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French Love-making.

As soon as two young French people are in love they want to die unless their parents immediately consent to their marriage, which is very seldom the case. Of course, they never do die. They live all the while, and are almost inclined to think that, in love matters, plain sailing is not so sweet or so romantic as obstacles to overcome. What lovely letters crossed love suggests to them! Letters invariably written at midnight— French lovers never write by day—midnight, “ vyhen all is in repose around them.” Letters full of “ All is known; we are lost! What will become of us ’ Ah ! forget me as soon as you can; we shall never be each other's. As for me, I shall die of it, I know I shall. Then you will marry another woman. I will pray in Heaven for your happiness. Perhaps now and then you will come to the cemetery and lay a bunch of violets on my tomb. You know, beloved one, that violets are my favorite flowers. y 0 u won’t forget that, will you. Farewell!” When the Frenchman in love hss an opportunity of making a viva voce declaration to the mistress of his heart, he generally sets about it in theatrical fashion,—Max O’Rell.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18891011.2.24

Bibliographic details

French Love-making., Evening Star, Issue 8035, 11 October 1889

Word Count
211

French Love-making. Evening Star, Issue 8035, 11 October 1889

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