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The Evening Star. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1889.

Our supplement to day contains tho Naval review and a quantity of interesting matter from our London correspondent, an unpublished poem by E. J. Wakefield, an account of the “eighth wonder of the world,” and other matter. An Oamaru correspondent says that the general feeling there is that Mr Hislop will win his seat back, but in some quarters a close fight is anticipated. The Tuapeka Farmers’ Association are promoting a conference during the Exhibition period of agricultural representatives, for the purpose of considering matters connected vvith the farming interest. The Diocesan Synod of Canterbury, after relegating the choice of a bishop for Christchurch to a committee to report upon, adopted their recommendation to elect Archdeacon Julius, of Ballarat, to the office. The voting was: —Clergy: Ayes, 45 ; noes, 2. Laity : Ayes, 37 ; noes, 1. At Wednesday’s meeting of the City Council Cr Swan will move—“ That tho footpaths leading through the Museum Reserve be top-dressed with coarse sand and tar. Also—“ That the City Surveyor be requested to report upon the underground drain that is laid down from the top of Pitt street to the Town Belt; and also how many drains are connected with the same, with a view to ascertain its sanitary condition.”

A cablegram was received from Bishop Moran from Melbourne yesterday intimating that he will reach the Bluff on Monday, 7th prox. At the request of his Rock, conveyed in a letter sent to him to Adelaide, he has consented to remain a day at Invercargill, and make the journey to Dunedin by rail, arriving here at 7.15 p.m. on Tuesday, Bth October, He will be accompanied overland by the Rev. Fathers O’Donnell, O’Neill, Lynch, M'Mullin, and Murphy, the newlyordained priests coming to the diocese. The Warepa Farmers’ Association have passed these resolutions : —“ That the club do not approve of the poisoning of small birds placed under the control of rabbit inspectors, and consider that it would be more effectually dealt with if left in the hands of the farmers themselves. Since the railway weights as at present adopted are proved to bo very unsatisfactory, moreover being admitted by the Government to be only approximate, it is desirable that pressure be brought to bear on the Government to enforce the department to have all their weights thoroughly tested and managed, and kept to the standard weight. That as the railway freight charged on lime is excessive this club are of opinion that the same should be reduced to delivery at cost price, or at a nominal rate. That as the farthing bids on wool as at present adopted at wool sales in Dunedin are considered unsatisfactory, some action be taken with a view of having a petition signed requesting the brokers to revert to the Jd bids.” In connection with the reported discovery at Akaroa of the fossilised remains of some huge animal, the following extract from Dr Shortland’s ‘ Traditions of the New Zealanders’ is not without interest; —“ There is a very strange tradition to bo met with in different parts of Now Zealand—that when first their ancestors arrived there existed amphibious reptiles, resembling inform and appearance the ngarara or iguana, now found in different parts of the country, but of so enormous a size that they were able to devour a man with the greatest ease. The Waikato Natives have a tradition that one of these creatures infested the neighborhood of Pirongia, and that, after having devoured many of the tribe, it was at last killed by a person who made a suit of armor of wicker-work to protect himself from its formidable teeth. The Natives of Rotorua have likewise a tradition that their ancestors succeeded in catching, in a trap made of ropes, a similar monster, which had been destructive to unwary travellers on the road leading from thence to Taupo. And by the Natives of Cook Strait it is also reported that the same creature was once found in that part of the island. Are we to conclude, from these accounts, that some immense species of sauria, resembling the crocodile, was at one time indigenous to New Zealand ? I imagine that this can scarcely be admitted, otherwise some of their remains—in a semi-fossil state, like the bones of the moa—would in all probability have been discovered ere this. We are rather inclined to class the tradition with some of the foregoing fables.”

At Oamaru yesterday Peter Ah Gong wfcs committed for trial for stabbing Thomas Gallagher at Livingatotio With a knife. In the Blenheim slander case, Ransomo y. Fildes (manager of the Bank of New Zealand it Blenheim), the jury, after half an feotir’s deliberation, found for plaintiff s.nd awarded L 125 damages,

James Napier, driver of a baker's cart at Wellington, while suffering from toothache yesterday, took a quantity of caifijlliorktisd chloroform to relieve him, a'isd. was tendered insensible. Emetics Were applied, but the patient is still in & dangerous condition.

Mr T. DftnCan, writes to the Uam Sira ‘ Mail ’ expressing his opinion that there would be a better chance of getting the Station Peak country thrown open for settlement with Mr Hislop in the Ministry than out of it. He repeats the statement he made in the House that Mr Hislop has exerted himself, against the opposition of his colleagues, to get the land settled, Another house packed from floor to Ceiling witnessed the third entertainment givteh at the Princess’s by Mr Rickards’s Specialty Company last evening. Ml Rickards Wits heartily applauded fbr his rendering of ‘ Oh Guard 1 and ‘ the Bridge ’; while the fhnnimenta of Mr Bell kept the audience in roars of laughter, this afternoon there was a matinee, which was, Well attended. The Industrial School children were present by invitation of the management, and their band performed selections oh the stage. Another entertainment will be given tonight, The essay by Ralph W. Trine, which secured the L 25 prize offered by the Humane Society of America, shows by statistics that crime in the United States is increasing at a greater ratio than in any other civilised country except Spain and Italy. He attributes this fearful fact to lack of right training, and quotes Mrs Barney’s testimony: “ In all my experience with criminals, in all my conversations with them, in endeavoring to ascertain the causes which led them astray, only onco in a very, Very great while do I meet one who tells me ho had anything like proper training during youth." The lack is in heart culture, not head culture. Mr Trine says: “Moral, ethical, and humane training have not kept pace with intellectual training. There has been an abundance of mind culture, hut a sad neglect of heart culture, and more heart culture is what our country stands in need of to-day.” On this he bases his strong plea for humane education in the schools,

Many instances of heroism were given by women in the Conemaugh Valley. Along the Pennsylvania road most of the telegraph towers are in charge of women operators, and not one deserted her post when she saw the awful mountain of water rushing down upon iter. Mrs Ogle was one whose name deserves to he inscribed on the roll of the nation’s martyrs to principle. The warning of impending danger flashed to her over the wires, and she sent it on to those below. Back came the pleading message from those who loved her “Save yourself.” She answered: “My life is worth more here than it can ever be elsewhere,” and it was. Message after message her swift fingers sent of warning and direction, by which hundreds were saved. The wave advanced on her; she telegraphed “This is my last message,” a peculiar click told the operator at the other end that the connection was broken, and all was still. The tower and its brave occupant had gone down together.

An entertainment was given in the North Dunedin Volunteer Hall last evening in aid of the widow of the late James Thomson, of Pine Hill, and judging by the audience that last night assembled a goodly sum should be realised. The Mayor (Mr S. Myers) of North-east Valley occupied the chair, and in a brief speech referred to the respect in which the late Mr Thomson was generally held, and which was evidenced by the crowded attendance that night. Mr Cunningham played a pianoforte solo, Messrs Davie and Banker contributed solos which proved acceptable items, and subsequently sang a duet. A comic song by Mr Weils caused much merriment, the performer being encored, while Messrs Davis, Jeffs, and Fredric were pleasing in their respective contributions. Mr W. H. Smith sang a solo in a happy manner, while Mr James Jago was enthusiastically encored for his contribution, the performer appearing three times. Mr Kirk’s comic song was similarly received, while Messrs Hannigan, H. Bills, and H. Crawford were encored for their respective dances. A ventriloquial scena by Mr Dickie cauied a considerable amount of merriment, and a dance terminated tho proceedings.

A notice to passengers per R.M.S. Rimutaka appeals in this issue. A notice to members of Lodge Pioneer, 1.0.0.F.. appears in this is ue. On Friday evening a concert will be given in the City Hall in aid of the Wesleyan Church Ciicuit fu id. ’lhe wreck of the Koramri, together with her boa's and equipment, will be sold by auction on Wednesday, at Wellington, by T. Kennedy Macdonald and Co.

Picnic parties to the Waterfall and others will be glad to learn that a break will run between town and Nichols Creek every day, commencing on October 1. Particulars are advertised.

The concert advertised in another column to be given at the City Hall next Friday night is likely, judging from the programme, to meet with raoie than ordinary success. The so’oists are—Mrs W, Murphy, the Misses Christie and Cooper, Messrs Jago, Smith, Densem, Hunter, and Marsden, with Mr D. Cooke as accompanist.

The meeting of the Hand and Heart Lodge, M. 0.0 F., was held in the Oddfellows’ Hall, Stuart street, hst Tuesday evening: N. Bro. T. Mant presiding. Five new members were initiated P.G. Hopcraft and y.G. Douglass gave a report of the business done at the District meeting held at Oamaiu last week. The receipts were L 46 6s 4d. At a meeting of directors of the Caledonian Society held last evening it was decided to bold a Caledonian concert and ball in the Garrison Hall on tho 25th of November next, the evening before the opening of the Exhibition. An application was granted for the use of the ground on Saturday next, for an Aasociition football match between the Association and the Rugby Union players.

A social reunion was held last evening in St. Paul’s Schoolroom conjointly by the City Fire Brigade and the Dunedin Naval Artillery, seventy couples being present. Songs were contributed by Misses Fredric and Neill and Messrs MTCinlay, Murray, Drumm, Burns, and ■Wells Every credit is due to tho Committee for the very successful carrying out of the affair. Messrs Myers catered in their wellknown style.

The quarterly meeting of Pioneer Lodge, 1.0.0. F., was held in the Rattray street Hall on Tuesday evening, when there was a good attendance of members. Bro. Cole was appointed delegate to the friendly societies’ gala conference. The sum of Ll4 was handed to the grand treasurer, being the net proceeds of a iounion held on behalf of the benevolent fund of the Order. The sum of L2 was voted to a brother in distress, who was also recommended to the favorable consideration of the trustees of the benevolent fund. The receipts were L3O 7a Id.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890928.2.9

Bibliographic details

The Evening Star. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1889., Evening Star, Issue 8024, 28 September 1889

Word Count
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The Evening Star. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1889. Evening Star, Issue 8024, 28 September 1889

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