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THE COURTS-TODAY.

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE’S COURT. (Before Messrs P. G. Prydo and F. Mcenan, Justices.) Hugh Gourley v. William Roberts.— Claim, L 3, for a saddle. There was no appearance by or on behalf of defendant, and judgment was given as prayed. _ The other cases on the list were either adjourned, struck out, or confessed. CITY POLICE COURT. (Before Messrs J. Logan and T. Brydone, J.P.s.) Vagrancy. Jane Rivers was charged with having insufficient lawful meaus of support, and pleaded guilty to tho charge. Sergeant-major Bevin said accused had frequently been warned by the _ police. There were nine previous convictions recorded against her, and she was in the habit of accosting people in the back streets of the City.—Sho was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment, with hard labor. Breaking W indown. —Michael Carey admitted breaking a window valued at 15s, and a glass valued at 2s Cd, in tho bar of the Royal George Hotel, tho property of John Thomson. Sergeant O’Neill said that accused, while drunk, asked to bo supplied with Honor, but the barman refused his request/ Accused then deliberately picked up a glass and throw it at the window, doing the damage mentioned. lie had previously been convicted on similar charges, and once smashed all the windows of tho Bank of New Zealand. —Sergeant • major Be yin said accused had a mania for smashing windows, —Accused : I’m fond of it. Mr Logan: What?— Accused : I said Pm fond of it. —He was sentenced to two months’ imprisonment with hard labor. Keeping a Disorderly House.—Elizabeth Bradley was charged with this offence. This case had been remanded to give accused a chance of leaving the town.—Sergeantmajor Bevin said that accused had not yet left the town, but her furniture had been sold, and he was led to believe that she intended to leave on Thursday.—Case further remanded for a week. Petty Larceny. —Maryarel Durie and Jane Durie were charged with stealing, on September 21, two ostrich feathers, valued at 15s, the property of Charles Hanson. Mr Hanlon defended.—Elizabeth Hanson, wife of prosecutor, said sho resided at Kensington, The accused had been in her house together and separately, the daughter sleeping in witness’s house on and after the 15th of September. One night Mrs Durie came into witness’s bedroom. She _ showed accused several ostrich feathers, which were placed in the bedroom where the daughter slept. When tho younger accused got up she was by herself in the bedroom, witness’s two daughters having left the room previously, When the accused were shown the feathers Mrs Durie said she would like to have one, and subsequently her daughter asked her to exchange a feather for another article ; but witness refused. She missed the feathers some time after tho accused had left. Witness never gave the accused the feathers, neither did sho authorise them to take the articles. Last Saturday witness recognised one of the feathers, which was at tho time in accuseds’ possession.—Evidence was also given by Charles Hanson, Henry Roscoe, Matilda Donnelly, and Sergeant Macdonnell, after which Mr Hanlon said that tho feather had been given to the younger accused as a present on account of staying at the house of prosecutor. After referring to tho evidence adduced, he asked that under the new Act of 1889 the accused be sworn and examined. The accused denied on oath having stolen the feathers, and said that one had been given to the younger accused to put in her hat. The Bench intimating that they intended to con--1 vict, Mr Hanlon asked them to deal leniently 1 with the case.—Accused were convicted and discharged, and ordered to come up for sen--1 tence when called upon.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18891008.2.25

Bibliographic details

THE COURTS-TODAY., Issue 8032, 8 October 1889

Word Count
611

THE COURTS-TODAY. Issue 8032, 8 October 1889

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