Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE MINES BEFORE.

[From Odr Parliamentary Reporter.}

WELLINGTON, September 29

The Mines report, laid on the table this p.fiernoon, states that the total production of gold and silver during 1890 Was 358,001(Z, representing the value of £1.052,017, or a decrease in value of £129,829 compared with the preceding year. The quantity of gold entered for exportation through the Customs for the year ended March 31 last was 256,9130z, representing a value of £1,015,742, while the quantity exported during the same period of the preceding year was 302,690.-z, valued at £1,196,081. The report, slates that in the future treatment of quartz for extracting gold the new plants erected on the different fields will be in a marked degree superior to those formerly in use. The adoption of labor-saving appliances, stonebreakers, elevators, and self-acting feeders for mills, the concentration of tailings, etc., and the improvements in the methods of dealing with refractory ores will be the means of reducing the cost of extracting gold and silver from the ore. Mr Cadman says, in conclusion : “ I would point out that the impetus given to mining operations through the introduction of capital has been shown in the increased number of mines injvhich prospecting and development work are being carried on, and in pursuance of which extensive mining and milling machinery has been erected. A number of special claims are now taken up for quartz and alluvial mining in both new and previously worked ground, and the attention devoted to prospecting gives hope for believing that additional exploration within auriferous areas will result in the discovery of quartzreefsandof alluvial gravel deposits containing gold in such quantities as will enable them to be profitably worked. The stream of capital for mining investment that first set in in the Northern districts is being directed to the Aliddle Island, and, without being over sanguine, I think it can be reasonably expected that the interest taken in mining throughout New Zealand will continue to increase, that many new mines will be discovered, and that our mineral resources will be developed in such a manner as to ensure steady yields from mines, with highly profitable returns for shareholders. The construction of roads and tracks for opening up new fields and also for improving the means of communication in older districts is a matter of urgent necessity, and ample provision must again be made for the vigorous continuance of the necessary works in order to aid the further development of the industrj'. Substantial grants will also be required for prospecting, water conservation, and deeplevel mining. The continuance of the mining piosperity will result iu employment being found for miners and the country being further opened up for the prospector, thus adding in a substantial manner to the advancement of other industries, which will be conducive in a marked degree to the progress and prosperity of tie colony generally.”

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18970929.2.27

Bibliographic details

THE MINES BEFORE., Evening Star, Issue 10432, 29 September 1897

Word Count
477

THE MINES BEFORE. Evening Star, Issue 10432, 29 September 1897

Working