nation desires me to rule or not. It is true I am an extraordinaiy man. I desire to bo cremated with 71b of saltpetre, lib of charcoal, and jib of brimstone, and no religious ceremony.

BARK EXTRACT FROM NEW /BARASH.

A parcel of bark was sent to Mr Phillip Mennell, of the ‘ British Australasian,’ from New Zealand some time ago by some person or persons unknown. As there were no instructions with the parcel Mr Mcnaell promptly sent the bark to Messrs Bbntcher, Mortimer, and Co., of Bermondsey, for inspection. The result of their examination is expressed thus The sample you sent us appears to be dry extract of mimosa bark, ami to contain less tannin than is usual for this material. Some years ago we received a very considerable quantity 0 f mimosa extract in theliouul state from Australia Imt prices fell so that'the factories hud to be closed. Since that time there has been a contmuous fall in the price of extracts of all descriptions, and we have not heard of any mimosa extract being shipped. We do not think you would find this a lucrative business. It is impossible to give you the exact percentage of tannin contained in your sample without havinga chemical analysis made, the cost of which would be £2 2s.

This brief communication will have a particular interest for Mr James Frey berg, who, I notice, is “ up in the stirrups ” over a new process for concentrating tanning materials for export from the colony. Possibly, indeotl, it was ho who sent the package, ami it so it would seem that ho has hardly digcovered a gold mine in tho process ho has patented; But Mr Freyberg is used to disappointments, and nothing seems to affect for long hia ultra-optimistic view of the future of New Zealand’s timber and bye* products trade. Some day perhaps he will consent to recognise the fact*that the value of an “ inexhaustible supply ” of any product depends entirely upon the demand for it at prices which will pay the producers. It will, I know, grieve Mr Freyberg to hear that Victoria street, Westminster, the scene of his whole-hearted lal os in the cause of New Zealand timbers, and once wood paved from end to end, is now an arid asphalt desert. And I may mention that Vestries in other parts of London are replacing wood with the evil-smelling compound (when hot) in which Messrs Simmer deal. Presumably it has been found less costly than wood. From a sanitary point of view asphalt is certainly superior to timber, and small repairs upon roads so paved can be effected much more expeditiously—a matter of no small importance in the main thoroughfares of the City of London.

A CHEAT THIRST.

Is there no one in your part of the world who can lower the record of Dr Mooney of Bennington, Kentucky? This audacious boaster had actually the hardihood—in the face of the known “ nobblerising ” capacity of many gifted Australians—to aver that he is the “champion whisky drinker of the world.” The doctor claims that he has for fifty years averaged over twenty drinks of whisky daily, a grand total of 365,000 drinks. If there was one gill at each drink, ho has consumed 91,250 pints, or 45,625 quarts, or 11,406 gallons. This amount of liquor would fill 181 hogsheads. Fine and large isn’t, it ? No doubt, however, as soon as these figures reach the Antipodes they will be beaten. Advance Australia'! Britannia rules the vjaves ! Don’t let us be wiped out in the matter of whisky by a mere Mooney. The doctor, one ought perhaps to add, does not nowadays enjoy the best of health. ■

the rev. hj. r. haweis’s latest.

Our mutual friend the Rev. H. R. Haweis is gnashing his teeth over the indifference of the public with reference to the recent finds of Messrs Grenfell and Hunt in Egypt. These remarkable discoveries (including the alleged new logia of Christ) are now on*view at the University College, London, but, despite the fact that the exhibition is free' very few folks are going to see-it. Mr Haweis found the curator wringing his hands and saying : It is most heartrending to think that every year thousands of mule loads of precious relics amongst them papyri, whole archives of first second, and third century Greek and Homan Christian literature—ire simply being carted off as rubbish and used as manure. If instead of £2,001) now subscribed by England and America the civilised world would give £50,000 a year to the work, and give it now, what might not he discovered ! But in fifty years, when probably the money will be forthcoming over and over again, it will be too late, and wo shall have to pay in excess for small returns—any fragments that may be gathered up—as for the .Sibylline Books. ? e * ac .l 1 the soil of these rare rubbish heaps where lie these treasures is so valued for certain saline properties that in a short time it will be all gone m manure now so much attention is being given to agricultural development in Egypt. These reflections greatly moved Mr Haweis. Says ho :

The whole thing Hashed upon me as 1 glanced ronno, and my eye caught the famous brown papyrus with the eight New Sayings of Jesus Ghnst, which probably date back to 110 ad Here .we have actually a specimen of the raw material from which the. Evangelists constructed the Gospel. How many more of,the Lord’s words might not be recovered-St. Paul’s lost Epistles the Egyptian Gospel, the Hebrew Gospel—ali lost—and many other records contemporary with Christ and His Apostles. Close by the Sayings on the same table were lying bits of

Trajan's and Hadrian’s Edicts, fragments of the Odyssey, fragments of Marcus Aurelius. What happened was this. Books and parchments as they were out were copied and recopied in those days, and periodically old MSS. were carted away or basketed away—for the baskets remain, and are still used for porterage—the MSS. superficially burned, and left amidst the sand heaps which have so 'marvellously pYeserved them for us. In one day thirty-six bafcketsful of MSS.,'in another twenty-five, were found. Many of these are now at Oxford being deciphered : 150 of the finest rolls remain at Cairo. Flourishing Roman cities in Egypt, like Oxyrhynchns in the first and second centuries, were great centres of Christianity as well as of Pagan culture. Is it not possible to excite the imagination of Cape millionaires or Westrnlian Midases to win for themselves imperishable names by working in a field which is ready to restore to us the marvels of the first and second centuries, where the finds are so certain and so rich. Of course it is not only whole archives of ancient literature that may be lying there to be catted away for manure, but other priceless relics. Statuettes in wood, one exquisitely finished and perfect, a nude negress in ebony. 1400 n.c.; copper vessels and perfect jars of Oriental alabaster, 4000 and 5000 u.c.; necklaces and strings of jewels in superb variety and patterns—daily filched and scattered incontinently ! Not the least extraordinary find is the clean, white Egyptian linen, thousands of years before Christ, as sound as the day on which it was woven, perfectly preserved in sarcophagi.

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Bibliographic details

LONDON GOSSIP., Evening Star, Issue 10441, 9 October 1897

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LONDON GOSSIP. Evening Star, Issue 10441, 9 October 1897

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