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DEEP-SEA FISHING.

’ *0 THE EDITOR. BIB,— Me Thomson deserves our thanks for drawing attention to this nil-important question. _ But is the desire to incubate a few English fish only, or one for promoting a better supply of our own, for the poor and noh alike ? Opinions, ffom practical men would be valuable, say, Captain Densemand others, who have, been engaged in trawling along pur opastb. Wp. are teeming with excellent fish; but, owing to the want of a market, the middlemen regulate the supply and demand. A steam trawler is necessary, so that she may enter habors in all weathers. Mr Andrew Thomson, of Port Chalmers, should also, as well as our numeral 13 hard-working fisherman, give theirs. The writer can speak with some experience of the peculiar migratory habits of the fish near the islands of various parts of Australia and New Zealand, but not with the authority of our local fishermen. Fish and potatoes is an excellent nourishing food (experience has taught him), but owing to the want, of a market the poor cannot derive the benefit of this healthy dietetic. Our filthy sewage is no doubt; one of the factors for driving away that succulent of all fish, the flounder.—l am, etc., ' Groper. Dunedin, September 28.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18970928.2.30.1

Bibliographic details

DEEP-SEA FISHING., Evening Star, Issue 10431, 28 September 1897

Word Count
209

DEEP-SEA FISHING. Evening Star, Issue 10431, 28 September 1897

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