Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE HARRY RICKARDS SEASON.

Mr Harry Rickards, the popular comiqut who will be remembered as having had a very successful season here a few years ago, commenced a new season at the Princess’s Theatre last evening. There was a very large audience present, the house being crammed in every part. Many people were probably attracted by the very reasonable fees charged for admission ; but the majority were doubtless actuated by a desire to renew their acquaintance with one of the best exponents of character sketches that they have had the good fortune to see. Mr Rickards is this time surrounded by a far more numerous company than on the occasion of his previous visit here, and the faces of all the members are new to us. That there is plenty of talent among the combination was shown from the outset, The opening piece (if piece it may be considered) is dignified with the title of “Comedy,” but as a matter of fact there is neither plot nor construction about it. However, it serves the purpose of introducing some really comic passages between the representatives of the various characters, as well as any quantity of capital singing and clever dancing. Mr Rickards himself takes four different characters, with songs appropriate to each, and his impersonations are as remarkable as ever for irresistible humor and faithful truth to nature. His best comic songs in this portion of the entertainment are ‘ Fall inside ’ and ‘ I did it,’ while in the descriptive scene ‘On guard ’ he showed an unexpected amount of dramatic power. Mr James Bell took an Irish servant’s and a gardener’s character very skilfully; while Mr Fred Davis created immense amusement by his diverting comicalities as Patsy O’Shaughnassey, and subsequently as a corpulent but timorous warrior. Miss Ada Dolroy filled three very varied characters with much cleverness, her ‘ Lancashire ’ duet with Mr Bell being especially good. Miss Georgio Devoo and Miss M. Constance also did a lot of work in very taking stylo. The incidental scenery was extremely elaborate and very appropriate. After a short interval_ Miss Constance gave a wonderful skippingrope dance with a neatness and dexterity that delighted the audience, who would not ho satisfied until they were accorded a repetition of it. The “Liliputian Midgets ” created much wonder as well amusement, the illusion being carried out in a very clever manner. Then Mr Rickards came on again with the descriptive scene ‘The Bridge,’ in the course of which lie gave several character sketches in his incomparable style. He was followed by Miss Delroy in a remarkably pretty and graceful dance entitled ‘ Sweet Bouquet,’ which was applauded to the echo and enthusiastically encored. Mr Bell proved his versatility by contributing banjo and “ bone ” solos in perfect style, and ho also gained a deserved encore for his song “ Wait till the bus rolls by.’ Next came the Murphys brother and sister—in some tolerable Irish sketches ; and we must not omit to mention that the lady had, in the earlier portion of the entertainment, taken a responsible part, rendered vacant by the temporary indisposition of Miss Katie Rickards. Two members of the original hand of Spanish Students played some of their best pieces in the admirable manner rendered familiar to us by others of their company, and the programme was wound up by the performance of a “ screaming ” farce called ‘ The Elopement,’ which caused plenty of fun. Altogether, visitors to the theatre during Mr Rickards’s stay hero will have no cause to complain of lack of amusement.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ESD18890926.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE HARRY RICKARDS SEASON., Evening Star, Issue 8022, 26 September 1889

Word Count
585

THE HARRY RICKARDS SEASON. Evening Star, Issue 8022, 26 September 1889

Working