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CRICKET NOTES.

Up to the termination of the match against Thornton's team on September 7 (the day the mail left) the Australians had scored 12,962 runs.

During the progress of a match in England last- August between Chadwell St. Mary and Corringham one of the Corringham team returned the ball sharply towards the wicket, and it struck the umpire on the side of the forehead. The blow caused him to fall, but he resumed his duties, and continued to act until the conclusion of the match. He afterwards walked home, but subsequently suffered intense pain in the head. A doctor was called in, but he succumbed the next day, the cause of death being effusion of blood on the brain.

Playing for the Northbrook Club at Lee, against Norwood, on August 19, T. W. Blenkiron made 24 runs off one over—viz., 4, 6, 6, 4, 4.

W. D. Llewelyn, a well-known English cricketer, was accidentally shot through the heart on August 25. The deceased played for Oxford University in 1890. He also formed oue of Lord Hawke's team which visited India last winter.

The one redeeming feature of the Sussex averages for the last season was the bowling record of Humphreys, and it is indeed marvellous how on the excellent wickets he has secured the lion's share of the victims with his underhand deliveries. He fairly eclipsed himself, and in county cricket has taken 122 wickets for under 16£ runs apiece, whereas no other Sussex bowler averages less than twice that figure. According to the ' Scottish Referee,' the speed at which a cricket ball is delivered by a fast bowler may be roughly estimated at a, mile a minute. When Turner, the Australian, visited Woolwich Arsenal he was requested by an official to bowl through tlie electric screens in use for measuring the velocity of projectiles. It was found that, at a point representing half-way betweefl the wickets, the velocity of Turner's ball was 81ft per second, or fifty miles an hour. At this rate the ball would traverse the pitch in 22-27ths of a second. Several bowlers, however, as, for instance, Mold, (the iincashire professional) and Kortright (the Essex marvel), bowl faster than Turner, and this would bring the pace to the mile per minute. It may be well understood that a batsman has to keep all his wits about him to guard

his wickets and his body from such attacks as these.

The following is a detailed account of Turner's injury in tho last of tho teßt af|ijc v the luncheon .'adjourn* shorfc-pifoKed ball TurneßSo heavily on' the hand as to knock the finger back and quite but.of joint. his bat, evidently in great pain, bub Blackhamcalled his partnerior a run, and Turner made all haste down.'the pitch. Before he reached the opposite crease ho called out loudly and made for Grace ere the ball was dead. Then, realising his mistake, lie ran in his ground, but no sooner had the ball settled in M'Gregor's hands than the colonial ran to Grace. The doctor grasped the situation at once, but there was a long struggle ere the finger was replaced in its proper position. W. Read was quickly at hand with a glass of brandy, and in a few minutes Turner gamely went on with his innings. Almost every stroke he took mado the batsman wince again, but he kept Blackham company for nearly half an hour, a stand that went a long way towards saving the game. A strange incident occurred in a match in Ceylon recently. Gunner Quinlin was fielding in the outfield, and a ball was hit up high iu the air towards him. He ran back to catcli it, but could not quite get under it. He, however, just managed to reach it, and the ball hit him fair on ths top of the helmet (a regulation one). Instead of bouncing off it went right through, resting on his head inside, aud also flattening the helmet somewhat over his ears. The umpire gave the batsman out.

On September 2 Gunn increased his aggregate of runs scoied during the present season in first-class cricket to 2,019. The last occasion of this performance being achieved was in the Jubilee year, when Grace at the end of the season hail scored 2,062 runs. Giyui had played forty-six completed innings, his'average per innings being 43.80. Bicklcy Park scored'4o4 for four wickets when playing against the Stoics on August 25. The first two batsmen (Bouch and Davy) compiled -147 and 130 respectively. The former opened his account with a six, the ball going clean over the tall trees into the road. He also hit three fives, seventeen fours, nino threes, and lour twos. Davy hit twenty-one fours and six threes.

In the Notts-Australian match Attewell, in going forward to a ball, which he missed, was appealed against for stumping, and the umpire gave it out; but Blackham had not shifted the bails—a fact that was soon pointed out by Atfewsll, who of course remained where he was. Essex secured an easy and wcll-deservcd victory by 102 runs over Surrey on August 25. This result was due not only largely bit almost entirely to the demoralising effect of Kortright, the "cyclone" bowler, on the Surrey batfmien, for from the moment he took a wicket in the first innings Surrey, cheaply ay they had got rid of Essex, may be said to have played a losing game. They had all the best of the wicket, and whatever luck there was in the game was on their side. They Ljot Kssex out for o*2, und made 20 for one wicket themselves ; then Kortright would not be denied, and with such terrible ett'ect did he bowl that not a man on the side could do anything against him, and the remaining nine wickets went down like skittles for an addition of 34. Essex replied with 170. This left Surrey 179 to get to win. Abel and Maurice Read made a promising start, putting together 35 before they were parted, and once more Kortright, as soon as, figuratively speaking, ho had got his distance, proved practically unplayable, the other nine wickets adding but 41. Kortright did not take so many wickets as in the first innings, because Mead did not give him the chance, but the batsmen were as helpless against him as before, and each of the fiv» he sent back were clean bowled —three in his last over—the middle or off stump in every case being sent flying into the air. The pace at which he bowled was something astounding. The wicket-keeper stood some eight yards back, yet over and over again these experienced Surrey bats, accustomed as they are to fast bowling, were in the act of striking at tho ball when it was already safe in the wicket-keeper's hands. A prominent member of the side, who for the last ten years lias played against every bowler of note in England and Australia, gave it as his opinion that, as he was bowling in this match, Kortright was at least two yards faster than any howler he had ever previously stood up to, and this appeared to be the unanimous opinion of tho team. In the match ho took thirteen wickets (twelve clean bowled) for 01 runs and, be it noted, during neither innings can the ground be said to have particularly favored him. In the concluding match of the Scarborough Festival—that against Thornton's team —the Australians had the worst of the draw. When they went in for last " knock" 185 were wanted to win, and an hour and a-half to get them in. Lyons did his share, but after the departure of the big hitter four wickets fell in less than forty minutes for an addition of 20 runs. Banncrman and Lyons were the first to bat, and Peel and Richardson were put on to bowl. The big hitter laid on to Richardson at the start, the first three balls sent down by the Surrey professional going at express speed to the boundary. Lyoiis's first five were all fours, and in three overs he scored 22 runs from the fast bowler. At 32 Smith relieved Richardson, and Lyons despatched his first three balls to the boundary. After scoring 47 out of 61 in thirty-five minutes, the South Australian cut one from Peel into his wicket. His dashing innings was made up of nine fours, three twos, and five singles. From this out the game went in favor of the home side, and when stumps were pulled up the colonials still wanted 08 runs, and practically but four wickets to fall, Gregory being disabled. Sixteen of Blackpool and District v. tho : Australians.—ln this match on August 28 Lyons—who batted first with Bruce—gave a marvellous exhibition of rapid scoring, and wholly monopolised the hitting, the total, when he was 52, being no more than 67. Three times he hit the ball out of the ground, delaying the game on one occasion for five minutes while they looked for it. When at last he was caught in the longfield he had made 62 out of 71, which had taken him just forty minutes. Besides his three sixes he hit half a dozen fours and the same number of twos. M.C.C. and Ground v. Yorkshire.-—This match ended in a brilliant victory for the Northern shire by seven wickets. Spofforth played for M.C.C, but it will be seen his bowling received but scant courtesy from the Light Blue captain. When Yorkshire 'went in a second time they wanted 195 to win. Jackson and Sellers were the first to face the bowling of Hearne and Spofforth, and the start was none too good, seeing that the latter left at eighteen. The next wicket, however, gave a lot of trouble, as, though Brown made but a few runs, Jackson hit in brilliant fashion. Spofforth came in for the most punishment, the Light Blue hitting him in the course of two overs for sixteen runs. Brown was in a quarter of an hour before he scored, but though Rawliu relieved Spofforth, 40 runs were hoisted at the' end of half an hour's play. Seventeen later Brown was second out, for 7 runs, but Tuunicliffe rendered valuable assistance. With bis figures at 67 Jackson gave a chance to the wicket-keeper, which Davenport failed to hold, and though Spofforth, Hearne, Fry, Rawlin, and Stoddart changed about, runs came with almost astonishing rapidity. Jackson hit 10 from three balls delivered by Hearne, while Tuunicliffe made two grand drives to the off boundary. In.this way 73 runs were put on in fifty minutes before Tunnicliffe hit one up. This, the third wicket, fell at 130, and 65 were still required when Smith joined Jackson. The scoring was now faster than ever. Smith opened with a couple of fours off : toddart, and then getting to the opposite end he' despatched the last three balls of an over from Spofforth to tiie boundary. -Oft' seven of the "demon's" overs 46" runs were scored. Jackson (111) and Smith (40) were still in when the game was won. The 195 runs were scored inttow { o hours. r

The winning, of the county championship by Yorkshire has been deservedly won by a team practically a new one from that whiah last carried off the honor in 1883, Hawke, Peel, and Ulyett alone the latter batsman's career with the county is weH-nigh closed. He has completed twentyone'years' of service.

A. fe% jtho Mayflowor v. Oregon oil Augiia A t 19, ha4.the remarkable analysis of fiyje one run, H. BivJlArpe?, ftjaving* on the same date, oaptijr&jiC for four runs, performing the hat trick, and smashing the leg stump in halves .tfitp the last ball. Eight wickets for jaoV r»ns. —Playing for Mi(llmrst Institute against Bedford, A. Wormart todfc;'"eight "Wickets (five clean bowled) in the first inningftjf Redford without a run being tirored from him. On September 2, in the Halifax district, an extraordinary bowling feat was performed by a young player named Shaw, of Rastrick. He rcaS'-playing in a match between Mr Edwin's and Mr Wheatley's teams, and sent down six overs, five of which were maidens, for two runs and ten wickets. The last sk were taken with sflo», cessive balls, five being cleau bowled and one'eaught.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18931028.2.29.11

Bibliographic details

CRICKET NOTES., Evening Star, Issue 9276, 28 October 1893, Supplement

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2,049

CRICKET NOTES. Evening Star, Issue 9276, 28 October 1893, Supplement

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