Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

OUR CHILDREN’S EYES.

TO TOE EDITOR

fvfii, —A sull'eier from short sight, 1 soon procured and road the little hook ou ‘ Our Eyes' to which “ Reform ' has drawn attention in your issue of Thursday. Though I picked up some valuable hints relating to eases like my own, such as the imprudence of reading in railway trains, and the danger of stooping over our writing, my personal interest in the work was completely swamped by the overwhelming importance of the subjects treated by Dr Stenhouse in the introduction. It would appear from this that our schools are really nurseries of short sight, and that in a generation or so educated men will almost be universally purblind if steps are not taken to counteract and check the inordinate cramming that is going on. Now that attention has been called to the subject by a specialist of Dr Stenhouse’s undoubted ability and reputation, there will be no excuse for those who carry on the work of education—teachers, school committees, the Education Board—it the subject is not thoroughly sifted, and a remedy resolved on. My impression till now has been that our children have been getting too many holidays ; and that seems to be the general opinion of school committees. Dr Stenhouse thinks otherwise, and has thoroughly converted me to his views, which are: that childhood and youth should he devoted principally to the building up of strong and healthy frames, and that an exact balance of mental and physical requirements should therefore be observed. What have our teachers and Dr Stenhouse’s professional brethren to say on these important matters ?—I am, etc,, Parent. Dunedin, October 25.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18891028.2.36.1

Bibliographic details

OUR CHILDREN’S EYES., Issue 8049, 28 October 1889

Word Count
273

OUR CHILDREN’S EYES. Issue 8049, 28 October 1889

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working