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OUR LONDON LETTER.

ANGLO-COLONIAL NOTES. Lond*, May Day, 1891. After innumerable delays and much diplomatic negotiations, Russia has at length allowed herself to be persuaded into agreeing to the reduction of the cable rates to 'your Part of the world. The Imperial . Government's final decision was only wired to the Agents-General on the 27th. In celebration of the reduction of the cable rates the Agents-General are to be permitted to forward any social message they may wish to send to Australia or New Zealand free of charge. This brilliant idea is, needless to say, Sir John Pender »._ The least the Agents can do under the circumstance is to include a delicate compliment to " tho enterpiiaina and energetic chairman of the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company " in their gratiß communications. The « Economist' Beriomly advises the Australian colonies to reassure the London momy maiket by giving a joint undertaking not to borrow further for a couple of years nr so. Orher papers smile satirically at the proposal, remarking that you have got so accustomed to livirg on loans you really wouldn't exist without one for a. twelve month, much less for two years. The Australian * Trading World' grimly coogratu lates Victoria on having been able to raise two millions. With the market_ in its present mood, this Wis, it considers, a sufficiently remarkable achievement. Shippers of butter and cheese from New Zealand have every reason to be pleased with the Euccess which they have gained in the London market this year. Doubtless, the very satisfactory prices which have been realised for produce up to now are owing in a great measure to the shortness of Continental and Home supplies and the continuance of suitable weather. But great credit must bs given to Mr Henry of Auckland, and Mr Henry Gray, of Christchurch, and Mr Cox, the agent for the Middle Island Dairying Association, who, since their arrival in England at the commencement of the season, have done much good work in exploiting New Zealand dairy produce. Of" course, the«e gentlemen have been working mainly for their own interest-, but none the less they deserve the heartiest thanks of those who are in any wayconnected with the business. Of Mr Reynolds's doings in London I have informed you tally iu previous mails, and I am glad to be ahle to testify to the good work of his "comatcs in exile " Mr Gray, in conjunction with Messrs Cory and Co., of Tooley street, ! as done much that will be of service both 1> his own supporters and the community of New Zealand dairy produce shippers gener.iUy. Mr day, to begin with, made careful inquiries into the manner in which the interests of producers were being looked ffter at this end. Many offers were made him by firms who had had dealings in New Zealand produce to act as agents, etc., but eventually Mr Cray decided to accept the services of Messrs Cory. He has every reason to be satisfied with his choice, and it is to Mr Gray and the firm mentioned that Uie credit belongs of having made full prices for New Zealand butter and cheese vcee the commencement of the season. I told you last mail of the unfortunate accident to the refrigerating machinery of the Arawa and its consequences. Mr Gray, in accordance with his regular practice, was p.eseut at the docks during the unloading of this eleimer'a butter, and having observed t'i)> condition in which the stuff arrived, at once advised the various consignees Strong representations were made to the ov/-ners of tho vessel; but whilst expressing regret for the untoward o?ev.vre-nce, the latter refused to accept vespousi'uili'y for damage done. Mr no:ds, of Auckland, tells me that he and o;hir consign*.e> have been negotiating with re New Zealand shipping compinits with a v;ew to ge-t.ing srcie reductions in the tecight rate 3 for dairy produce. On Monday next a deputati-ja consisting of Messrs Reynolds, C<x, and Gray will wait on Me?sra Shaw, Savill, and Company to discuss the question of freight, methods of carrying dairy goods, etc. Mr Reynolds is most anxious to be able to impart trustworthy information concerning frez3u meat, fruit, dairy produce, etc., to all and sundry in New Zealand who may care to ask him questions when he returns to the colony, aud to this end he is looking up facts and figures in all Quarters. Mr Gray remains in England fcr the present iu tho interests of his firm.

A Lloyd's broker who recently disappeared had effected insurances by the illfated New Zealand trader Assaye with underwriters at Lh-yd's. The gentlemen who wrote the risk to the abgcandifg broker now find that tho loss which they paid to that gentleman has not been passed on to the assured, on the plea that the Committee of Lloyd's were investigating the case. The assured now claim the loss from the underwriters direct, but the latter naturally object to "fork out" a sectmd time, and in all probibilifcy the matter will ti.'-.d its way into the law courts. Auswering a question put by Mr Howard Vincent in the Hc-'ise of Commons on Thursday 'ast, Sir Jame3 Fergusson said that the Government were aware of the resolution unanimously adopted by tho Manchester Chamber of Commerce on 2Sth April, IS9O, to tho effect that no treaties of commerce should iu future be renewed or entered into which preclude preferential arrangements between the United Kingdom and the British colonies with regard to their respective products. This view would be borne in mind in any negotiations for tho renewal of expiring treaties. Mr Ernest Betzon has reappeared in London, but in somewhat different circles to those which the "poor Jubilee" once adorned. Mr Benzon Reems to have fallen only slightly in his own esteem, and his manners are just as —well, shall we say enqci'/ing as of yore ! The Plunger will talk of" those two royal years of folly to his dying day. In the provinces many folk still lo"ok°up to him as a " knowing card," etc. Colonel Mapleson has, on dit, offered the Australian songstress, Madame Melba, L;) 0 000 for two seasons, of ten weeks each, in the States. According to a contemporary, niadame is "considering the proposal 1" Mr 3 Drew, who \vi!l be well known to New Zealanders by her iwm de theatre, " Madame Kate Lovel!," has obtained & decree nisi against her husband, Mr Lais James Drew, on the grounds of desertion and adultery. Petitioner was given the custody of the child of the marriage. The respondent is still living in sin somewhere in the Antipodes. Mr H H. Cfcampmu has returned to Loudon, despite tWsinister rumors propagated by his quondam labor conjrtres to the effect that he daro not show himsplf here for fear of unpleasant police proceedings. He does not hesitate to express to dec'are that tho Australian working meu in their great strike were the dupes aud victims of in-cj-iable and unscrupulous leadera. He averts that had the settlement he advocated been accepted the colonics would have been saved au enormous loss, the Australian workmen nearly a couple of milliousiu wages, and the disruption of the federation of labor w>uld have been prevented. The LSOO cabled Home from Sydney in ail of the evicted tenants' fund has heartened up the M'Carthyites wonderfully. The financial difficulty is every day becoming more acute with them. Many members cannot afford te turn up as they did in tbe well paid days of Parnell's rule, and to set ande any money for assisting them whilst the evicted tenants waut is of course imimpossible. . Mr Henniker-Heaton, MP., is, I regret to learn, really very ill, a severe attack of Russian influenza having completely prostrated him. His condition on Wednesday caused considerable anriety, but he seemed rather stronger yesterday.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18910616.2.34

Bibliographic details

OUR LONDON LETTER., Evening Star, Issue 8543, 16 June 1891

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1,298

OUR LONDON LETTER. Evening Star, Issue 8543, 16 June 1891

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