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YESTERDAY'S CABLES

Home and Foreign.

The Emperor of Germany will proceed to Constantinople after visiting Athens. It is believed at Brussels that Emin Pasha has entered the service of the BritishAfrican Company. The Porte, in deference to Russia, has withdrawn her circular asking the Powers to recognise Prince Ferdinand as Prince of Bulgaria. Lord Brassey has awarded the lightermen 6s per day of twelve hours, with Is per hour overtime. He has advised both parties to establish a permanent board of con? ciliation.

Wholesale arrests of Christians are being made in Crete.

It is reported at Athens that the Christians in Crete are being ruthlessly flogged and tortured and women outraged. The prisons are full, and the Christian population are fleeing for safety to the mountains.

The Norwegian barque Alert struck on an unknown reef in Gap Harbor. While the cargo was being removed she caught fire and sank. The crew are safe.

Reports from Lombak state that horrible barbarities are being perpetrated on slaves. Men and women are treated alike, and done to death by flogging and burning, and salt is rubbed into their wounds.

China is about to build a telegraph line 1,500 miles in length. At Ningpo a pontoon bridge was washed away and thirty Chinese drowned. Fearful floods have taken place in Japan. The loss of life is reported to be 10,000. At th.e London wool sales a better selection was offered, and prices were fully maintained and sometimes exceeded. The tone of the market just now is very buoyant. The dispute between Spain and Morocco has been settled.

Mr John Long (Gladstonian Liberal) has been elected unopposed for Dundee. The death >s announced of Eliza Cook, poetess, aged 91. [Eliza Cook, poetess, the daughter of a respectable tradesman in Southwark, was born about 1818, At an early age she contributed to various periodicals, including the 'New Monthly,-' 'Metropolitan,' 'Literary Gazette,' etc., and published in 1840 a volume of poems, which at once attiacted the attention of the public, and ;■ tamped her as a writer of great merit and originality. She more than sustained this favored position in the ' Journal' which boieh.er n me, and which was published weekly fropi 1819 until 1854, when, on account of failing health, it was given up, to the great regret of

its readers. Her poems, reprinted in a collected form, have passed through numerous editions, and a beautifully illustrated Christmas volume was issued in 18G0. She published another volume, entitled 'New Echoes and other Poems,' in October, 1864, and obtained a literary pension of LIOO per annum the tame year.—' Men of the Time.'] L 200.000 in gold have been shipped to Rio de Janeiro, and a similar amount will bo forwarded next week.

The Committee who were appointed by sympathisers with Mrs Mayrick have applied for a writ of habeas corpw, on the ground that the sentence is illegal.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890927.2.34

Bibliographic details

YESTERDAY'S CABLES, Evening Star, Issue 8023, 27 September 1889

Word Count
481

YESTERDAY'S CABLES Evening Star, Issue 8023, 27 September 1889

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