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THE RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT AUCKLAND.

AUCKLAND, October 6. The taking of evidence at the inquest closed to day. Andrew Howardson, the driver of the engine, said in the course of his evidence that from the time of the start until he shut off he did not receive any signal whatever, and neither saw nor heard one. He obeyed every regulation. There were no speed recorders on the engine, but at the time of the collision he thought she was going from five to seven miles an hour, though he was not sure to a mile either way. He could see the crossing thirty yards off. He saw the signalman on the crossing when going to the station to his train. He commenced driving on the Wednesday before the accident. As the crossing was within the station limits he thought one whistle sufficient. Intermittent whistling might frighten horses ana cause an accident. He thought the crossing perfectly safe for all ordinary traffic, and was almost sure that sufficient precautions were taken. He did not observe a light, and never saw the bus. He had been sixteen years in the railway service, and had been driving since 1890. AN EXONERATING VERDICT. October 7. The jury returned a verdict of “Aceh dental death.” They exonerated the bus driver and the railway officials.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18971007.2.20

Bibliographic details

THE RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT AUCKLAND., Evening Star, Issue 10439, 7 October 1897

Word Count
219

THE RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT AUCKLAND. Evening Star, Issue 10439, 7 October 1897

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