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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

The following handicaps have been declared by Mr Henry for the Hawke’s Bay meeting ; October Handicap,- one mile and a distance: Acone 8. Lb Shrew 8.11, Artist S 7, Pompom 8 1, Defhyiee 8 0, Boreas SO, New Forest 7-13, Msjtyrdom 7.10, Douglas 7.10, Tire 7-8. ApcfrSs7.S, Missfire 7 4, Man-o-war 7 4, Ca-ur De Lion C, 10. Corinthian one mile and a-quarter: Tally-ho s>§vl.|bipgan 11.5. Leontine 11,2, Rainbow 11.2 To Ngaehe 10,10, dour 10.8, Heavenly Iwy 10.5, Garrison 10 0, Harmony Grip 10.0, lukaimai 10.6. Day Star was to be today in company with Mr L. team, with a view to his New Zealand c'-p engagement. An Auckland commission has been effected j l ji aVor * or tee New Zealand Cup at 100 to 4 and 100 to 5. 1 ROWING. The boating season at Wellington was opened an Saturday by the Governor, but owing to a nasty choppy sea which prevailed the usual procession of boats had to be curtailed, as the lighter craft could not be launched. CRICKET. The Moruington Cricket Club opened the season on Saturday afternoon with a match President v. Vice-president. There was a large attendance of members, over forty taking part in the game. There was also a large attendance of spectators, and there is no doubt that the M.C.C. has tho support of the residents of the district. The Vicepresident's side batted first, and put together 56 runs. The President’s side responded with sl2 (Gregory 16. Williamson 12, and Livingstone fa). Several new members took pact in the match, J. Howison, Whalen, Johnstone, and Williamson shaping splendidly. Since the formation of the club a marked improvement in the play of the members has been noticeable, and from all appearances the club should give a good account of itself the present season. In the bowling department Marks, Garside, Macfarlane, Hobbs, and Lowry obtained good averages. The Canterbury Cricket Association on Saturday decided to recommend the New Zealand Cricket Council to arrange a North and South Island match.

The University Cricket Club have elected office-bearers for the current season President, Dr Scott; vice-presidents—Drs Shand, Gloss, and Barnett; captain. Mr J, Fitzgerald ; deputy-captain, Mr E. H. Williams ; practice captains, Messrs A. R. Falconer and J. M. Nicholson ; treasurer, Mr A. J. Crawford ; secretary, Mr S. A. Moore ; Committee—Messrs W. E. Gibson, J. H. Neil, J. O’Shea, E. J. M‘Ara, and L. Thompson; Match Committee—Messrs A. R. Falconer, J. M. Nicholson, E. H. WilHams, J. O’Shea; delegate to the Cricketers’ Association, Mr A. R Barclay.

FOOTBALL. The match between a team chosen from the Kaikorai and Pirates Clubs for the benefit of two players who were disabled on the field two months age, was played on the Caledonian (Mound on Saturday afternoon, and attracted a large number of spectators, Neither of the teams played up to anything like first-class form, and at times the game resolved itself into a mere farce. This was probably due to many of the players being fairly out of condition. Early in the first spell Mason, who, with M'Ara, were the best backs on the ground, passed the ball to Stephenson, from whom it went to Fell, who, after a dodgy run, sent it back to Stephenson, and the latter scored. Stewart failed with the kick. ...The Combined team continued to press their opponents. Ross, taking a pass from M'Ara, ran in behind the poets, and Mason kicked a goal. In the second spell Duncan came on in place of Wood, and his presence had a good effect on his team, who, although they made repeated attacks on their opponents’ line, were unable to score, and the game resulted in a win for the Combined team by 8, points to nil.' Mr D. Torrance was referee. A Wellington message stairs that an Association football team from England are expected to visit the colonies next season. An Auckland telegram states that the Tukapa football team from Taranaki defeated the Ponsonby Seniors by l‘i points to 3, r

Saints oefeated St. John’s 09 the Asylum Ground by 6 points to nothing. For the winners‘G. Uteley scored a try and kicked a penalty goal Mr P. Boyd as referee gave every satisfaction.

THE \V£UJ\f;TOX-OTAC:O MATCH. f’om a letter written to the ‘Post’ by Mr J. F. M. Fra set wc make the following extracts:—Beyond holding an honorary position in a local football club I have no connection with the football authorities her?. I have, however, some slight knowledge cf Rugby football, and have also in my day seen a good deal of athletics of every kind, and the latter experience I now find usefi .1 in my present criticism. I saw the Wellington - Otago football match from stait an d I frankly admit that tic Wellington forwards were a fine body of dashing players. I will admit that I pelieve that they could beat our forwards in a fair and sportsmanlike “go,” although our backs were admittedly superior to tbeirr. The Wellington forwards, however, from the start of the game apparently deliberately set themselves the unsportsmanlike task of “knocking out” the Dunedin forwards and backs by rough and brutal play. Time and again these tactics were apparent, and the ire of the onlookers was roused by the fact that our men (who are not accustomed to the license given by Mr Garrard), with some slight exception, did not retaliate. Therein, I think, they erred. Directly the Dunedin captain saw the tactics that were being adopted he should have taken the only course open to him, and let his men play the same rough game in self-defence. As I have said, the crowd—as might have been expected of any crowd—resented the oue-sided roughness of the game, and their temper was not improved by the tricky and off-side game played by Wellington. Now, it may be that this is the kind of foothad played in Wellington. Judging by the bitter criticisms of the Southland Press, it is their usual game while on circuit; but it must be home in mind that violence can only be met with violence, and if such tactics are to be allowed on the football field football will not be a pretty game to look at. Our players down this way are willing enough, have the same physique, and the same courage. If it was necessary they could easily hold the Wellington men—probably the list of casualties would be the same oa both aides—but that is not football, and it is but a short step thence to the inclusion of professional pugp lists and Grtcco-Roman wrestlers. One of the latter class, fit and clever, could have disabled half the Wellington team in the first twenty minutes without the referee knowing how it was done. Thus it will be seen that the “hospital” gams opei s up groat and very objectionable possibilities. The referee must take his full share of blame; he was adjudged weak and inefficient by belter judges than I am. If his ideas of off-side play are correct, all our Southern referees are at fault. If rough and brutal play on a football ground is an offence, he evidently is unaware of the rule. I feel in a measure sorry for the Wellington men ; they played an undoubtedly hard, although not a sportsmanlike game, and they have been severely, but justly, rapped over the knuckles for an exhibition that they could easily have avoided, and which was quite unworthy of them.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18970927.2.4

Bibliographic details

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE., Evening Star, Issue 10430, 27 September 1897

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1,243

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE. Evening Star, Issue 10430, 27 September 1897

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