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The Evening Star SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1897.

Whatever may have been the intentions of the Prime Minister in Awunia siting up the Committee Seat. of Privileges in the matter of the Awarua seat and in securing a substantial Ministerial majority on that Committee, it is evident that, having fathomed public opiqion, he has, with characteristic sagacity, thought it host to allow the case to be treated on the merits. The report brought up yesterday will, wo think, be accepted generally with approval, since the course recommended will not only definitely and_ finally settle the question immediately at issue namely, the eligibility or otherwise of Mr Ward to retain his seat—but will prevent the possibility of the recurrence of any similar complication. The Committee unanimously recommend that the question as to whether under the existing law the seat for Awarua is vacant should be referred to the Court of Appeal, which will be in session next week. No delay will, therefore, be entailed, provided that the necessary Bill is passed by both Houses as a matter of urgency, as it should be. It is amusing to note that Mr Seddon, having been forced to abandon the idea of maintaining Mr Ward in bis seat by a purely party report of the Privileges Committee, now claims to have approved from the outset of the reference of the matter to a judicial tribunal. Now, this course was not only suggested by the Opposition, but was really the point upon which the division of September 30 was taken, when Ministers brought up all their forces, and carried the motion for their packed Committee by nine votes. Mr Polleston, speaking in the debate as to the manner of appointing the Committee, thus expressed himself: “There is another “course, which I think would be a fair “ one if it could be brought about, and “ that is the reference of this question to a “judicial tribunal—that is to say, to one “ or two of the Judges. That is a course “ which might well be taken.” Mr Scobie Mackenzie immediately followed, stating that he rose for the purpose of saying that “all the methods which had “been suggested for the solution of “ this matter appeared to him unsatis- “ factory, except the one thrown out by “the honorable member for Eiccarton—“namely, that the question should be “referred to a judicial tribunal.” Mr Seddon having interjected that there was nothing to prevent the Committee from recommending that course, Mr Mackenzie declared that, if it would be well for the Committee, after perhaps a fortnight’s deliberation, to recommend that course, it would be better that the House should recommend it at once. “This is a “disagreeable and difficult subject for “the House, and I feel satisfied that “it would be more satisfactory to the “honorable gentleman immediately concerned, to this House, and to the “country if the question at issue were “remitted to a proper judicial tribunal.” Party, he went on to say, had got many advantages—solid advantages—which are not always recognised ; “ but there is one “ thing which it is absolutely fatal to—- “ namely, the judicial spirit.” The honorable gentleman proceeded to point out that there was nothing novel in the course proposed. In the Mother Country the Crown has statutory power to refer to fho Judicial Committee of the Privy Council not only anything connected with a disputed election, l»ut any abstract question of law. In Canada the Supreme Court has by statute, according to Bourinot, an appellant jurisdiction in the case of controverted elections, and the Governor-in-Council may refer any matter to this Court for an opinion. «In certi-

' fymg their opinion the judges d 6 not give their reasons, 'blit foll'dw in this respect the practice ’if the judicial Comthittee 6f. the Privy Council of ringiand whfch dealing with cases referred ’to the Crown for their advice.” y 3 to this practice Mr Mackenzie quoted from Todd’s ‘ Parliamentary' Government. “ The Judicial Committee of the I rivy Council, in addition to the ordinary ‘ functions as a Court of Appeal from deci- “ sions of the Courts of Law, is emoy section 4 of Act 3 and william IV., c. 41, to consider any ‘matters whatever that the Sovereign “shall think fit to refer to it.”.

Wo defer for the present reviewing the other recommendations of the Privileges Committee. The matter of immediate interest is the position of Mb Ward in regard to the Atvarila seat. It is only common justice to that honorable gentleman to state that it has all along been his desire that the question, which has been the subject of so much controversy, should be tested on its legal merits by a proper judicial tribunal. Ho can hardly be blamed, pending such a decision, for asserting the right of his constituency to representation in the House by the man of their choice, unquestionably legally elected. AVo have never been able ourselves to understand how there could be any doubt as to the interpretation of section 130 of the Electoral Act, 1893, which declares that the seat of any member who is an uncertifioated bankrupt is ipso facto vacant. But differences of opinion among legal experts do exist, and the decision of the Court of Appeal will give us an authoritative interpretation of the statute.

With this number we issue a four-page supplement. The Press Association advise us that the Moana’s mail, which left Auckland on September 4, arrived at London on October 6, the clue date.

Messrs J, P. Jones and H. A. Reynolds, justices, presided at the Police Court this morning, when a first offender was convicted of drunkenness and discharged. David Morris, charged with being drunk and disorderly in Walker street, was sent tenced to seven days* imprisonment. The excursion train to Hyde will start on Labor Day at half-pastteno’clock forenoon instead of forty minutes past seven, as formerly arranged. The change has been made by the railway authorities for the purpose of enabling voters lo record their votes prior to going to the excursion. Many persons who had arranged to go picnicking, etc., on Labor Day will also be enabled to vote and have their day’s pleasure as well. The railway authorities have exercised a wise discretion,

_ The results of the recent nursing examination under the auspices of the St. John Ambulance Association are just to hand. The following have passed Mrs R. g. Allan, Geo. Calder, Chisman, Harrison Jones, Misses E. Apstein, O. E. Burton, L. Burton, R. Brunton, H. Cormie, E. Davies, L. Davies, Groves, A. Hay, M. S. Henderson, Isabella Hitchcock, E. Johnston, Morgan, A. Mattheson, J. MTntosh, J. Simpson, L. Simpson, E. Sherriff, E, Wood, E. H. Wood. The tnhaion which has been conducted during the week in the Caverabam Baptist Church by the Rev. F. W. Boreham, of Mosgiel, has been very successful. The church has been well filled night after night, and the addresses, which have been of a very practical and helpful nature, have been attentively listened to. There have been a good number of inquirers during the week. The pastor and deacons met at the close of the meeting last night and decided to continue the mission another week, Mr Boreham having consented to give his services. A three-roomed wooden cottage, owned by John Ellis, contractor, of Look-out Point, and occupied by his employes, was destroyed by fire at about ten o’clock last night. At the time of the outbreak all the men, with the exception of Frederick Hollard, who was in bed asleep, were absent at work. Mr Ellis was the first to notice the flames, and he succeeded in wakening Hollard just in time to escape for his life. The men’s clothing and effects were all destroyed, and they are heavy losers by the fire, which is supposed to have originated by a spark from an open fireplace. The place was uninsured, and the .property destroyed is estimated at about £2o. Mr Ellis’s own residence, which is situated close by, was only saved by the timely effoita of the Caversham Fire Brigade and other willing hands. Four mounted cavalry corps go into camp at Tahuna Park to-day. The Canterbury Yeomanry (thirty-one strong) and the Mounted Rifles (forty strong) arrived in town this morning by the special mail train from Christchurch, and .proceeded during the forenoon to the Park, where Colonel Webb had completed all arrangements. The North Otago Mounted Rifles arrive by this evening’s train, and during the evening the Otago Hussars will make their way to the Park. The camp, which is under the charge of Captain Coleman, of the Wellington Depot, is to last for a week, and it is expected that there will be between 130 and 200 men under canvas. This number would have been much larger but for the fact that the time of the year chosen by the authorities is unsuitable for the men in the country districts, and also that only eight days’ notice of the date fixed was given. Mr John Goughian, who, no doubt, is well known by many people in this colony as an Irish piper of some fame, made his reappearance here at Naumann’s Hal), South Dunedin, last evening, after an absence of fourteen years. Since Mr Coughlan’s last visit to this City he has played before Her Majesty the Queen and many of the Royal Family, and for some time past he has been in Australia, where he has appeared with Mr Harry Rickards, Mr George Rignold, Miss Maggie Moore, and several others. He is unquestionably an adept on his favorite instrument, and judging by his remarks last evening Irish pipes are a great rarity nowadays. Unlike the bagpipes, they arejnot blown by the mouth, the wind being supplied by a bellows, which is kept under the right arm. Mr Goughian played a number of sweet airs on his pipes to the evident delight of the audience, who greeted his efforts with loud and continued applause. Mr Goughian is accompanied by his daughter Maggie, who proved herself to be a dancer of the highest order. She danced a sand jig and Irish jig in capital style, and also contributed a Highland fling to the music of Piper M ‘Kechnie. Mr Goughian will probably give another entertainment in town at some future time, and, if he should do so, he is almost certain to draw a bumper house, as many Irish people would undoubtedly be very glad of the opportunity of hearing him on their national instrument, which is fast going out of date.

The 3.30 car from town to Mornington yesterday met with a rather peculiar mishap just above the Queen’s Drive crossing. What happened was that the “ kicker ” the contrivance for keeping the wire rope down when the car is going up any steep portion of the line —by some means got jammed, and, instead of automatically yielding to the gripper, it remained firm, thus causing the car to be brought to a very sudden stop. The front seat of the dummy was occupied by three ladies—Mesdamea R. Holgate, sen., Marks, and Bowden who were by _ the force of the concussion thrown against the front, shattering the glass and receiving numerous flesh wounds about their faces. Mrs Holgate was the most seriously injured, her face being very badly cut in several places. The driver, Mr Louden, also got a nasty cut over the right eye by being thrown forward on to the iron gripper. Dr Macpherson was a passenger on the car, and attended to the injuries. Both car and dummy had a full complement of passengers, but, with the exception of those mentioned, no one else was hurt. The exact cause of tfao unfortunate occurrence is a mystery, and can only be accounted for by the supposition that the kicker was blocked by some obstruction getting into it either by accident or design. At all events the previous car passed the same point without anything being observed to give rise to any suspicion, everything at that time being all right.

It cannot be too well known that Slesinger’s Eheumatio Balsam is no qnapk remedy. It is an old and tried specific for rheumatism) sciatica etc.—[Advt.]

retailers keep 'Wednesday as a full holi•■I Mr j,, E. White ■will be a candidate for the mayoralty of North-east Valley. : , ♦ A special meeting of the Dnnedin Painters’ Union will be held on Monday evening. A poll will be taken on Tuesday for the vacant counoillorship of South Ward, Cavereham.

Mr J. Mathieson, of Sandy mount, has forwarded 12s 6d towards the Children’s Ward.

An opening organ recital will be given in the North Dunedin Presbvterian Church on Friday evening.

The Hon. J. G. Ward will give n political address at the Agricultural Hall on Tuesday evening. •

The anniversary services of the Hanover street Baptist Sunday School will be held tomorrow.- . , Candidates for,examination by the Board of Examiners of tho Royal College of Music are informed that applications close on the 27th Irist.

The Railway Department have delayed the excursion train to Hyde on Tuesday until 10.50 a.m. On Thursday the early north train wiU reach Oamaru at 12.3(X A public meeting in Connection with the Theosophical Society will held on Monday evening, at their rooms, when Mr Maurais will deliver an address on ‘ Caste.’ The installation of Bro. P. Ansdell asW.M. of Lodge Otago, No, 7, will take place on Wednesday evening. Metnbeis of Lodges Hiram and Maori are requested to attend.

A meeting of the Labor Day Committee will be held on Monday evening. Applications for side shows in connection with the Labor Day sports must be made by 7.30 p.m. on Monday. Mr Charles Watt preaches in the Tabernacle, King street, to-morrow evening, on ‘God’s Work in Man’s Redemption,’ when a collection will be taken up on behalf of the Prisoner*’ Aid Society.

. The services to-nlorrow at the Central Mission, Garrison Hall, will be in connection with the Wesleyan Home Mission. Miss M'Kerrow will sing “I he better laud/ with orchestral accompaniment.

In connection with the anniversary of the Wesley Church, Cargill road, a soiree will be held on Tuesday evening, to be followed by a public meeting, when addresses and musical selections will be given.

At the meeting of the Otago Institute on Tuesday, Hie 12th, three papers will be read by Mr Hamilton, and members of the Dunedin Field Club will communicate the results of recent investigations on the local flora.

The sacred cantata 'Daniel' will be repeated at the Kaikorai Presbyterian Church on Friday evening. In addition several solos are promised by city vocalists. A reduced charge is to be made. Particulars appear in this issue. The proprietor of the Victoria Warm Salt Water Baths is benefiting by the Milburn Cement Company working double shifts. He is getting a steady flow of warm salt water from six in the morning till eight in the evening, instead of from eight till five as formerly. The services at the King street Congregational Church to-morrow will not only celebrate the anniversary of the Sunday school, but also mark the advent of the Rev. G. Heighway to the pastorate of the church. Owing to the election the tea meeting will be held on Thursday and not Wednesday, as previously announced. The sale of work and concert in connection with Pioneer Lodge, 1.G.G.T., will be held in the Choral Hall on Tuesday evening next, and, as it has been in hand for some weeks past, all who go cm rely on a good night’s entertainment. There will be all sorts of side shows, and the programme includes selections from Hutton’s Orchestra and Mr George Dickie in : hia ventriloquial performance. As admission, is only sixpence we expect to see a bumper house on this occasion.

The Salvation Army, Dowling street, have got notified elsewhere a very extensiva programme of meetings, which arc announced as a mission week aeries. A limelight service is announced for to-morrow night, at 7 o’clock. There Is an exhibition on Monday ; Tuesday night, the children of the Army are to render a concert; Wednesday, hosanna service and coffee supper; Thursday, the Cargill road choir will render the Army a musical evening (the Rev. T. G. Brooke presiding); for Friday, the Gipsy Jingle Band are announced. From Monday to Friday (inclusive) the Army are having prayer meetings at six o’clock in the morning. The meetings on week evenings commence at eight o’clock.

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1897., Evening Star, Issue 10441, 9 October 1897

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The Evening Star SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1897. Evening Star, Issue 10441, 9 October 1897

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