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A Land of Our Own

The land of our fathers, the land of our birth, Complains that too many her children have grown ; But she owns virgin realms in each clime of the earth, We may still be her sons in a land of our own! The same flag that Nelson and Wellington bore, In many as daring a venture hUh flown ; ' Where Cook’s gallant footsteps first claimed the wild shore, Let us hoist that proud flag o’er a land of our own! Our hearts and our minds will be always the same. In the torrid, or frigid, or temperate zone; We shall love the same country, uphold the same name, And make the same laws in a laud of our own. We shall hold the same creeds in the very same way, And build up the same churches of different stone; So that bishops and clergy m >y help us to pray For the blessing of God on a land of our own ! Proud nobles and courtiers! your coronets’ charms Ate great when for great deeds their owners are known. Then let chivalrous motto and blazon of arms Now herald us on to a land of our own. And you, gallant gentry, of whom ’tis our boast That your like can be found in Old Eng’aud alone, Take your place in the van; you shall teach us the toast Of “Live and let live" in a land of our own. Whether noble or gentle, ’twill bring you no shame To found empires in lands now despised or unknown. Come, and claim for the worthy rank, honors, and fame, For himself and his heirs in a land of onr own.

The same earnest will that your sires possessed Still flows in your blood, and is bred in your bona; On the nation we found let your nerve be impressed, While you give your good names to a land of our own. Bold farmers and yeomen, your foresight and care Must teach us to till, sow, and reap what we’ve sown; For while you “speed the plough,” wo shall still have a share Of “ Old England’s roast beet ” in a land of our own. With workmen of all trades to swell the brave throng, Over many a waste shall be industry strewn; And the workman shall earn, all the busy year long, “ Fair wage for his work ” in a land of our own. Those for whom we make room shall raise new mills on high, Where shall many a shuttle be merrily thrown ; While fleets of new ships bring the fabrics we buy With the plenty to spare in a land of our own. Wives, sisters and sweethearts shall share in our toil, And so deck the wide world with onr roses full blown; Thus, though changed all our seasons, our sky and our soil, We shall still find “ Sweet Home ” in a land of our own. If, when thus truly British—good, happy, and strong— We’d a Prince of the Blood on our Southern Sea Throne, How gladly our voices should echo the song Of ‘ Ood Save the Queen,’ in a land of onr own. B. Jebhinoham Wakefield,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890928.2.37.3

Bibliographic details

A Land of Our Own, Evening Star, Issue 8024, 28 September 1889, Supplement

Word Count
527

A Land of Our Own Evening Star, Issue 8024, 28 September 1889, Supplement

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