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The Evening Star THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1897.

The Brindisi mail, which left Sydney on August 23 per Massilia, arrived in London on the night of the 26th inst., three days before time.

Mr Percy Smith, Surveyor-General, returned by the Upoln from a holiday trip to Tahiti and Rarotonga. He stayed a mouth at each place. As a result of his visit and investigations he considers it proved beyond doubt that the Maoris of New Zealand originally came from the islands of Raratea, Bayatua, and Tuhau, in the Society Group. Bis full report, to appear in the journal * Polynesia/ will contain much valuable informatiop,

The Albert Lucas Company gave another performance of ‘Nob Such a Fool Us He Looks ’ at the City Hall last rfight before a numerous audience. The company go on' tour next week-, and tvfll rocpen again on October 28.

The Telegraph Department advises us as follows—The Berne station notifies an interruption of the Hongkong-Macao cable. The Bhamo station advises that the Bhamo route to China is interrupted beyond the British frontier between Manwhybe and Timgynek-Aokge.

The New Plymouth folk are agitating for the release of Wallath, the New Plymouth highwayman, whose parents have promised to bo responsible for his future good behaviour, but the Minister of Justice holds out very little hope of the request being complied with.

The following “ gem ” is preserved in the annual report of Inspectors Bindon and Milne, which has just been laid on the table of the House Paraphrasing has somewhat improved, but it is still very weak. The pupils will not endeavor to get a thorough grasp of the meaning of the verses. In a verse on the ‘ Well of St. Keyne,’ in which the line “He laid on the water a spell” occurs, over half a class of twenty-four pupils took the word “spell” to mean a “ rest,” and we were confronted with such an explanation as “Ho laid (sic) on the water for a rest.”

The usual monthly meeting of the Dunedin corps of the St. John Ambulance Brigade was held iu the Fire Brigade Station on Tuesday evening. There was a full attendance of the members, and nine new members were proposed. The hon. surgeon (Dr Gloss) delivered a lecture on ‘The Blood, Hemorrhage, and First-aid Treatment.’ At the close of the lecture a hearty vote of thanks to the lecturer Was, proposed by the first officer (Mr Barclay). Those who have passed their first-aid examinations are eligible for membership in this corps, and can procure any information from the hon. Secretary (J. E. Bone). ‘Armenia, or the ‘Crescent Against the Cross,’ was the title Of the lecture delivered by Mr A. M. Ludbrook in the Tabernacle last evening. The lecturer gave a graphic account of the horrors perpetrated by the obnoxious Turk and his allies the Kurds—a fierce tribe of hillmen living in a mountainous district between Turkey and Persia, who delighted in robbery, murder, and outrage. About 100,000 Armenians had perished by the hands of these remorseless fiends, who would never voluntarily desist till they had wiped out the whole race. The lecture was listened to attentively by a small but appreciative audience, and the limelight views by Which the speaker’s remarks were illustrated were received with approval.

A concert was given in the Cargill road Mission Hall last evening by tho members of the Junior Endeavor Society, in charge of the superintendents—Misses A. Cole and A. Rainsford. The Rev. T. G. Brooke occupied the chair, and the hall was comfortably filled. The pro-ramme consisted of recitations, songs, etc., by the members, assisted by Misses Swan, Shepherd, Palmer, and Clarke, Messrs Craig and Brooke. A dialogue entitled ‘ Wanted, a General Servant,’ was also given by Misses M'Corkindale, Lewis, Rainsford, and Cole, Miss Palmer played the organ accompaniments, and the children were trained by Mr T. Woods. The concert was in aid of the new organ, which will now be free from debt.

This is from the ‘ Tablet ’: —“ Just before his death, we are glad to be able to say, at his own urgent request, Dr Fergusson was received into the Catholic Church. Ho had been much struck in attending Dr Moran with the calm and peaceful way in which the bishop met his death, and in the course of friendly chat tho latter had more than once put his hand on the doctor’s shoulder and said, in his kindly way: ‘ Ah, doctor, doctor, it’s a grand thing to be a Catholic.’ This, and the quiet but persuasive influence of a devoted Catholic wife combined to bring him the light of faith, and on the day of his death he was formally received into the church by the Rev. Father Murphy, who also administered the last rites of our holy faith.”

Concerning Pomahaka the Tapanui ‘Courier’ says editorially It is no use Government turning off the present settlers at Pomahaka with the idea of getting others in their place, and they had therefore better face the inevitable and reduce the rents before their tenants are starved off tho place. Pomahaka should never have been taken by tho Minister of Lands for close settlement, as it is not in any way suitable, and plenty of better properties adjacent to the railways could have been obtained at the same money. There is very little doubt but that the Hon. John M‘Kenzie was wilfully deceived about this property by interestecl parties, and now the country will havo to pay a large amount of money out of tho general revenue to recoup the loss on the estate,”

Some theatregoers profess to caro nothing for tho sensational dramas now so much in favor, but we feel aure all must admire tho thorough workmanship and good all-round merit displayed in Mr Holt's most recent venture, ‘One of the Beat.’ There ia nothing outrageously improbable in the plot—such events might easily occur, and the natural acting of the different players gives the impression that they really are occurring. The comic business stands out rather more prominently than usual in this kind of play, and Mr and Mrs Holt, of course, make the most of tho chance thus given them. The stage management is excellent, and compares favorably with anything yet shown us by this company. ‘ One of the Best' is to be performed for only two more nights, and as the management announce that no piece will be repeated a strong recommendation is made to those who have not already attended to go either tonight or to-morrow.

Mr Hogg brought forward at the Wellington Education Board a series of resolutions in connection with the appointment of teachers’ committees. He said they were liable to be humiliated, and the Board could always act in an arbitrary way. He moved teachers the Board shall take into consideration (I) capacity and skill, (2) literary attainment, (3) term of service, (4) adaptability for the vacant position, special consideration to be given to teachers who have done good work in remote parts of the district ; that communicating with a member of the Board should disqualify any candidate ; that a committee of selection be set up, and that the Board should submit to the School Committee the whole of the applications for a position and invite it to make a selection.” Most of the members were strongly opposed to binding themselves down to these rules, partly because the Board had always been guided by the principles laid down in them, and they were nothing new, and partly because they found themselves better able to avoid friction through not being tied down in this way. The resolutions met with little favor, and were all withdrawn or lost.

The Union Company inform us that the usual excursions to the West Coast Sounds will be made in January next, and in all probability their splendid new steamer Waikare will be made use of to run these trips, and if anything were needed to add to their popularity the employment of the Waikare should do it. She is particularly well adapted for the Sounds trips, having an unusually large number of deck cabins and splendid accommodation below. The first excursion will be despatched from Dunedin about the 19 th or 20th January, and the second ten days later. In addition to these trips, however, it has been arranged to run a special excursion to the Sounds for the benefit of school teachers, a very large number of whom are expected to assemble in Dunedin to attend the Conference of teachers to be held bn 4th January. One of the smaller steamers of the company will be employed, and she will take a run through the Sounds, spending a day in Milford Sound to permit of excursionists visiting the Sutherland Falls. The trip will be on a less elaborate scale than the usual excursions, and the time occupied will be from five to six days. The price has been fixed at the moderate figure of £6, to suit the circumstances of those in whose interests the excursion has been arranged. The steamer will probably leave Dunedin on Tuesday, 28th December, allowing her to get back in time for the opening of the Conference. ,

fhe filrffinkVy meeting of the Port Chalmers Literary and Rebating Society was held on Monday, when Mr A. Bauchop read a very able paper on the New Zealand ”. 3 king laws. The paper was favorably oriticised, Mr Bauchop .being.accorded a hearty vote of thanks. We understand it is intended to have the essay printed. Mr justice Denniston held 0 sitting in jCharObera at Dunedin yesterday before leaving by the afternoon train for Oatnaru on his way to Timaru. Probate was granted re Emily H. Mills (Mr Holmes applying), David Smeaton (Mr Woodhouse), H. S. Fish (Mr Sinclair), and A. J. Fergusson (Mr Callaway); in respect to the Bank of New Zealand v. Walter Guthrie and Co., Mr Sim applying, the Registrar was given liberty to certify the result of the inquiry as to debenture-holders’ claims; in regard to a deed between Robert and Elizabeth Hunter and Matthew Todd, on Mr Woodhouse’s motion an order was made vesting lands in J. Cochrane and W. Cowan; re Guthrie and another v. Grice, Sumner, and Co., Mr Sim applying, leave was given to serve writ out of the colony; on the motion of Mr Woodhouse an order to administer the real and personal estate of Angus C. M‘Kay was granted to the Public Trustee ; and on the application of Mr Sim a draft order was settled authorising’ the receiver in the estate of W. Guthrie and Co. to divide and deal with the sum of £20,000 now in hand.

Mr A. Sligo announces that he is a candidate for the vacant City seat. A meeting of the Political Woikers’ Committee will be held lathe trades Hall to-morrow evening.

. The bakers notify that biread will be raised in price per 41b loaf ift Dunedin and suburbs On and after Friday. The farewell social to Bro, F. A. Hincook by the 1.0.0. F. Lodges will be held to-morrow 'evening in the Albany street Hall. . The returning officer for the City of Dunedin gives in this issue particulars re the forthcoming election for the vacant scat.

A notice to members of the Dunedin Cycling Club appears in this issue in reference to the opening of the cycling season. A large number is expected to attend.

This week’s ‘ Democrat ’ cohtaihs cartoon on local topics, special musib supplement, cdntaib’>ng music by F. Leech to Kbdyard Kipling’s ‘Recessional Poem,’ sketches Bland Holt’s ‘ Derby Winner,’ sporting, ladies’ gossip, cycling, music and dramatic, Tasmania inquiry, Captain Robin’s dinner.— [Advt.]

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1897., Evening Star, Issue 10433, 30 September 1897

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The Evening Star THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1897. Evening Star, Issue 10433, 30 September 1897

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