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The Evening Star. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1889.

As our Parliamentary Reporter predicted, a portfolio in the

Cabinet Atkinson Ministry lias Appointment. b een offered to, and will doubtless be accepted by, Captain Russell. It is understood that the member for Hawke's Bay will be appointed Minister of Education, and that should Mr Hislop bere-elected for Oamaru he will takehis old portfolio of Colonial Secretary. The appointment of Captain Russell will strengthen the Government in the House, as it will harden up the members of the Freetrade or Middle party. lie was a member of the Ministry formed after the general electiqa in September, LBB4, by Sir Harry (then Major) Atkinson, and which held office for one day onjy, a want-of-con-fidence motion tabled by Sir Robkkt (then Mr) Stout being carried hy 8 votes. His colleagues on that occasion were Major Atkinson, Mr Mitchelson, Mr Wakefield, Mr Hursthouse, and the Hon. George M'Lean. When Sir IT. Atkinson took office after the last general election lie desired Captain Russell to take a portfolio under hiir, but that gentleman declined, as he then contemplated a trip to -th& Old Country, which he made later. The member for Hawke's Bay is one of the most popular members of the House, and undoubtedly has great ability.

The Patients' and Prisoners' Aid Society continue to prosecute their A itoMi'ving philanthropic labors with unlm;tjt#HJoii. abated zeal. This society well

perform an extremely useful function is «* comparatively small community, and aro twteuate in having such an excellent agent as Mr Taupf WE :/or it is evident that in such a ease tb.e e&siency of the aid must depend in great measure on the character and qualifications of the pej&on who administers it. Some services can be fairly well performed by almost any body, for those which concern the weak and the erring, the sick and the insane, much tact and delicacy, as well as firmness and discrimination, aro required, Mr Torrance not only administers spiritual instruction and consolation to his motley flock ; but a great partof his work consistsin helpingand directing those who are discharged from the several inßti-Utfons in which he labors. A kind word ana ,a ,very small amount of assistance will Fometiroea .solace to change the whole course of a man J a jMe. Persons leaving gaol, especially after a long taw oi imprisonment, are in a very unior,tu,cpV position. Frequently they havo bo friends, W tf they, have they are perhaps at ,i distance, and', they cannot help feeling that society frowns upon them. In such oirc»mstajac/jfl there is a strong temptation to raIMW into crime, or, at any rate, to shrink froic the presence of their fellows, and thus rend«r.iao struggle for existence still more severe. It is lisfin that a kind look or sympathetic word is *aiie,jip,lly valuable ; and a little practical aid as wetf, # anch be necessary. It was remarked by some .orVijiif tweakers . at | the annual meeting of fcli*>

society, held on Tuesday last, that discharged prisoners were in even a more unfortunate position than discharged patients. The remembrance of their offences accompanies them and involves them in painful gloom, whereas recovered patients almost invariably experience a feeling of hope and gladness. To raise such miserable persona out df their natural despondency (we refer, of course, to the better claas of prisoners) and put them in the way of earning an honest livelihood is the purest charity ; it is, moreover, an economical as well as a philanthropic work". It saves fellow-creatures from ruin, and it also saves the country a considerablesum of money. The report on our prisons, which was recently commented on in these columns, shows what a costly thing crime is to the community. It is satisfactory to notice that Mr Torpasce sets his face sternly against anything like imposition. While ever ready to assist those who are willing to help themselves, he is steadfast in refusing aid to the idle and incurably There are three classes of persons, he says, whom he has determinedly to resist: "those who show "a disposition to hang upon one, and "to make themselves regular pensioners; "those who are extravagant and unreason- " able in their requests ; and those who in "effect demand monetary assistance as a " matter of right, and without any regard to " the manner of life pursued by them." There is no limit to the effrontery of some of the applicants with whom he comes in contact, and it is only a truism to say that familiarity with gaols tends to destroy the sense of independence nnd self respect. In every district there is, so to speak, a residuum of the population with whom it is impossible to deal in a satisfactory manner, Withthishopelessclass, whose lives are passed between more or less vicious idleness when they are at liberty and compulsory labor when they are imprisoned Mr Torrance has little or nothing to do, except so far as his ministrations are concerned, the care of such belonging properly to the State. But for all those requiring assistance in whom there is a spark of genuine hope or self-help, he is ever ready to do what he can.

Patients discharged from the lunatic asylums are often also very unfortunately situated, particularly if they have no friends and no resources. There is a prejudice amongst employers against them, as well as against discharged prisoners, though it is of course of a different kind. It tends all the same to prevent them getting employment. The president of the society (Mr Justice Williams) said a few well-timed words in their behalf. It was natural, he said, that people should hesitate to employ those who had been recently in an asylum ; but he thought the public might feel satisfied that if patients are discharged under the advice of a competent medical man there is always a wellimplied assurance that it is safe, as far as other people are concerned, to discharge them, and that there is thus no real danger in employing them. In such cases all good people will, at any rate, allow their courage to support the benevolent promptings of their hearts. It is certainly a great comfort to reflect that the unfortunate persons in question have always the sympathy and advice, and to a certain extent the practical assistance, of the excellent society by which Mr Torrance is employed. With regard to the inmates of the Seacliff Asylum, the gontleman just named mkes one very interesting statement, A service of song is conducted by the asylum organist in the forenoon, for the benefit of female patients who cannot be trusted at tho ordinary Sunday afternoon service. " The quieting and sobering effect of the service," says Mr Thrrange, "and " the earnestness and manifest delight with "which the. poor women (mindless as re "gards evciything else) take part in it are "surprising." So that music seems to have charms even for those who are in the deepest gloom of mental alienation. Hie report speaks gratefully of the support which the society receive from the public. For the past year the income was £4o!)—a modest sum, considering that the Agent's salary has to be paid out of it; but it"seeaia to have been more than sufficient, ns there v/:;& lit tho. end of the year an unexpended balance of nearly £SO. It is not, of eon rue, the pur|ws,o of the society to give substantial or* regular icjlnf to necessitous persons ; it does not, aw it wwc, trench upon the {'round occupied by the charitable aid boards. I to, chief design is to watch and guide such discharged prisoners and patients as may require sympathy and advice—to keep the erring and weak from sinking through want of fellow help and fellow feelin". A society with better aims, or more deserving of public support, does not exist. It dispenses the very best kind of charity—that, u» we have just said, which keeps the staggering .Qfr their feet till they can go alone and provide for themselves. The charity which it dispenses fa, moreover, charity pure and simple 5 maintained, op jt is, by the voluntary contributions of th,3 benevolent, untainted even by the suspicion of rate or statute.

The boy Robertson, who was admitted into the hospital yesterday afternoon, is progressing favorably.

The trial of the man M'Namara at Melbourne on a chargo of murdering one Fry by splitti/if; his head open resulted in a verdict of insanity keiug returned. A meeting of geiittec?.en interested in the forthcoming Otago regatU was held last night in the Port Chalmers Hotel. It was decided that the regatta take place on Boxing Day. The question of electing oncers was left till next meeting. Judging from interest displayed a very successful regatta shot-iu be tho result. A subscription list was stated in the room and liberally responded to. Wo are pleased to notice some of our musical friends think of the unfortunates who are confined in the Seacliff Asylum. The Grjon Glee Club paid the asylum a visit on Tuesday, and gave one of the best concerts ever held there, the part singing of the company being quite a feature in the entertainment The tinging of Misses Christie and Cooper fully deserved the encores which were responded to, and Mr Jatnea Jago had to respond to double encores. J)r thanked the club for the treat given, &Ad expressed the hope that they would favor yfco institution with another visit.

It is now reiated tfaa(b tfae real aotujrp ,of the long-continued illness of the Ring of phe Netherlands is nothing more nor Less than insanity. If the sufferer really be out of his mind—and it is alleged that the difficulty is of very long standing—at all events he is to be congratulated on having a very level head for business. For many years he has directed his energies toward the economical management of his finances, and he has been so successful in this that he has large landed properties in Java, America, and France. He haß also been a successful speculator on the Bourse, and will leave his conaort a fortune of many millions. Certainly his "insanity" seems to have taken a queer direction.

A pretty little story about the siege of Paris by the Germans in 1870 has just come to light. During the bombardment of the city the shells began to fall dangerously near the Jardin des Plantea, where M, Chevreul had his laboratory. Fearing that irrei/fivr.ble damage might be done to the cause of science, that gentlemen indicted a letter to £aissr X7ilhelm, in which he pointed out the facte, 6ud requested that the guns might be pointed in another direction. This, it is said, was at once done by the German authorities, showing that tbey were by no means the barbarians, bent only on destruction, that many writers would have the public beiieye.

Standing room only was at the Princess's last evening, when tho Rickards combination troupe made their second appear.ance. Manyof theitems were encored, and the scenery provided wa« also greatly admired. During the evening Mr Riokdrds thanked tho audience for their generous applause, arifi expressed the hope that they would have reaooii to be satisfied with the series of entertainaien,ts he had provided, as he had done his boat 't'p ,'aeserve the appreciation and patronage of the public, performance concluded with the comic sketch. ' The Elopement.' This evening there will .be another entertainment, and to-morrow a matinee will be given, at which a programme will be put forward especially suited te the tastes of ladies and children.

The only declaration of insolvency filed during the week was that of William Lane, aerated water manufacturer, of Dunedin. The installation of Lord Onslow as first Graud Master of the New Zealand Grand Lodge Freemasons baa been fixed to take place in Dunedin on December 20,

]u addition to the village settlement allotments, hullotted for at the Lund lioard yesterday, the following business in Crown lands has been transacted during the week : —I,OOO acres, Tautuku and Kimu districts, unsurveyed, cash price 15s per acre, was sold to Thomas M'Keuzie for cash ; and section ,°,l, block 1, Akatorc district, containing 52a lr sp, cash price l'2s Cd per acre, was taken up by Bryan Healy on perpetual lease.

When before the Justices this morning on a charge of having an unregistered dog in his possession, a man pleaded three excuses —first, that up North, where he came from, a gentleman used to go round and collect the money, giving receipts at the same time ; second, that the dog was a very small one, not above 71b; and third, that his "missus" was sick and forgot to remind him of the necessity to register. The Justices performed their duty without any excuse. During the bearing of an application for a prohibition order, the presiding Justices at the Poli-.e Court this morning took occasion to remark that the provision of the Act was of an unworkable character, inasmuch as there were no means by which a publican could recognise tho person whom he was forbidden to supply with liquor, and, further, if a man could not get drink in his own district ho had only to go a little distance away to procure as much as he could pay for. Counsel concurred in these remarks, but said he had to take tho law as he found it, and would therefore press his application.

The morphine habit has become so prevalent ii Berlin that it has become necessary for the Government to adopt preventive measures. It is said that women are particularly addicted to the use of the drug, and that it is no uncommon sight to see one of them produce a syringe in public and take a hypodermic injection. A law i.as recently been passed regulating the sale of morphine, by which druggists are forbidden to sell the drug except on the prescription of a doctor residing in the district, The prescription is not returned to the purchaser, who must procure a new one upon every occasion. Wholesale druggists can only sell to doctors and chemists, and in all cases great care must be taken as to the Identity of the purchaser.

Otago Angle rV Association annual meeting in the Coffee Palace this evening.

Annual meeting of Otago Cricket Association will be held in 0.P..U, Club Boom on Monday evening, Mr Edward Lees, of Caversham, has been elected organist for the Presbyterian Church of South Dunedin.

The first annual meeting of the Dunedin and Suburban Reserves Conservation Society will be held in the City Council Chambers on Moudiy ovening. To-morrow's football fixtures include Melroso v. Port Union, at Port Chalmers ; Maryhill v. Morniagton, at Maryhill. Aenociation game— Blues v. Colors, on the Caledonian Ground.

The quarterly meeting of the Linden Lodge, TJ.A.O.D,, was held in the Council Chambers, Roslyn ; A.D. Pro. Donaldson in the chair. The visitors included D.P. P>ro. Moss, P..A.D. Bro. Haynes, P.D.P. Pro. Hutchinson, A.D. Bro. Kason, and several others. D.P. Bro. Moss produced the balance.-sbeet and gave his report re late art union. The receipts were L 42 17s yd. Tho rehearsal for the Scotch concert was held last evening in the Garrison Hall, and at the close the Rev. Dr Stuart, in a humorous speech, presented the conductor (Mr A. M, Braik) with a handsome oil painting, by Pcrciyal, of a scene on Lake Te Anau, along with an epergrp for Mrs Braik The gifts were suitably acknowledgad. The concert promises to be one of the rao-t successful of the kir;d ever given in Dunedin.

The quarterly meet'ng of the Valley True Blue Lodge, P. A.P.S.A., was held in the lodge room, Valley Public Hall, on Tuesday evening, tho 24th inst., the W.M. Bro. W. W. Blair in the chair. A friendly vuit was received from theD.M. and brethren of the Loyal Fxcelsior Lodgo. Correspondence was received fiom the Grand Lodge granting permission to initiate new members for the next three in«nths at a reduction of half tho usuil rates of initiation fees. Delegates were appoint; dto tho friendly societies' procession at the Exhibition ; to tie friend'y societies' gala conference. Tho usual arrangements were made anent tho annual amalgamated sports. The receipts w»reLl7 Ifis<;d.

St. Peter's Club, which is now in the second year of its existence, is, we have reason to believe, doing good work among tho lads and young men of Caversham and ihe surronnding districts. Classes for debating and shorthand have been organised. The reading room, which is open every evening, is well patronised, and we note that a glee club is to hold its first practice next Monday night. The promoters of the club have every reason to bo satisfied with their work, which was undertaken and is being carried out on a purely philanthropic principle, and is wholly unsectarian, tho membership not being confined to any church, or having connection with the church at all, excepting that the meetings are held in St. Peter's Hall. The fee is so low that not even the poorest are excluded.

The jfollowing regulations recently published in the ' Gizette' are of great importance to seafaring men, particularly those on steamers: On and after Octobsr 1, 1889, no candidata will be allowed to bo examined for any grade, whether for extra, ordinary fore-and-aft, or Home-trade passenger ship certifi ate unless he has served at sea two years within the last six years, and fix months within the last three years immediately preceding the date of his application to be examined. A candidate for an ordinary certificate of any grade who does not already' hold an ordinary certificate of a lower grade must prove that ho has served twehe months in a square-rigged sailing vessel within the last five years. Any cases not coming with'u the above conditions must be submitted for the special consideration of the Marine Department before the candidate is allowed to be examined.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Evening Star. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1889., Issue 8023, 27 September 1889

Word Count
2,981

The Evening Star. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1889. Issue 8023, 27 September 1889

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