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OUR LONDON LETTER.

AKGLO-COLONIAL NOTES. LoxDox, August 7. THE niGHT HON. BICUAKD. As he was the Grst of ihe Australasian Premiers to arrive, Mr Seddon was the last to leave, and it says much for his cleverness that he managed to go out—like a Roman candle—with a highly effective splutter. Those who simply heard what Mr Chamberlain calls hia "booming eloquence" at the big public banquets probably don't think eo. They no doubt are amongst those to whom he referred on Saturday evening. " Many," remarked the right, hon. gentiemau, "say of me as they do of the fly in amber, how the. devil did he. fjtt there'/ Weil (he added amidst roars, of laughter), it sometimes puzzles me myself." Later, Mr Ssddon told

us of a friend (or was it a political opponent) in New Zealand who observed to hitn before leaving : " Whatever you do, Dick, keep your mouth shut." Again we laug'ied, but this time a little ruefully. How much better in some ways it would have been, I for one reflected, if the Premier could have taken this excellent advice. Of course, he must have talked,'but the talk we wanted was what he gave us on Saturday— i &., simple, shrewd, unadulterated "Dick" Seddon, not booming eloquence. Certainly, the Premier never showed to greater advantage than at this valedictory dinner, which was given by him to his Prees and other friends at the Hotel Cecil on Saturday evening. At ten o'clock, when he with-

drew to pack, after leading ' Auld lang syne' with immense fervor, one eminent journalist after another went up and congratulated the right hon. gentleman on his speech. Not that the matter was much, but the manner was admirable. He wanted, Mr Seddon said blufUy, to say " Good-bye " to a number of friends whom he couldn t en 11 on individually; and to them to dinner, after the New Zealand fashion, seemed the simplest plan. To the objection that iu the colonies the parting guest* receives, and not gives, a " send-olf," Mr Ssdilon cheerily replied that here we were upside down, "in the speech which he made in proposing the toast of the Queen he boie strong testimony once more to the impression made upon him by the Jubilee, and the universal sentiments of loyalty and patriotism invoked. Mr Losles, M.P., iu proposing Mr Seddon'a health, cited the remark of a Shoreditch constituent, that Mr Seddon was a "stunner." "I might add," continued Mr Lowles, "an eighteen-stoner." But the Premier's most sympathetic moment came when, after the genhl gibes against hhmelf already quoted, he bold us of his last farewell to Sir George Grey. There was no booming elcqueccc here. In simple language and with hushed voice Mr Seddon related ;iow, barely an hour previously, he had bidden " Good-bye : ' to the Grand Old Man

whose splendid life was fast ebViing'aw&y in a darkened room at South Kensington. That have been au impressive moment to the nisi) so full of vitality aud energy himself. Small wonder that he seemed considerably moved. Sir George, he said, was extremely weak, and.he feared he must very soon go hence. But his old friend, thank God ! had known him. More than that, he had sent his regards to the people of New Zealand, winding up v.ilh the prayer "and m:;y Gxi keep you iu hi* cafe." Aud in bidding us of the Mother Country farewell, as he presently did, the Premier "with some emotion rcne-iip'" /?'«• HwroA i.-y»;<-o n . , ■■--I'liouan a small galnering, Mr becW'on'a diimer party was a notable one. London editors included Mr E. T. Cook, Mr Massingham, Mr Kinloch Cook, Mr Spender, and sundry finaucial scribes, whilst amongst the Anglo-colonists I noted Mr Cunningham, Mr Collius Lsvev, Mr Taylor, Mr A. S. Pvtthbone, Mr Phillip Menceil, Mr Cecil Leys, Mr 11. B. Marriott Watson, etc., etc., The Agent-General was represented by Me Walter Kennaway, Mr Jame3 Huddarb and Mr "Clutha" Mackenzie acted vice-chair, men, and Father Lynch eaid grace. Mr Seddon'a colossal and indefatigable) powers aa a worker have amsmd all thoso with whom he haa come in eontaot. What the average Premier went through during the past Eix weeks would have knocked up any mau of ordinary physique, and Mr Seddon doubled the ordinary Premier's work. Sometimes he had seven hours' sleep in the tweuty-four, but oftcner six or less. In short, he tried to do, and did do, too much. Dozens of persons had access to him who might have been dismissed with a, polite letter or dealt with by his private secretary or by the Agent-General's department. But Mr Seddon saw them all. As a result he became at last almost inaccessible even to persons with really important claims on his attention, and the Press particularly suffered sadly. I fancy he knew this, and that it was (amongst other things) with the idea of smoothing

down possibly rufiled feeling 3 that the right hon. gentleman gave Saturday's dinner. If Mr Seddon comes to grief as a politician it will be because he's too absolutely selfconfident and determined to play a lone hand. He never asks or takes advice. Had he consulted almost any dispassionate person as to the status of Mr Lowles, M.P., he would not have allowed that fluent and astute gentleman to utilise him throughout the visit as he did. At the dinner on Saturday I was, I confess, amazed to see on the right and left of the chair not (as one expected) the editors cf the 'Daily News' and ' Daily Chronicle,' but—Mr Lowles and Sir Somers Vine !

It must be admitted that Mr Seddon scored one over the other Australasian Premiers by achieving a private audience with the Pope. He owed the interview, of course, purely to accident. Had he come Home via Italy the right hon. gentleman would not, in all probability, have got nearer the sacred presence than Mr Reid, Mr Kingston, and Chief Justice Way. But since May last colonial Premiers have loomed and " boomed" uncommonly large in Europe. Even the Italian pipers have been full of their doing 3. The Pope's Advisers, amongst others, hid heard much of them, and when Mr Seddon arrived on the scene they were glad to show hitn some attention.

The mtmo. which Sir We3tby .Perceval drew up suggesting various improvements in the positions of the AgentE-Gencral has been carefully pigeou-holed, and will share the fate of most of the proposals ventilated at the Jubilee Conferences. The Conserva tive papers, without being able to deny the awkward fact, are very cross with the Liberals for averring that the meetings at the Colonial Office ended in smoke. Nothing patently piaeiicsl may, they say, have as yet eventuated, but the gain in good feeling and so forth was enormous. One writer, however, clearly much stung by Radical taunts, calmly declares that if, indeed, nothing was done at the Conferences, this was due to the attitude of Mr Reid and Mr Kingston, who had made up their minds beforehand not to commit themselves in any way.

Mr Townend, the London correspondent of the 'Argus,' having failed to interest the. Prince of Wales in his grievances against the Imperial Institute, ha 3 given the correspondence auent his exclusion from the historic banquet at South Kensington to the Home papers. These express themselves in various keys of horror ancnt the atrocity. The ' Daily Mail,' by way of doing the thing thoroughly, states that Mr Towneud repreEents over a thousand newspapers in Australia and New Zealand, and hints thatsnubbing an ' Argus' man may have petrifying resulta. Personally I should sympathise more keenly with Mr Townend'a raortf-

fieatlon if the correspondence did not make it painfully evident that he had been " playing a lone hand "in the matter. It was not the exclusion of the colonial Press generally which angered him. Whether '* the writers" (as he politely designates other correspondents) got in or not obviously struck him as of no importance whatever. The shocking fact was that an ' Argus' man and a cable agent should have been excluded. The truth is, of course, that no esprit de corps exists between Anglo-colonial Pressmen. If there were, any insults such as the Imperial Institute's would be impossible. Mr Townond's threat not to cable a word about the banquet obviously failed altogether to cow Sir Alfred Jephson. Probably he reflected that the matter could wait. If one correspondent did not mention it, another would. Why fuss? Had, however, the entire colonial Press vowed to boycott the banqnet, the situation would have been widely different. Sir Alfred might not have liked that. To lose half a dozen words of cablegram did not in all probability striko him a3 an irreparable disaster, but to have the affair absolutely ignored all round would be nasty. The ' Argus' is a great paper, and its representatives very properly consider themselves great men. Occasionally, unfortunately, some benighted Briton fails to recognise the patent fact. Sir Alfred Jephson (misguided man) treated Mr Towneud precisely as he did the rest of us who demanded tickets. 1 make no attempt to "excuse him. It was abominable. To confound an 'Argus' representative and a cable man with a mere writer for the 'Age' or the Sydney ' Telegraph' or the j Dunedin !! ! No wonder poor Mr ! Townend's feelings overcame him ! '. ! isisnoi' cown:. I met the Primate of New Zealand by appointment at the Lambeth Palace one day towards the close of last week. It was during the adjournment of the Conference for lunch, and as I entered the library of the great building, which is not a palace merely in name, the sight was really a most interesting one. Seated round tables in the quiet recesses and at a large table at the head of the great room were some dozens of bishops scribbling away as if for dear life with quill pens, evidently making a big effort to get even, m their spare moments, with their voluminous correspondence. The ancient appearance of the room, largely contributed to by the old volumes lining the shelves, would have made the humau element seem somewhat out of place had it not been that the attire of the bishops harmonised with the surroundings. In their unusual environment they put me irresistibly in mind t f the pictures of the notary of the early part cf the century made familiar to us in so many books. The effectwas heightened by an immense scroll of parchment lying on a table covered with hieroglyphics. This, I afterwards learner], was an address to the QuceD, and what I had taken for ancient writings of some description were really the signatures of practically all the bishops of the British Empire. I soon found Bishop Cov.ie, and he very kindly showed me the chamber in which the great conferences of the English Church have this year been held. Previously, the library through which I had passed was

utilised for the conferences. But the bishops hre such an ever-increasing body that this time the banqueting hall was tho only chamber iu the palace large enough to accommodate the gathering. The C:nicroiice, as everybody knows, is held once iu ten years, and this time it was hold one year earlier than usual, because IS9" is the 1,300 th anniversary of the consecration of the firat Archbishop of Canterbury. The deliberations at the Conference are strictly confidential, and all my questions while ■we were talking on a seat on the lawn failed to got anything more from Bishop Cowie than that some questions having very considerable bearings on colonial church matters had been discussed. The whole thine, however, will be published a3 soon as possible after the Conference, which closed last Monday with a service iu St. Paul's dihedral. Thau all will, of course, be allowed to let their tongues wag as freely as they like, and we shall see what we shall see—probably nothing. Besides his conference dutij', Bishop Cowia has been doin" a r»co:l

deal of outside work. On the = lt!,h July ho filled the pulpit at the church of the Holy Trinity, Brompton. The following Sunday he preached in the morning at St. Stephen's, Kennington, and in the evening at St. Ann's, Hoxlon. On the L'orh his preaching engagement was at Salisbury Cathedral, and last Sunday he was heard in the morning at St. James's, Ifampstead, while in the evening he was present with tho other bishops at a service at St. Paul's Cathedral. In company with Mrs Cowie the bishop left early this'week for Scotland. They first of all stay at the Earl of Glasgow's seat_ in the South, and afterwards visit the bishop's native place, remaining in Scotland altogether about three week?. On tho 2?ud of the present month Bishop Cowie will conduct the service at St. Mary's, .Stafford, where ho was rooter from ISO 7to 1569. Tho Bishop and Mrs Cowie leave for home via Paris, Genoa, and Erindisi about the first week in October. Mr J. P. Cowie, who has been gaining some experience as curate at Hoxton, returns with them to Auckland. BISHOP OF WEI.TJXf;TON". In answer to our queries for some information as to his doing 3, Bishop Wallis writes :—"The Conference has been occupying all my time, so it has not been possible for me to arrange a meeting, as you were so kind a3 to suggest, and next week, immediately after the service at St. Paul's Cathedral, which closes the Conference, I am starting for a round of visits to friends of our clergy in the Wellington diocese, and others there who I think will like to hear of their friends in New Zealand. Then the week after we go to thft West Country,

where we remain for August. Wo return to New Zealand toward the end of September or the beginning of October. I do not yet know which. I have been preaching at Streatham, Paddicgton, and High Wycombe lately, but most of my time has been occupied with the working of the Conference. I have been put on three committees, and was secretary to one of them, so I have been kept very hard at work. The resolutions of our Conference are to be published next week, and you will then know what we have been doing. Meanwhile we are not allowed to say anything about our proceedings. But I suppose there is no harm je saying that there has been a most united spirit among us all through, and that the presence of our American brethren has been a very great pleasure to everybody." I'.ISIIOP JUUUS. A number of bishops who are in England just at present availed themselves of the invitation to be present on Thursday last at a diocesan missionary festival held in the ancient Ely Cathedral", one of the noblest

ecclesiastical edifices ii: England. Naw Zealand was well represented by Bishop Julius, who tpoks in the afternoon on ' The Influence of the late Bishop S-;lwyn upon Missionary Work in New Zealaud. AN ERRATIC .MAIL SERVICE. Till the Huddart - P.irker liners can manage to stick to their time-tables there is not much chance of the Vancouver service bowling out the 'Frisco route or getting any real hold on colonial passengers. To-dav (August 5) the first direct mail for New Zealand via Vancouver should have left London. Owing, however, to the Aorainn failing to come up to lime it is postponed "a fortnight. The Aorangi should have left Vomouver on August 2:!, but will not now &u.il till September (i. I called at the company's London office on Tuesday to make a few inquiries from Mr James Huddart about

the alteration, but found that that gentleman was out of town. I was informed, however, that the time-table, with the exception of the unavoidable changing of the Aorangi's dates, was to be adhered to. Ever since thi3 line was started there has been a somewhat annoying change from the time-table issued. And the fact that those changes were always unavoidable has not made them any the more relished by intending passengers. lam informed that the inclusion of a New Zealand port in the service is more in the way of being a penuinency than an experiment. Whether it will be Wellington or Auckland that will be eventually included in the route is not as yet definitely settled. The question is which of these two ports will offer the best trade and greatest inducements, and this can only be deeided aftor eoma test of their relative advantages, '

Auckland ha 3 a handicap over Wellington hi this matter, in that calling at the lattor makes the voyage one day longer than if the Northern port were substituted. SHW ZEALASD SHIPPING REGCLATIOSS. . In the House of Commons on July 27 Sir E. Hill (member for South Bristol) asked the Seoretary for the Colonies whether his attention had been called to the fact that section 10 of the New Zealand Shipping and Seamen's Act, 189G, would have the effect of setting aside contracts as to rates of wages formerly entered into in the United Kingdom between shipowners and seamen, and of compelling shipowners to pay whatever might be the " current wages " on the New Zealand coast while their vessels traded there. The Bristol member tacked on to this specific ease a more general plea askiDg the Secretary for the Colonies whether he could not see his way to make any representations to the Premiers of British colonics suggesting that legislation upon shipping should' not, except in eases of extreme necessity, extend beyond the provisions of the British Merchant S! p ping Act, 1894, and any Acta hereafter passed amending that Act. Mr Chamberlain took it on himself to reply to Sir E. Hill. His attention had been called to the section in question, and he had, after consulting with the Board of Trade, suggested to the colonial Government the expediency of amending it so as to limit the application to ships engaged in the Now Zealand coasting trade. The colonial Government?, Mr Chamberlain thought, were aware that Her Majesty's Government considered uniformity of legislation upon shipping throughout the Empire to bo desirable so fir as local circumstances would permit. I notice that in .. letter to 'The Times' on Thursday, the :2fUh ult., the Hon. W. P. Reeves meets the case brought up by Sir E. Hill satisfactorily. After Retting out what occurred in the' House, Mr Reeves goes on to say ;

| SI have not the honor to know whit communication lias been sent by the Secretary of State for the Colonies to my Covernment on the matter, but for the information of persons engaged in the New Zealand trade I wish to point out that the very section mentioned in the question and answer jesterday specilically limits in its latter part the wages clause spoken of by Sir K. Hill and Mr Chamberlain, and tontines its operation to Xew Zeahind vessels or to vessels which engage in the New Zealand coastal trade by taking in freight or passengers in the colony and carrying them trom port to port there. The proviso to section 10 is as follows:— *'Provided that this section shall not apply to .-hips arriving from abroad with passengers or cargo, but not trading in the colony further or otherwise than for the purpose of discharging such original passengers or cargo in the colony and there shipping fresh passengers or cargo to be carried abroad."

So another New Zealand bogey has been unearthed by a member of tho House of Commons and killed like a number of its predecessors by the Hon. W. P. Peeves before it had enjoyed a very long space of life. I'KIISi.iXAI. AM) i:i;m;K.\].. The strange eventful history of Mr Albert Calvert's last tcur of the Westraliangoldlields will be given to the world very shortly in a guinea volume, lavishly illustrated ' with photographs. The authors of the work (which is edited by Mr Calvert) are, I understand, his JiJii* Achate.* Mr Graham Hill and a Westralian journalist who accompanied the expedition. Mr Chamberlain i 3 much interested in the success of the Hon. W. I'. Reeves's Concilia-

tion ami Arbitration Act iu New Zealand, and only the oilier day applied to him for fall particulars relating thereto. I also leora that the Agent-General has been invited to play a prominent put iu connection with the Co-operative Associations' Exhibition at the Crystal Palace on the 17th inst.

Our Agents-General, having with devout beuisons bidden faro well to the colonial Premiers, lost no time in packing up their own traps for a thorougly well-earned holiday. Just at present,luleed, both Crosby square and Victoria street are decried". The Hon. Thomas and Mrs Plavford have gone to "bouaie Seothnd," the Hon. W. F. and Mrs Raovc-s are cycling in Brittonv, and Sir Km! and Lady Sumuel will thin week be found recruiting by the s.rd sea wav-s which lap the I-de c.fThar.ot. The exact data of the retirement of tho veteran representative of New S.-uth Wale 3 will, it is understood, depend nn the colonial I'.uliamsnt confirming Mr R.-id's arrangement with him. Probably, however, Sir SMil's successor will be with us early next year.

Sir George Grey continues to batll- the predictions of his medical attendants in a most surprising manner. On the dav Mr Seddon bade him f\rewcll tho end seemed to be merely a question of hours. Unquestionably, however, the little excitement did the G.O.M. good. Since then he has been much, stronger ; in fact, every day this week it has been feasible to take him short drives. The hot weather seems to euit him, though he used to say it didn't. Dr W. A. Chappie, cf Wellington, who is in London, as I have before stated, porting himself up in matters medical, sat tho week after his arrival for the M.R.C.S, degree of Englat.d. The fourteen days' nolle*? usually necessary was in his case dispensed willi bv special request to the Board. . Tiio result of the examination has just been made known, and Mr Chappie is now able to place after hi 3 name with his other degree " M.R.C.S., E:ig." This week he left for Glasgow to take up public health work there, it is, in fact, with him pretty well all work and no play.

The other day Mr A. Clarke Betrg, of Ducedin, looked in at the Press Agency. He has, as you know, been studying at Edinburgh during the last eighteen months with a view to taking hi 3 medical degree, and the examinations being over he" has taken the opportunity to run up to London. During the two months' summer vacation he proposes a trip to Paris, and apparently looks forward with pleasurable anticipations also to some time spent with relatives and friends in Scotland. Mr B-gg has been trying to read with a view of passing both the London and Edinburgh examinations. The undertaking is a very big one, however, and I think that he will eventually settle down to wbrk for the London degreej which ia generally considered the best a medied man can hold.

I hear that Mr Goldie, of Auckland, who has been going through the Edinburgh medical course, has just taken his degree "of M.B.C.M. It seems that to commemorate the Jubilee in good style the examiners let through this year practically all those who knew anything about medicine, only plucking twenty out of the 150 who went up. This is, of course, a student's story, and I am not going to vouch for its truth. Mr Goldie, however, did not require any such clemency as that imputed to the examiners. He passed with what they call "distinction," which means, I believe, that he was one of the first eight. The Bishop of Christchurch and his family return via Australia. They are not staying very long after the close of the Lambeth Conference, their intention being to voya»e by the Messageries Maritime'sArmand Behic, which leaves Marseilles on the 15th in3t. A New Zealander hailing from the southern part of the colony told me rather a good story the other day. He was "doing" Egypt a few weeks ago, and being somewlfat out of season had to make the trip to the Pyramids by himself. The Bedouins have not made themselves a reputation as over honest folk, and this gentleman thought the best way to get along would be to just use the few words of Arabic he knew and make a profession of ignorance of any other language. So when he was accosted by de-

mauds for back-ihUh he politely signified in Arabic that lie was not having any. On arrival at the Pyramids he en-g-i;;ed in the usual way two of the darkskinned sons of the Prophet to assist him in the ascent. About halfway up the Natives sat down and professed to be tired—a ruse for extracting backshish they nearly always try on. From this I will let the New Zev lander tell his own story. "They started questioning me," said he, "as to what nationality I belonged to. They had goue through English, Scotch, French, German, Austrian, Chinese—in fact, all the bestknown races—without striking the right one before they gave up in despair. At last one of thc-m ejaculated : ' Where do you come from then 5' I replied : ' Oh, I'm a Maori.' lhG look of intelligence that overspread both their faces at a word they had probably never before heard was ludicrous. ' Maori very good ' 'said they ■ 'give Bedouin plenty backshish.'

At the dinner given by Mr Scddon at the Hotel tecil on the eve of his departure for New Zealand I had ; the opportunity of a conversation with Father Lynch, of Uunedin

whom I had seen on one or two previous occasions, though only for a minute or two. He has apparently mado a very extensive and interesting tour of the East. To begin with, he spent a fortnight in Egynt, and from Cairo journeyed up the Nils to Alexandria. During the fortnight that ho stayed at Jerusalem ho visited most of the historical environs—Jordan, Jericho, the Dead Sea, and Bethlehem. One of Father Lyneh'a mo3t interesting experiences seems to have been Eister or Holy Week in Jerusalem, when he was the only English-speaking priest in the city. In Galilee he visited Mount Carmel, St. Jean d'Acre, Nszireth, Mount Thabor, Tiberias, and many places of Biblical interest on the Sea of Galilee. Damascus, Mount Lebanon, and Baalbec were among the places viaited in North Syria ; and the iaianda in the Levant, touched at en route to Constantinople, were Cyprus, Smyrna, Rhodes, Chio, and Mitelyne. Father Lynch was in Constantinople during the recent war, and besides seeing the Sultan during the ceiemony of "Celamlik," or weekly state visit to the morque, was present at a review of 10,000 Turkish troops. He arrived in Athens just after the battle of Domoko, when talk of revolution was in the air, the populace being incensed at the King. At Rome Father Lynch was just in time for the ceremony of Canonisation, to witnc33 which there was a congregation of over 50,000 persons in St. Peter's. He was apparently immensely struck with the personality of Lao vlll., whom he saw on two occasions, Father Lynch seems to have been just in lime for everything, for he arrived in London ] early enough to sec the Jubilee cdebra- j lions, and, I understand, did the procession ! and the military and naval rsviews'in proper svyle. For the latter someone -lent him a yacht, aud he engaged a crack waterman, and they sailed up and down the liner-, when they were not supposed to do so, to their hearts' content. Whenever one of the patrol boats headed towards them with a view of forcibly removing the yacht, the expedient of pulling the helm hard a port and prctesuling to get out of the way always answered. The patrol boats immediately went after other fry, and as soon as their attention was engaged in another direction the Father and his yacht resumed their course and went en their way for a little while unmolested. At present Father Lynch is in Ireland, where he is spending part of July and August; afterwards he intends "doing 1 ' Scotland, France, Germany, and the part of Itu.lv he has not already visited. The programme he ha 3 mapped out for himself will pretty well occupy his lime up to the line of his leave, which, I believe, expires in January next. The Board of Trinity (Musical) College, London, have, in response to numerous requests, decided to hold annually in New Zealand the examination for the college diploma of Associate in Music (A.Mus. Teh.). This examination up to the present has been held only in London. This dseision of the Board, I understand, comes into operation this year.

Tho Rev. Willi im Rea<!y, of Duaedin, received a warm welcome last week at the L3eds Wesleynn Conference. On the Ist he preached one of the missionary sermou3 in the Conference chapel, la referring to his discourse the 'Christian World' says: "Mr Ready is an Irishman, and though there is no trace of the brogue the race comes out in his abounding ready wit and natural oratorical powers. He held tho heated and packed audience entranced for three - quarters (f an hour as he discoursed on Nehemiah and his work." This is very ui-jo indeed, and the same pnp-r gives the rev. gentleman another pat 0:1 the hack, for, referring to his welcome at tho Confsrer.ce it, sayr,"7 " His great woik at D.'med in New Zealand has been followed by his English friends with much gratification." This is all rght, but what I have b:;cn auxin:? to know ever since rending the paragraph i:> in what pi! I of the colony is Dimed situated. 1 r.hvavs Prided myself thai I wai wdl up in New Z«aja'nd ge graph-.-, but as to tin whereabouts of "D.nied" I nml uublushingly confess my ignorance. Of course everyone knows th-'t the R'lv. W. Rc-ady comes from Dunedin, but I. put the question : Is it fair to ask the unenlightened reader to interpret "Dimed " Duacdin ?

A New Zoalauder in the person of Mr James Smith has been attending the great Wcsleyan Confercp.ee at L-0.-ls din-iii" thf pa-,t fortnight. On Monday last he presided at an immense public meeting in connection with missionary work. The 'Christian World' has discovered that New Zealand'* Premier, the Right Hon. R J. Seddon, is an old scholar of the Sunday school at St. Helen?.

Mr Basil Tebbs, of Auck'and—or perhaps it would be mere correct to say late of Auckland—is doing very well indeed. It. will be remembered that 113 was appointed somo time ego to the position of Demonstrator of Anatomy ut Q.icen'.s Culkgc, Cambridge, and besides this he has fnrty and fifty private pvinila to c-oach.' Although it must iv.ako his life >•, very bv<;r one, we all kcoiv that, the penalty of Yueccs's U that the buecossful have to jjet through more wotk than is really good for thorn. The medical students in London, as elsewhere, have ju-t completed their tummcr examinations. I saw one of their number in the person of Mr F. W. Dawson, of Auckland, the other day, who was oa the eve of his departure for a holiday in Bath (not in a bath). He informed me that he had secured the pharmacologic and therapeulic or some such long-named class prize in the examinations, The value thereof was two guineas. AustralasLn speakers had a good innings at the " tea right" given last Monday ni«ht in connection with tire Wedeyan Conference at Ltecls. The gathering was held in an immense building called the Victoria Hall. Chief Justice Way on taking the chair at the after meeting was greeted by the 11 prising of the entire audience of between two and three thousand people. His address consisted of a review of Bible Christian history and development in Australasia. The Rev. W. Ready followed with a description of his work ia Duredin, which carried the audience completely away. The chairman said it was the most unreportable and unconventional speech he had ever listened to, and while he had the audience laughing lie adroitly appealed for donations towards the Missionary jSociet'y's debt of £l,(m7. More than £l*27 was promised,

Mr Walter Coath, of Wellington, has ben in England for some little time, bavin" come Home -partly for plea-ure and partly tj have an old and serious all" ction of the right arm attended to. It is pleasing to learn that under the treatment of one of the most eminent English specialists (Ur Fer nier) there is a chance of Mr Coath gaining full use of the injured limb. At present the Uellmgtonian is staying at Peneoed Glamorganshire. He expects to be under the care doctor for another six or eight weeks. Afterwards ho returns to the colony via America, and purposes spending about three weeks visiting the places of interest en route.

i Miss L. Large, of Napier, the soprano w! o nas been in England now for three years has decided to mike a tour in New Zealand' [ and sails by the lonic on September 2. She is just managing to get a good footing on the musical ladder of the London metro polia, the topmost of which means fame and her voice and method of production hvi wonderfully improved since she was last heard at the Antipodes Mi3s Large will probably " do" the colony with Maughan Barnett, and return to London by the second week in May in time for the IS9S season's engagements Mr Large, her brother, is desirous of persuading Herr Balling to make the trip out, but the probability of his doing so is remote. The (rcrman, who obtains such beautiful music from the violin alto, is a very busy man nowadays. He has been stage mana<mie and training the choruses in connection with this year's great Beyreuth festival a capelkmader is the correct designation for his position—and it is said that Madame Wagner looks upon him as the comin» con-

ductor at Beyreuth. Speaking of the violin alto reminds me that that instrument is getting something of a footing, and from people in a position who formerly opposed it it now receives support. Dr Lunn's most recent enterprise in the tourist business is a voyage round the British Etipire, which is by way of celebrating the Jubilee year. The liner Berlin is to be chartered for tho cruise, and, leaving Loudon on December 28, will be away five months, some days being spent at various places en route. The proposal is looked upon with favor by a number of leading

representatives of the colonies. Sir Gordon Sprigg, Premier of Cape Colony, thinks it most desirable that English people should see for themselves the outlying portions of the Empire, and the Right Hon. 8. J. Way promises hearty Australian hospitalities to those who undertake the cruise. Certainly the voyage would be a magnificent object lesson in the greatness of the Empire and tho conditions of colonial life.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18970913.2.9

Bibliographic details

OUR LONDON LETTER., Issue 10418, 13 September 1897

Word Count
5,839

OUR LONDON LETTER. Issue 10418, 13 September 1897

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