Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Evening Star WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1889.

Wc have heard it stated that in some parts cf the City landlords are asking increased rentals on accounts of tho demand for houses during the Exhibition period ! At Clintou on Friday D. Whytock was fined L2O, with the alternative of three months' imprisonment, for sly grog-selling. Mr Revel), R.M., was the presiding magistrate.

We have Mr Gourley's authority for saying that the announcement that he intends contesting the mayoralty of St. Kilda this year is premature. The candidature of Cr C. Gore and Cr Stenhousc is, however, announced.

Another capital house witnessed the second representation of 'Never Too Late to Mend' at the Princess's last night. The principals wore repeatedly called before the curtain, while tho scenery was much admired—especially the cascade, in which the shades of dark and light were beautifully depicted. For this evening a double bill is announced 'Dora' (reproduced by special request, and 'The Lady of Lyons.' We anticipate a crowded house, the circle seats being mostly booked. ■The performance begins at a quarter to eight precisely. At the Ensilage Conference, now sitting in Melbourne, the following remarkable statement was agreed upon by all the practical men present as being a true representation of the facts :—The same fifty acres of green stuff that would produce two tons of hay altogether, at a cost of about LI per ton for the making, would produce 300 tons of ensilage at 2s per ton for the making; and the 300 tons of ensilage when made would be worth at least double the amount that the hay would be worth either for fattening or milk producing qualities, and worth many times aa much as a summer fodder for milk cows. A cow cannot eat more of the ensilage than of hay in a - day. On the night of September 19 several thousand tons of rock slid from Cape Diamond (Quebec), at the end of Dufferin terrace, to Champlain street, 300 ft below, demolishing seven dwellings. Up to midnight six bodies had been taken from the ruins—Thomas Farrell and two of his children, also two children named Burke, and one unknown child. About twenty-five persons had been removed from the debris badly injured. Some had broken arms and legs, and others were badly crushed and mutilated. Tho debris covered the road in a solid mass some 300 ft in leDgth and from 15ft to 25ft high. The recent election for Newcastle (N.S.W.) was stubbornly fought on the simpb issue of Protection v. Freetrade, and resulted in the return of Mr James Curley, the miners' secretary (who is a Freetrader), by 2,173 to 2,022 recorded for Mr William Grahame, the late member, who is a Protectionist. This was the first election under the Payment of Members Act. Mr Grahame, when elected, was third amongst the Protectionist candidates at the general election, but was compelled to resign owing to financial difficulties. Several of the miners' lodges have since the election taken action with a view to compel Mr Curley to resign the secretaryship of the association, as the miners of the county of Northumberland are Protectionists, and disapprove of Mr Curley making their interests secondary to those of Freetrade. Under the will of the late Thomas Trumble, of Invercargill, the widow obtains section 22, block 52, Invercargill, his household furniture and effects, and the residue of his property after payment of debts and legacies absolutely; also, a life interest in Broadland, Ryal Bush, and sections 6 and 7, block 1, Invercargill Hundred—after her death in equal shares to his daughters. To his daughters was bequeathed—Mary A. Tibbits, LI,000; Victoria Green, LI,000; Esther Gwynneth, L 1,000; Henrietta Trumble, LSOO (directing also that LI,OOO should be paid to her at her marriage, and in the meantime should be invested for her benefit); Ellen Stevens, L 50 0; Matilda Smith, L 50 0; Eliza J. Hayhow, L 1.000; to his granddaughter Alice M. Green, L 500; and his daughter-in-law Amy Trumble, LSOO. Annuities are to bo paid to his sons Thomas A. Trumble and George R. Trumble on their attaining tho agCB of forty-five years respectively.

A committee of the House of Lords have tried their hands at revision of expenditure, and have admitted tho possibility of conciliating Mr Labouchere and other economists to the extent of L 6,574 a year. To effect this saving Black Rod must have his salary reduced from L 2.000 a year to LI,OOO, and his house will be given to tho Clerk of the Parliaments, who, in consideration of obtaining this official residence, will have his income, diminished from L 2,500 to L 2.000. Tho clerk assistant's salary, now LI,BOO, would be reduced under the Committee's scheme to L 1,500. The sergeant-at-arms now receives L 1,500, and pays his deputy L 250. It is proposed that he should houcoforth receive onlv LI.OOO, and be relieved from the duty of paying the deputy. The Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod, now paid LI.OOO, is to have his duties discharged by the secretary to the Lord Great Chamberlain for an addition to that official's salary of L3OO. Other reductions are to be effected by curtailments in the staff of housekeepers and doorkeepers, and others of like station. The Lord Chancellor's L 4.000 as Speaker of the House of Lords is untouched, as well as his other much larger emoluments.

Mr Justice Denniston yesterday suspended the certificate of R, H. Donnelly, skating rink proprietor, for eighteen months. The Dunedin Poultry, Pigeon, and Canary Association have appointed Mr Loasby secretary, vice Mr R. Brownlie resigned. A late cablegram reports the death fn London of the Rev. G. Kilner, an eminent Wesleyan missionary, who held office as one of the secretaries df the Wesleyan Missionary Society, The opdning services in connection with the opening of the new Presbyterian Church at Milton were continued last Sabbath. In the morning the Rev. A. B. Todd preached to a very large congregation, and io. the evening Mr Duncan Wright oonduoted the first of a series of special services, which will be continued till next Sunday evening. The funeral of the late D. Berry, the New South Wales millionaire, took place on September 27. The ' Sydney Morning Herald' states that after the funeral the last will of Mr Berry was read by the Hon. James Norton. Besides numerous legacies to officials and servants long connected with the Beny Estate and to other parties, the following large bequest's were made, viz. : L 30.000 to the siistentation fund of the Presbyterian Church of New South Wales ; LIOO,OOO for the erection and maintenance of a hospital at Berry, late Brbughton Creek, for the benefit of the Shoalhaven district; and LIOO.OOO as an endowment to the University of St. Andrew's, Scotland. Mr James Hay, formerly of Auckland, inherits the bulk of the deceased's property. Chance threw me in the way (says the London correspondent of the 'Manchester Courier') of a Russian officer of the highest rank who is at present visiting this country, and who attended the reviews at Portsmouth and Aldershot. He spoke on political subjects, and amongst other things said (I quote his words as nearly as possible): '' You may rest assured of one thing, and that is that a war will break out much sooner than is imagined between Russia and Austria. I believe that Bismarck will shuffle out of the Triple Alliance on this occasion, and that possibly Italy will come to grief. England, I do not think, will be dragged into it—unless, indeed, it is for the protection of her Indian dominions. But these will stand little or no danger in the conflict. Of course Prance will be allied with Russia."

An inquest was held at Sydney on the 13th inst. on a third child that died at Mrs Batts's "baby farm" at Woolahra. The poor little body presented a horrible spectacle. The child was two months old, and the body weighed only between 31b and 41b. Elica Cohen (mother of the deceased), single woman, deposed to having given the child when only nine hours old into the custody of Mrs Batts, in answer to an advertisement in the ' Evening News.' The father paid the premium, and saw the child at intervals, when it appeared to be healthy, but had hot seen it for the last ten days. Dr MdoreSmith deposed that When called in to see the child it was too weak to cry, its body Was emaciated by injudicious and improper feeding, and to save its life waß hopeless. A post mortem examination revealed that the body was almost a skeleton; the abdominal organs had been sent for analysis, and he (Dr Smith) withheld his opinion as to the cause of death till after the analysis. A cablegram says that Mrs Batts has been committed for trial.

Lord Chief justice Coleridge presided recently at the annual meetiDg of the Exeter Oratorio Society, of which he is the president. In the course of his address he said they would permit him, as an old man; to be entitled to the prejudices of ah old man. It was said that almost all old men in some corners of their minds were Tories, lie was a thorough Tory on one point—music. He did not suppose that he, as Lord Chief Justice, should be allowed to have any politics ; but he might say that he did not think his politics had undergone much change, except perhaps that they had got a little stronger. He professed to be a Tory in music, and he thought that the old traditions and the old classical modes of music were tho best they could have. He could as little understand some of the music put before them in tho present day as he could understand Hebrew or Sanscrit. Music was, to his mind, the clothing and adorning ol melody in tlte magnificent complicated harmonies of created sound, and he could as little understand music without melody as he could understand poetry without prosody, or prose composition without grammar.

On Friday a special train will leave Dunedin for Port at 11.15 p.m. The volunteers of the district parade on Saturday at " p.m. for inspection by General Edwards.

A gymnastic and musical entertainment will be given in St. John's Hall, Roslyn, on Friday evening. The ciicket season will bo opened at Port Chalmers on Saturday by a match Old England v. Tho Woild.

A meeting of the secretaries of associated clubs Otago Cricket Association will be he.'d in the O. R. U. club room on Thursday evening. Tableaux vivants and a musical entertaitmect will be given in St. Matthew's Schoolroom on Thursday evening, in aid cf the Sunday school.

Mr M 'Arthur notifies in our advertising columns that he will give an exhibition of the new explosive rackarock on Saturday next, 26th inst, at Mr Calder's quarry, North-east Valley. It is said to be equal to dy amite in power, more suitable for hard rock, and is quite free from the noxious fumes generated by tho latter. It can be kept without the slightest risk of accidont, boing non-explosive until actually prepared for use. In connection with the John street Baptist Church, Caversbam, a sale of useful and ornamental work waß opened yesterday afternoon by the Rev. J. T. Hinton (pastor). The building was open to the public during the evening, when a large number of visitors inspected the stalls. One feature in connection with the sale is that the goods are marked exceptionally low, eo that a ready sale may be made. During the evening tho choir rendered several selections of music in a pleasing manner. The sale will be opened again this evening. The ordinary meeting of the Hand and Heart Lodge, M.U.1.0.0 F., was held on Tuesday evening at the Oddfellows' Hall, Stuart street, N.G. Bro. Thomas Mant presiding, a large attendance of members and visitors being present. Three new members were initiated. A hearty vote of thanks was passed to P. G, Bro. Clark for his report re the Friendly Societies Dispensary. The following brethren responded to the second toast:—Bro. Thornkins, on behalf of the Prince of Wales Lodge, Port Chalmers; Bro. Farland, Tinwald Lodge, North Canterbury district; P.P.G.M, Bro. Deacon, of Loyal Dunedin Lodge, The receipts of tho evening were L 25145, A large and representative meeting of the craft was held in the Masonic Hall, South Dunedin, last evening, the occasion being the installation of Bro. Elijah Titchener aa Worshipful Master of Lodge Hiram, No, 2,008, EO. The District Grand Master of the English Constitution (Bro. T. S. Graham) and the District Grand Master of the Scotch Constitution (Bro. James Gore) were present, together with their District Grand Lodge officers. R.W.D.G. Master Graham acted as installing master, and was assisted by P.Ms Bros. M'Kelvey, C. Do Longueville Graham, and Reynolds The following officers were invested for the ensuing year:—Bro. J. M'Rae Gal'away, 1.P.M.; Bro. J. A. Kirby, S.W.; Bro. J. Henderson, J.W.: Bro. Rev. Wm. Ronaldson, P.M., chaplain; Bro. H. A. Reynolds, P.M., treasurer; Bro. J. T. Laing, seoretary; Bio. A. Smart, S.D.; Bro. E. Clarke, J.D.; Bro. H. M'Oorkindale, 1.G.; Bro. H. Titchener, organist; Bro. H. Lippert, D.C. ; Bro. M. Walker, tyler; and Bro W.M'Auliffe, steward. The installation was celebrated by a reunion in the Caversham Hall, at whioh dancing was kept up till an early hour, Bros, Henderson and Smut acting as M.C.s,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18891023.2.9

Bibliographic details

The Evening Star WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1889., Evening Star, Issue 8045, 23 October 1889

Word Count
2,234

The Evening Star WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1889. Evening Star, Issue 8045, 23 October 1889

Working